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topperarnold
11-01-2008, 05:28 PM
One, I am no storyteller and anyone who is an English teacher or editor will end up in the fetal position when this is done.

The number one reason I am going vegan (again) is the animals. I don't want something to suffer because I have no damn self control. I don't need meat, dairy and eggs to be healthy and happy and the food industry keeps lying to me and telling me I do. In fact, I've eaten better in the last two weeks since I've gone vegan (again). Ironic, but true. I eat BETTER when animals aren't involved. Seriously, once I cleared my head of the meat/dairy juggernaut of advertising and started thinking for myself (again), I began experiences (gasp!) variety and flavor in my meals (again.)

Health is another reason I'm going vegan. I'm seriously not getting younger (my 40's are FAST approaching) and I don't want to burden my wonderful daughter with my clogged arteries and health problems years from now (probably about the time she'll be dealing with *her* teen-aged children...really? do I want to put her through that?)

My family is awesome, Hubby and daughter are not vegan, but are on board with the vegan household rule. Daughter is actually away at college (getting a useful degree in Early Modern History/Classics with a minor in Anthropology.) She was the first in our house to go vegetarian (although she has since fallen off the wagon) when she was in the 7th grade (maybe 8th?) Hubby is a health nut (lost 150 years ago...with a strict veggie diet) and the most awesome patient man on earth.

Now, the reason I'm scared as hell is that I'm pretty religious (Jewish), I'm pretty conservative (voted republican in my last election...W's daddy, was the last time I voted...yeah, I know, I'm a bad citizen) and I feel pretty "outside" of the vegan community....I live waaaay below the Mason-Dixon line...do vegans even live in Alabama? Sometimes I feel I have very little in common with vegans....but I don't want to stereotype (almost as evil as factory farming imho), so I hope I'm not offending anyone. I also feel a little guilty 'cause I got a house full of non-vegan products (we're not talking food items, mainly cleaners, shoes, lotions etc etc...hopefully you get the picture) that I want to replace with vegan ones as they run out (guess that makes me part of the "gradual" camp), but I still feel a bit like a fraud.

Another stumbling block: I'm an unmitigated disaster in the kitchen. Finished product tastes fine, but something will get broken, spilled on the floor or injured before the main course makes it to the dining room table.

Anyhoo, I got a good vibe from this board (which I stumbled upon thanks to the Google) and I hope that I'll feel a little more a part of the great vegan train.

sara

VegeTexan
11-01-2008, 07:59 PM
Hi Sara and welcome to VR.
Don't feel like a fraud. Veganism is usually gradual after the food change.
There's no rule you have to throw out/give everything away and start fresh.

Miso Vegan
11-01-2008, 10:25 PM
Hi Sara! Nice to have you here. We'll try to be friendly to you. :D

La Végétalienne
11-01-2008, 11:47 PM
Welcome topperarnold!


a.
One, I am no storyteller and anyone who is an English teacher or editor will end up in the fetal position when this is done.
b.
Now, the reason I'm scared as hell is that I'm pretty religious (Jewish), I'm pretty conservative (voted republican in my last election...W's daddy, was the last time I voted...yeah, I know, I'm a bad citizen) and I feel pretty "outside" of the vegan community
c.
Another stumbling block: I'm an unmitigated disaster in the kitchen. Finished product tastes fine, but something will get broken, spilled on the floor or injured before the main course makes it to the dining room table.

a. I'm an editor and I'm still sitting upright. I love the way your personality comes through in your post.
b. We could probably use some balance in the politics department.
c. That's the fun part! :cool:

veganshawn
11-01-2008, 11:50 PM
Welcome

sitting_vegan
11-02-2008, 12:25 AM
Welcome!

I've been vegan a year and am still using up some stuff (soap, shampoo, deoderant.)

topperarnold
11-02-2008, 07:41 AM
Hey! Thanks everyone! I'm really looking forward to this!

I love everyone's avatars!

sara

La Végétalienne
11-10-2008, 12:17 AM
I live waaaay below the Mason-Dixon line...do vegans even live in Alabama?
I met one the other day! A vegan from Alabama (or was it Georgia?), I mean. You are not alone! (Actually, you might be, if she's the only other one, 'cause she's in Indiana now. ;))

topperarnold
11-10-2008, 08:23 AM
:laugh:

bumblebee
11-10-2008, 10:34 AM
I think one is a very good citizen if they are republican and don't vote. ;)

Welcome. :)

topperarnold
11-10-2008, 10:55 AM
I think one is a very good citizen if they are republican and don't vote. ;)

Welcome. :)
I voted libertarian in this election :-)

Provoked
11-18-2008, 08:21 PM
Hi! Twenty years ago I burned my SS card at a Florida - Liberatarian demonstration! :happy: Guess we vegans are the new "rebels" of the south!

You're in great company here... We're all in a mixed bag and going through the "process". . . I sure haven't had my last thought on the whole (non-vegan) world (yet).

Anyway, VR is a great place to work through all of it... They (we) are a great bunch - :banana::banana::banana:
So Welcome and very nice meeting you!

lullured
11-19-2008, 01:34 AM
I still have a lot of my old, (mostly unvegan) stuff like deodorants, shampoo, cleaners, wollen sweaters, leather shoes....

It just wasn't my top priority to get rid of all that when I first became a vegan (except for the sealskin mittens). Instead I was focusing more on food and then the rest have been coming along gradually, whenever I needed to buy something new.

Admiral Halsey's RAM
11-19-2008, 03:33 AM
Like you I don't fit the vegan stereotype. I'm probably a little more typical than you are, but as the decades have passed, many liberal notions have regrettably fallen by the wayside. It's just a matter of seeing what nice ideas failed and learning to distinguish between what I wish was true and what ended up being true. I've never voted Republican though. Even if McCain had said he was rounding all the illegals up and putting landmines at the borders I still couldn't have brought myself to vote Republican.

topperarnold
11-19-2008, 06:26 AM
Wow. do you really feel that strongly about the "illegals"? Thank heaven they are here to pick our vegetables and do other work US citizens feel is "beneath them" (and for a pittance no less.)

I might as well state it now that there are two things that I find deplorable about this country: the mistreatment of animals and the exploitation of human workers. (If that many people are "breaking the law", maybe we should revisit the law...I"m just sayin')

phloxy
11-19-2008, 09:14 AM
Welcome sara! We're already acquainted a little bit, and it's great that you're here!

I agree with La Végétalienne's post. I'm also an editor, and you did just fine! As for kitchen disasters, I was horrible (horrible) when I first became vegan. Now I'm actually pretty competent in the kitchen with cooking and with baking. I still usually burn myself on the oven or stove, but the actual making food part isn't the disaster it once was. You'll be just fine, and it's really fun learning.

Also, there's really no such thing as a fraud when you are doing your best and working your way toward complete elimination of animal products. Few people can afford to replace everything right away, so be compassionate to yourself, and before long, you'll figure all of that out.

Welcome again!

Admiral Halsey's RAM
11-19-2008, 07:29 PM
Wow. do you really feel that strongly about the "illegals"? Thank heaven they are here to pick our vegetables and do other work US citizens feel is "beneath them" (and for a pittance no less.)

If people could swallow the notion of paying more for food, we could elevate the noble career of plant-rearing to the place it rightfully belongs. But we have machines to do much of the work, leaving more eaters than useful work positions. Once one gets away from an agrarian way of life, problems creep in and our economic system seems ill-equipped to deal with (let alone admit to) it. Not that it's all bad- division of labor has allowed humans to do some great things. But there's a downside. Mechanization means you risk having less jobs than there are people. Hence the strange phenomenon where brainless pratts become rich by providing "entertainment". Related to that is the IP worker, the IT worker, the artists, the musicians, etc. It's wonderful that such workers can flourish, but in hard times, the non-essential sector gets hit hard.

Picking crops is not easy work. The health risks as typically practiced are also high. Fair pay should be offered. But people can't stand to pay any more, what with ever-rising taxes, and a for-profit health care system with the insurance industry skimming as the middle man. We have let our economic system become an evil evil thing. For what we pay in taxes we should be getting more services. Our system is a mess. Meanwhile Americans write in LTTEs saying Socialism doesn't work - although it's worked very well for decades in Europe. Until recently when they've had a rising tide of guess what... immigration. I suspect that the rate of population change in Europe is part of the problem, as it is here. If immigration were slower, and the lands to which they move weren't already heavily populated, it might be different.

If we removed immigration as a source of additional ecological, economic and social problems, we could help ourselves, as well as coerce change in their native countries. By keeping other countries like Mexico from exporting their social woes here, we encourage them to address their own problems. If problems get bad enough there, sooner or later, sparks fly and you'll have a revolution. We could use one of those too, but how many vegans are armed? :-)



I might as well state it now that there are two things that I find deplorable about this country: the mistreatment of animals and the exploitation of human workers. (If that many people are "breaking the law", maybe we should revisit the law...I"m just sayin')

Capitalism is by definition all about unfairness. You always ask for more than what something is worth. Given the legislative realities and difficulties in protecting what little wild land exists in the US, it seems clear that limiting population growth is the single most important thing we can do (since we know corporate lobbyists tend to get the enviro loopholes they ask for, the kind of preservationst protections we want isn't likely to be forthcoming).

So we have to face the population problem. And since most of that domestic population growth is from immigration and their susequent offspring, there's another reason we need to limit entry into the US. Immigration means population increase, which always means less wilds land for animals.

The problem with the massive waves of immigration is self evident. The US is buckling under the strain. Fewer jobs, but more mouths to feed, and more vital human services needed while the tax base stays the same or shrinks.

The growing population (yes, even though we live in a wealthy western country the population here is taking off like a rocket) means more demand for fuel, which drives up prices for everything. Rent and land also become more expensive. And of course the natural places in the US are being "developed" to make room for that exploding population. In other words, nature loses.

The population in the US went from 200 Million in 1990 to a little over 300 Million as of the next census (done every 10 years). That's a 50% jump in only 10 years. That jump would be alarming in a century, nevermind 10 years. It took from 1492 to 1990 to get to 200 Million. Then we're at 304 Million. You do the chart... it's not as alarming as the CO2 chat in Al Gore's movie, but still alarming.

topperarnold
11-20-2008, 06:52 AM
Well, I'm not one for debate since I live under a rock etc and really have no skills for it. I am glad, though, that my immigrant grandfather was able to make it in (and raise a family on a waiter's pay). I'm also greatful that my husband's immigrant grandparents were able to make it in.

I wonder how much money the increased 100 million pumped in to our economy?...and their native country's economy, too (since most immigrants are supporting a family here and there.)

Mainly I took offense at your statement that you wouldn't have voted for McCain even if he said he was going to put land mines at the border...That just seems harsh to me.

topperarnold
11-20-2008, 06:57 AM
I agree with La Végétalienne's post. I'm also an editor, and you did just fine! As for kitchen disasters, I was horrible (horrible) when I first became vegan. Now I'm actually pretty competent in the kitchen with cooking and with baking. I still usually burn myself on the oven or stove, but the actual making food part isn't the disaster it once was. You'll be just fine, and it's really fun learning.


Thank you :)
I am actually becoming more competent in the kitchen. Being vegan has kind forced me to prepare my own foods. Which also means I think more about what I eat and in fact, I feel I eat better now and enjoy food even more!