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Lentil
03-21-2011, 01:29 PM
I'm interested in hearing ways that people work to reduce animal suffering and death, aside from excluding animal products from your diet.

I used to volunteer with an animal rescue group (mostly dogs and cats), and my own dog is rescued. I don't have a ton of free time/energy these days, but I would like to do more. So, I'm hoping I can glean some ideas from you guys. :)

Also feel free to post ideas you've had but haven't acted on, or things you've heard of!

Lentil
03-21-2011, 04:19 PM
I should add, this would also include ways you might increase public awareness about animal issues.

Dandelion
03-21-2011, 11:33 PM
Great idea for a thread! :cool:

vegankitty
03-24-2011, 12:55 AM
I do rescue-I volunteer on day a week at a no kill shelter and I do home visits, transport and various other things for another rescue. I also am fostering a cat for them. I was doing the campaign to ban carriage horses-getting signatures and talking to people but I stopped getting email alerts from them. And I am in charge of a program that helps hook homeless people with dogs (mostly dogs, at least) with vet care.

Soymilk_Gun
03-25-2011, 11:38 PM
I work part time at a local private shelter, the owner does feral TNR work and the shelter is for sick, at-risk, or adoptable cats.

I unused to go to protests a lot but haven't been doing much on it lately. The anti-vivisection campaign here was essentially shut down with the AETA 4 arrests. But there was fur shop we would protest, at one point we had daily leafleting, they have since closed and the property is now being used by a medical cannabis club or doctor. We haven't been able to confirm how much the protests were responsible but it was the only actual fur shop in Oakland so I'm glad its gone. I also think donating to animal lib prisoners and especially animal sanctuaries is important.

I truthfully feel the best or most sure way to help animals is through "direct aid", whether that is liberating it from captivity, providing medical care to farm or wild animals, moving a turtle off a highway, adopting a dog, providing sanctuary, ect. Not buying meat, dairy, eggs, and all is nice but with strict veganism at less than 1% of the population its really more symbolic.

Dandelion
03-26-2011, 12:02 AM
I truthfully feel the best or most sure way to help animals is through "direct aid", whether that is liberating it from captivity, providing medical care to farm or wild animals, moving a turtle off a highway, adopting a dog, providing sanctuary, ect. Not buying meat, dairy, eggs, and all is nice but with strict veganism at less than 1% of the population its really more symbolic.
Agreed. I think open rescues (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_rescue) are some of the most effective tactics where people put their freedom on the line to directly save an animal(s). It's practical, mostly symbolic but drives the message home in an honest way that people can't as easily dismiss activists as terrorists.

Soymilk_Gun
03-26-2011, 12:34 AM
I dont think its symobolic at all, we dont have the power to save all the animals so we have no real ethical responsibility for that. But for that one or those two we can save...maybe we do.

When folks say that liberations and rescues are pointless I just think of The Parrable of the Starfish

One morning an elderly man was walking on a nearly deserted beach. He came upon a boy surrounded by thousands and thousands of starfish. As eagerly as he could, the youngster was picking them up and throwing them back into the ocean.

Puzzled, the older man looked at the young boy and asked, "Little boy, what are you doing?"

The youth responded without looking up, "I'm trying to save these starfish, sir."

The old man chuckled aloud, and queried, "Son, there are thousands of starfish and only one of you. What difference can you make?"

Holding a starfish in his hand, the boy turned to the man and, gently tossing the starfish into the water, said, "It will make a difference to that one!"

I know its sappy and religious in origin but I think it is true. Their own individual "experiance of life" is what matters most to sentient beings.

Dandelion
03-26-2011, 10:10 AM
I dont think its symobolic at all, we dont have the power to save all the animals so we have no real ethical responsibility for that. But for that one or those two we can save...maybe we do.

Oh no, you're right, wrong thread! :)

Lentil
03-26-2011, 01:28 PM
I have to say, I have zero interest in participating in illegal activities leading to rescue of animals from farm, zoo, or research settings. This might be a cultural thing, but most people I know would not be very sympathetic even to "open rescue." That sort of stuff is one reason I feel really hesitant about getting involved in a local animal rights group, although I don't know if they actually participate in or support those activities. Being associated with such activities would be extremely risky for my future career.

Perhaps getting involved in animal rights in person at all could be problematic for a career in scientific research in academia. But, I do feel like there are other (legal) ways to help animal and promote a change in the way people think about them.

Dandelion
03-26-2011, 02:33 PM
Perhaps getting involved in animal rights in person at all could be problematic for a career in scientific research in academia. But, I do feel like there are other (legal) ways to help animal and promote a change in the way people think about them.It's gonna take all sorts of actions to fight for animal rights so not everybody has to engage in illegal activities. There are tons of other ways to advocate on behalf of animals, we just gotta find or invent them.

Not to take this too far off topic but open rescue is a form of civil disobedience and does have its place. It's not for everybody, it's costly and should be wielded carefully. What 'makes the most difference' is a popular but futile discussion as it takes all sorts of honest and peaceful tactics to convince the wide array of fancy monkeys out there. I would like to help move "animal rights" out of the ALF stereotype and more into mainstream consciousness. Perhaps that requires different phrasing, I dunno, that's why PBP is here.

vegankitty
03-30-2011, 07:38 AM
Any above ground animal rights group is not going to participate in illegal activities. Well, not unless they are stupid. If you are worried about your career working at a shelter or sanctuary isn't controversial.