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Thread: ARTICLE NYT: Dairy Council to End Campaign

  1. #1
    thread-neutral quagga's Avatar
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    ARTICLE NYT: Dairy Council to End Campaign

    New York Times
    May 11, 2007
    By KIM SEVERSON


    Dairy Council to End Ad Campaign That Linked Drinking Milk With Weight Loss

    A national advertising campaign that associates dairy products with weight loss will be curtailed because research does not support the claim, according to the Federal Trade Commission.

    The advertisements, conceived by the promotional arm of the dairy industry and overseen by the Agriculture Department, feature slogans like “Milk your diet. Lose weight!” and suggest that three servings of dairy products a day can help people be slim.

    The effort includes a campaign called “Body by Milk” that is aimed at teenagers. It features Alex Rodriguez, the third baseman for the New York Yankees, and Carrie Underwood, an “American Idol” winner.

    The assertion that there is a link between weight loss and dairy consumption has long been contested by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, an advocacy and research group that promotes a diet free of animal products.

    The group petitioned the F.T.C. in 2005 to argue that the advertisements were misleading. In a May 3 letter to the group, Lydia Parnes, director of the agency’s Bureau of Consumer Protection, said Agriculture Department representatives and milk producers and processors had agreed to change the advertisements and related marketing materials “until further research provides stronger, more conclusive evidence of an association between dairy consumption and weight loss.”

    As of Thursday, the National Dairy Council still had a section of its Web site devoted to the weight-loss claim. But the site, along with some of the advertisements, will be changed, said Greg Miller, who is executive vice president of the council and has a doctorate in nutrition.

    “Like any other marketing campaign, after time you want to freshen them up and give the consumers what’s new,” Mr. Miller said. “That’s what’s happening here.”

    Dr. Neal Barnard, president of the group that brought the matter to the F.T.C., said it would continue to press the dairy industry on other claims, which include the assertion that calcium helps prevent bone fractures in older women.

    “I think people will start to recognize that the dairy industry, which used to have a mom-and-pop image, is a huge commercial entity that will exaggerate to sell its products,” Dr. Barnard said. Mr. Miller said most medical professionals agreed that dairy contributed to overall bone health and could help people maintain a healthy weight.

    “I think there’s a minority of people out there that just have very loud voices,” he said. “This is a vegan group that doesn’t want anyone to eat dairy.”

    Dairy products were upgraded in the 2005 revision of federal dietary guidelines, which recommended that people consume more low-fat milk and dairy products. An advisory committee that helped set the guidelines cited a report, partly financed by the dairy industry, which found that low-fat dairy products did not necessarily add to weight gain and that dairy products have certain nutrients that can help consumers meet dietary recommendations. The guidelines increased the amount of low-fat or fat-free dairy products to three cups a day, up from two cups.

    The dairy council is allowed to continue to use wording from those guidelines that says adults and children should not avoid milk and milk products because of concerns that they may lead to weight gain, the letter from the F.T.C. said.

    Marion Nestle, a professor of nutrition at New York University, said the agreement to modify the advertisements was groundbreaking. In her book, “What to Eat,” she argued that lobbying by the $50 billion dairy industry could sometimes cloud policy on nutrition. Though Ms. Nestle said she ate dairy products regularly and did not dispute their nutritional value, she said people could have a healthy diet without them.

    “Those ads were ridiculously misleading,” she said.

  2. #2
    thread-neutral quagga's Avatar
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    ARTICLE: Gravid Bovines - Modern Milk

    Harvard Magazine
    May-June 2007
    by Jonathan Shaw

    Gravid Bovines - Modern Milk

    "The milk we drink today may not be nature’s perfect food,” says Ganmaa Davaasambuu, a Mongolian physician who is a fellow this year at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Even as the scientific community has become interested in the effects of the bioactive substances found in pesticides, says Ganmaa, not much attention has been paid to the naturally occurring estrogens found in food, which are both far more abundant and more biologically available than environmental estrogens. In fact, she is concerned that the high levels of hormones found in commercially produced milk may be harmful to human health. Estrogens and other growth factors have been implicated in the development of hormone-dependent cancers: those affecting the prostate, testes, ovaries, breasts, and uterus.

    Skeptics note that humans have been drinking milk without apparent harm for millennia, she says. But modern milk is different. Her concern stems not from the use of bovine growth hormone (she excluded BGH-fed cows from her studies), but from the fact that milk-producing cows in commercial dairies, through use of artificial insemination and high-quality winter feed, are kept pregnant and lactating 300 days a year. “Cows are like humans,” she explains. “When they get pregnant, the estrogen levels in their blood, milk, and urine increase. [Human pregnancy tests detect similar increases.] This made me wonder—since the cows are pregnant all the time, the hormone levels in their milk should be really high.”

    While earning her doctorate in environmental health in Japan, Ganmaa began investigating the prevalence and effects of these naturally occurring hormones. In her native Mongolia, traditional patterns of milking—the same as those used in Westernized countries until the 1920s—are still followed: pasture-fed cows are milked only through the first three months of a new pregnancy. Their raw milk had only one-tenth the progesterone that she and her colleagues found in commercially produced milk in Japan.
    Mongolian physician Ganmaa Davaasambuu has linked increased tumor formation and growth in laboratory animals with chemically induced cancer to high levels of hormones in commercial milk. Seasonal milking practices among Mongolian nomads ensure that cows produce milk only during the first three months of a new pregnancy, when hormone levels are low. Because modern dairies, on the other hand, milk cows well into their next pregnancy, commercial milk often contains much higher levels of biologically active hormones.

    In a 2002 study of cancer and diet in 42 countries, Ganmaa and colleagues found that countries with the highest consumption of dairy products suffered the highest rates of prostatic and testicular cancer. (A similar study Ganmaa did in 2005 showed much the same results for breast, ovarian, and uterine cancers.) In 2003, the group focused on the relationship between rising rates of these cancers and increased dairy consumption in Japan. Prior to World War II, the Japanese consumed very little milk, and rates of these cancers were low. But in the 1950s, a school-lunch program that included milk was instituted nationwide. Since that time, the intake of milk has increased twentyfold, and the incidence of prostrate cancer has increased twenty-five-fold.

    Still, such epidemiological evidence is circumstantial. But in a 2004 study that used rats in which mammary cancer had been induced, she and her colleagues found that rats fed low-fat milk (1 percent) were more likely to develop tumors, and in greater numbers and of larger size, than rats fed water or artificial milk. [/b]In a 2006 study, also in rats, she proved that the hormones in milk are biologically active in animals.[/b] Both adult and immature milk-fed rats showed increased uterine weight—the gold standard for measuring the estrogen activity of food and other substances.

    During her time at Harvard, which began with a year as a research fellow at the School of Public Health under Stare professor of epidemiology and nutrition Walter Willett, she and her colleagues have conducted two pilot studies. The first compared American milk (whole, whole organic, skim, and “shelf-stable” ultra-high temperature milk) to milk from Mongolia. Levels of hormones and growth factors were low in both American skim milk (hormones are carried in the milk fat) and Mongolian milk. In a subsequent study, Mongolian third-graders were fed U.S. commercial milk for a month. The good news was that a number of the children who had been vitamin D-deficient when the study began saw those deficiencies corrected. “Milk is a complex food that contains many good things, such as vitamin B, vitamin D, and calcium,” Ganmaa notes. But the Mongolian schoolchildren’s growth- hormone levels shot up 40 percent; and the children grew, on average, one centimeter during the month—a statistically significant increase, according to Ganmaa. “But we don’t know if it will be sustained in the long term, whether it will affect their sexual maturation or their age at puberty,” she says. “One month is too short.” She and her Harvard colleagues are now seeking funding for a two-year study.

    Based on what she has found so far, Ganmaa believes that cows in late pregnancy should not be milked—or, at least, that such milk should be labeled to indicate that it comes from a pregnant cow. In the meantime, it is reassuring to know that skim milk from the United States has low levels of hormones, just like the traditional stuff from Mongolia.

  3. #3
    my mom mentioned this to me. she said "the vegans made the dairy industry stop putting weight loss claims on their stuff"

    ..the vegans
    everyone's right and no one is sorry. that's the start and the end of the story.

  4. #4
    stops to smell the roses veganella's Avatar
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    Haha, us rebels! It's great news.

  5. #5
    Happy Mad Rabbit Vegit-8's Avatar
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    Thanks for posting the great articles quagga.

    May peace and joy be with you.
    Vegit-8
    Live with compassion and respect.

  6. #6
    On the Railway to Hell doomdiva's Avatar
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    Hahahaha! No way! That's awesome! Now does that include that annoying Yoplait commercial with the "...itsy-bitsy-teeny-weeny yellow polka-dot bikini..."

    OMG now I'm singing it! Damn you Yoplait! Damn You! Please make it stop!!!

  7. #7
    an open book Miso Vegan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miller of the Dairy Council

    “Like any other marketing campaign, after time you want to freshen them up and give the consumers what’s new,” Mr. Miller said. “That’s what’s happening here.”
    Like the milk mustache & got milk campaign?

  8. #8
    smoo + hat Chijou_no_seiza's Avatar
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    god those comercials suck! (and I am a fan of commericals, I find marketing fascinating) but there is nothing good about them they aren't even witty!


    But I am glad they are ending that BS campaign, it's about time.
    "The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking we were at when we created them." -- Albert Einstein

  9. #9
    probably cold right now superwife's Avatar
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    i just signed on to post this it was on the FRONT PAGE of google news today!!

    Lose the ads, not the weight, says doctors’ group
    By Associated Press
    Friday, May 11, 2007 - Updated: 01:35 PM EST

    WASHINGTON - An ad campaign that suggested milk can help people lose weight is ending, the Federal Trade Commission told a doctors’ group that had complained.

    The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine contended the weight loss claims were false and misleading. The group, in a 2005 petition, asked the commission to order a halt to the dairy advertisements.

    The agency did not take that step, but said in a letter to the committee that the groups behind the ads planned to end them.

    "It is obvious that the industry did not have a leg to stand on," Neal Barnard, president of the Washington-based doctors committee, said Thursday. His group advocates a vegan diet, which typically includes no animal products.



    The two marketing campaigns at issue involve the "Milk your diet. Lose Weight!" ads on television, Internet and in magazines, and the "3-A-Day. Burn More Fat, Lose Weight" ads, which are now mostly Web-based.

    The FTC, in a letter May 3 to the committee, said the agency met with Agriculture Department officials and representatives for the two campaigns, which decided "to discontinue all advertising and other marketing activities involving weight loss claims until further research provides stronger, more conclusive evidence."

    Susan Ruland, a spokeswoman for the "Milk your Diet" campaign, said there was nothing misleading about the ads.

    "We absolutely stand behind our weight loss campaign and the science supporting our messages," said Ruland, who represents the National Fluid Milk Processor Promotion Board. "There’s a strong body of scientific evidence that demonstrates a connection between dairy and weight loss."

    Still, she said, the board plans to phase out the milk ads and focus the campaign instead on how dairy can help promote a healthy diet.

    The National Dairy Promotion and Research Board said it has already changed its "3-A-Day" campaign.

    The Agriculture Department, which has oversight of the two boards, had approved the ads. A spokesman said the agency supports the decision to pull back from the campaigns.
    give me ambiguity or give me... something else.

  10. #10
    On the Railway to Hell doomdiva's Avatar
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    The only "proof" I've seen in dairy resulting from weight loss was on a Discovery Channel program about morbidly obese people. One woman was put on a predominantly milk-only diet and lost a visually significant amount of weight, which saved her from needing gastric bypass surgery. However, from the caloric intake calculations I did in my head, it seems to me she lost weight merely from not eating 10,000 calories a friggin day.

    So, was she able to fill up more quickly than her usual diet? Perhaps. But I'm willing to bet she'd get the same effect, but on a much more well-rounded (and a whole lot less BORING) diet that included a lot of fiber, whole grains and whatnot! And the thing is, they didn't show her again, so I wonder if once she got down to a couple hundred pounds or whatnot, if she put the weight back on.

    I'm willing to bet she did, because most people will binge on things they love when that much variety is deprived of them. Just living on milk (which Ron made evil comparison baby cow jokes about her!) has well, that's gotta suck! b-o-r-i-n-g.

  11. #11
    an open book Miso Vegan's Avatar
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    Article: FTC tells Dairy Council.....

    Milk is not a Diet Food

    "... so just stop it, m'kay?"

    Maybe not is so many words. The article goes more like this:

    The Federal Trade Commission has asked the dairy industry to remove its "Milk Your Diet" ads after research failed to support claims that milk can help people lose weight.

    After a yearlong marketing campaign, the Dairy Council has conceded what your uncle Harry could have told you in a minute. Milk is not a diet food.

    Watch for the dairy industry to end its "Milk Your Diet," and "3-A-Day: Burn More Fat, Lose Weight" campaigns "until further research provides stronger, more conclusive evidence of an association between dairy consumption and weight loss," says Lydia Parnes, director of the Federal Trade Commission's Bureau of Consumer Protection.

    While the industry stands by its allegations -- "There's a strong body of scientific evidence that demonstrates a connection between dairy and weight loss," says National Fluid Milk Processor Promotion Board spokesman Susan Ruland -- it will now claim that low-fat dairy products do not necessarily add weight and may have "certain nutrients that can help consumers meet dietary requirements." (Pretty much the definition of food.)

    The Milk Your Diet campaign (also called BodyByMilk; Think About Your Drink; Why Milk?; 24oz/24hours; 3-A-Day; and Got Milk? as in -- one of these slogans has got to work!) did not start out so humble.

    It shipped truck-size posters of 'stache-wearing David Beckham, Carrie Underwood and New York Yankee Alex Rodriguez to 45,000 public middle and high schools and 60,000 public elementary schools last fall and conducted an online auction where students could use milk UPC codes as currency. ("It's an amazing experience," say the web promos, which were still up in May. "Did we mention you have a chance to win an iPod? And a Fender guitar? And cool clothes from Adidas and Baby Phat? All you have to do is drink milk to get it. Any size. Any flavor.")

    The campaign offered $1,000 America's Healthiest Student Bodies Awards to schools with the "most active" students and saluted them with what? Got Milk recognitions.

    And it exhorted Hispanic communities to Milk Their Diets, too, during its 75-city Great American Weight Loss Challenge tour in 2006.

    "Given the high obesity rates among Hispanics and the reality that they are predisposed to certain diseases, it becomes more essential to educate them about good eating habits," said Claudia González, author of "Gordito Doesn't Mean Healthy," and a nutritionist who traveled with the Challenge.

    The problem was the diet itself.

    It advised you to drink 24 ounces of milk every 24 hours -- part of "your reduced-calorie diet" -- using modifications like:

    "Sip on a cappuccino or latté instead of black coffee."

    "Substitute milk for water in recipes."

    "Make soups and chowders with milk."

    "Add milk to risotto and rice dishes for a creamier texture."

    "Order a milk-based soup like corn chowder, potato leek or cream of broccoli as a first course at dinner."

    "Freeze strawberry or banana milk in popsicle containers for a tasty 'milksicle' treat." (Aren't we getting a little close to the "ice" word?)

    "Make some old-fashioned oats with milk instead of water."

    Not only did it sound like a diet for recovering anorexics, to lose weight you'd have to eliminate many other foods. (Precisely the point, the dairy industry would no doubt say.)


    Or as a commentator on a nutrition website put it, if burning and reducing calories are doing the "heavy lifting" why not the "the apple diet? Cut calories, burn calories, eat an apple before every meal."

    Of course the dairy industry has a lot more problems these days than milk not causing weight loss.

    So far this year, milk consumption has been linked to prostate cancer in Cancer Causes & Control, Parkinson's in the American Journal of Epidemiology and acne in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

    Standard dairy practices from rBST injections to veal calf and downer treatments have horrified consumers -- with milk from cloned animals sure to turn the public off further.

    And communities are increasingly zoning out megadairy farms, called environmental crack houses by activists.

    In fact, it seems one of the only good things you can say about milk these days is that it's not from China. At least as far as we know.

  12. #12
    Peaceful Warrior VegeTexan's Avatar
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    Wow, I think our movement has made quite a bit of progress recently.
    Stories about the inhumane treatment of dairy cows, and the dangers of using dairy products have been in the news more now than ever before.

    BTW, I make wonderful creamy soups, asparagus, potato, mushroom, with soy milk, just like mom used to make, but better, tastier, and no cruelty to cows. And omnis wonder what we eat. :shakes head emoty:

  13. #13
    Ordained Church of Cheezish Minister MissLovely's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VegeTexan
    Wow, I think our movement has made quite a bit of progress recently.
    Stories about the inhumane treatment of dairy cows, and the dangers of using dairy products have been in the news more now than ever before.

    BTW, I make wonderful creamy soups, asparagus, potato, mushroom, with soy milk, just like mom used to make, but better, tastier, and no cruelty to cows. And omnis wonder what we eat. :shakes head emoty:
    All of this has inspired Cream of Broccoli for dinner!
    TEMPORAMA

  14. #14
    Peaceful Warrior VegeTexan's Avatar
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    yum yum good
    yum yum good

    a couple of slices of tofutti cheese would be good in that, serve with a dark bread.

  15. #15
    we are borg grog's Avatar
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    Have you heard of Cargills next add campaign?

    "Lard makes you Lean!"
    "Butt out the Butter, replace with Lean Lard"
    "Milkshakes are so unhealthy, try a Lardshake instead. Lose weight and it tastes great!"
    "Bacon, its not just for breakfast anymore!"
    Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them? - Gandalf the Grey

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