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View Full Version : Pillsbury Crescent Rolls are NOT definitely vegan!



warhooligan
07-08-2006, 04:09 AM
"Among the most common animal ingredients are products made from boiling down (rendering) surplus animal fats and tissues. These include lard, animal shortening, gelatin, cholesterol and tallow, which are animal derived by definition. Alternatives to gelatin include agar-agar, carrageenan, and cornstarch. Gelatinized starch refers to starch softened by boiling.

Also common are stearates, which includes almost any ingredient with -stear- in its name; and glycerides, including glycerin and almost any ingredient with -glycer- in its name (including datem, which stands for diacetyltartaric acid esters of monoglycerides). While these are sometimes derived from pure vegetable sources, they are generally produced by rendering a combination of animal and vegetable fats. "

as reported at http://www.publicservantlifestyle.co.uk/dynamic/sections/food_drink/article_display.php?id=863

DATEM is found in crescent rolls as well as fresh bakery bread at Vons/Safeway, and I'm sure a lot of other places. This is one of those ingredients that makes me feel like I just shouldn't eat anything unless it is all natural.:confused: Its especially confusing because the PETA website lists the rolls as vegan, but I went to the store and checked and DATEM's in there.

hazelfaern
07-08-2006, 07:32 AM
Are you sure? Glycerin products, including mono- and di-glycerides can be made from either plant or animal sources. Is there a reason to believe that Di-Acetyl Tartrate Ester of Monoglycerides are always made from animal sources?

Miso Vegan
07-08-2006, 11:59 AM
The only way to know whether the source is animal or vegetal is ask Pillsbury, but they may not know what the source is from batch to batch. They probably buy the cheapest. I would have expected PETA to check this aspect out.

grog
07-08-2006, 01:23 PM
Peta doesn't check trace ingredients on their list of vegan foods. I thought that was well known? We talked about it somewhere.

neverfeltbetter
07-08-2006, 05:57 PM
what? no. what?:confused:

grog
07-08-2006, 06:09 PM
Peta doesn't check trace ingredients on their list of vegan foods. I thought that was well known? We talked about it somewhere.

Sorta discussed here (http://www.plantbasedpeople.com/showthread.php?t=3793)

warhooligan
07-08-2006, 07:01 PM
according to foodfacts.com it is literally impossible to know the source of datem.

neverfeltbetter
07-08-2006, 09:54 PM
wouldn't there be cholestoral if it were animal derived? i am majorly bummed about this. *we just ATE these!*:mad:

warhooligan
07-08-2006, 11:53 PM
I think its such a small amount, and so heavily processed, that there isn't, or maybe trace amounts too small to be required to be reported. It also contains no protein.
Im really sad about stear- ingredients. I didnt realize that was animal derived. One more thing to look for on the label. :(

Rawj
07-11-2006, 02:44 PM
stear- ingredients can also be from plants

Kat
07-11-2006, 06:18 PM
stear- ingredients can also be from plants

I originally mis-read this as "stear - ingredients can also be from pants."

Maybe it's time for new glasses.

zatoichi
07-11-2006, 06:19 PM
or a new psychologist.

VeganArtist
08-09-2006, 04:47 PM
Who here eats Pillsbury Crescent Rolls? I am wondering if it would be appropriate to take a dish to a vegan potluck that contains these as an ingredient. The dish requires a croissant-type of crust. I don't want to offend anyone by doing this if they are not really considered vegan. Do you think it would be appropriate?

Miso Vegan
08-09-2006, 09:08 PM
I wouldn't risk it, VeganArtist.

vegan200
12-23-2009, 01:51 PM
If you are going to a vegan potluck, chances are people do not track trace ingredients (and it's really not as important as the general animal ingredients easily identifiable). Those people usually stay home because they expect the vegan potluck to not be vegan.

For a great article to provoke some thought on the subject, check out Vegan Outreach's website and click on articles and advocacy and read the one title How Vegan?

quagga
12-23-2009, 01:58 PM
Here are the guidelines I use for the vegan meetups I organize:
http://www.meetup.com/chico-vegan/pages/Chico_Vegan_Potluck_Guidelines/


1) All food must be vegan, which is defined as not containing any animal products. By this I mean no: meat, milk, cheese, eggs, honey, yogurt, butter, whey, lard, casein, gelatin, fish, animal broth etc.
[snip]
9) While we will do our best to ensure all food is vegan, we cannot guarantee it. Eat at your own risk.

steven1222
12-30-2009, 11:35 AM
If you are going to a vegan potluck, chances are people do not track trace ingredients (and it's really not as important as the general animal ingredients easily identifiable). Those people usually stay home because they expect the vegan potluck to not be vegan.

I would stay home because of people who think it is okay to serve to a vegan something that may contain trace animal ingredients. You're not helping the cause by seemingly promoting that.:umm:

Personally, I tend to avoid anything with questionable ingredients unless the producer assures me of its vegan status.