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vegankitty
01-12-2009, 06:25 PM
I'm reading this one because of the wacked out sexual politics.

The only other Heinlein I've read is Stranger in a Strange Land. I got one other Heinlein book at Christmas. Farnham's Freehold ? I'm not at home so I can't check the title.

ganymeder
01-12-2009, 06:34 PM
so do I interpret that as the book gets better? What sexual politics do you mean? I've managed to block out the parts of the book I managed to read... :D

KaliMama
01-12-2009, 06:48 PM
I am almost done with Anathem. I swear.

vegankitty
01-12-2009, 10:49 PM
so do I interpret that as the book gets better? What sexual politics do you mean? I've managed to block out the parts of the book I managed to read... :D

I was kidding in response to nauthiz's comment. It annoys me sometimes but once I start a book I hate to not read it. I wasn't sure what girl you meant dying. I think it's an interesting idea - the first brain transplant goes from a man to a woman. I'm halfway through.

ganymeder
01-13-2009, 08:03 AM
I can't remember her name. The girl who dies and the old man's brain is transplanted into her body. I found her annoying in the beginning, but I took consolation that I wouldn't have to deal with her personality much longer because I figured she would be the one who died. She did, but then she kept talking to the guy anyway because "the body remembers."

I thought the whole brain transplant thing was in an interesting idea too, which is why I picked up the book in the first place. But I just thought it was too bad to subject myself too. I know what you mean about hating to put down a book once you've started it. I hate that too. But I've come to the conclusion that there are more good books that I want to read that I'll never get the time for in my lifetime, so I'm not wasting any more time reading something that I think is badly written. That said, I frequently reread my favorites to get different nuances. Some books, like Flatland (http://manybooks.net/titles/abbottedetext94flat11.html), can be enjoyed on more than one level. :)

ganymeder
01-15-2009, 10:51 AM
Finished Heinlein's Double Star. It was pretty good. Now I'm rereading Stranger in a Strange Land, but it's an earlier edition so it's going to be different. The other copy I read was with hundreds more pages that the editor had originally gotten cut out, so this one will be shorter. I gave away my other copy, so it'll be interesting to compare the differences are between the two.

peaches
01-17-2009, 05:46 PM
currently in non school time im working on no logo by naomi klein and hot, flat, and crowded by thomas friedman... both very good but somewhat heavy. i have to take think breaks which is unusual for my book reading habits

mishka
01-17-2009, 05:50 PM
My cousins bought me The Friday Night Knitting Club and Knit Two books for my birthday so I've decided to read those. They're fluffy and not what I typically read (when I make the time to read) but I'm enjoying the first book.

One of the reviewers calls it "Steel Magnolias but with knitting" which I kinda see.

lamb
01-17-2009, 08:25 PM
I loved Anthem and even moreso The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand, so I'm now working on Atlas Shrugged. It's a long book. Small words. Her writing style takes me longer to read than other books.

Calliope
01-17-2009, 11:20 PM
Ooooh, I loved Atlas Shrugged. Although near the end there's about a 70 page monologue that gets a little tiresome. It's kind of like, ok....you've already spent about 600 pages making your point here......do you really need to drive the nail home anymore? :p

I also liked We the Living, by Rand. If you haven't read that one, I'd recommend it. I believe it's the only book she's written that is set in Russia, and I found it really interesting, because it really gives you a feel for the reason why Rand loves capitalism and selfishness so much.

nauthiz
01-18-2009, 12:26 PM
I just finished Post Office by Charles Bukowski.

It was kind of an Atlas Shrugged for the rest of us.

ganymeder
01-19-2009, 01:15 PM
finished rereading Stranger in a Strange land[ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stranger_in_a_strange_land)/I] last night. I was in tears over Jubal's description of his Rodin pieces. I'm such a sap, but I love it. Just for those few pages alone, the book is worth the price.

Today, going in the opposite direction, I'm starting [I]Bill the Galactic Hero (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_the_Galactic_Hero) on the Planet of the Zombie Vampires. I mean, with a title like that it's got to be good! Plus, I freaking love Harry Harrison!

It's actually book IV of the series, but I'm not worried about it. I've got a few of the books, but when I read the Stainless Steel rat books I read some out of order and it was easy to follow. I should probably start one of the other ones first, but (I have to admit) that the zombie vampire thing in the title has me aching to read it! :D

lisa75
01-19-2009, 02:39 PM
I'm reading "The Complete Guide to Mysterious Beings" by John Keel. It is all about Big foot, sea serpents, aliens and monster sightings.

KaliMama
02-05-2009, 10:35 PM
Today I read The Rabbi's Cat (http://www.amazon.com/Rabbis-Cat-Joann-Sfar/dp/0375714642/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1233894823&sr=1-1).


The preeminent work by one of France's most celebrated young comic artists, The Rabbi's Cat tells the wholly unique story of a rabbi, his daughter, and their talking cat - a philosopher brimming with scathing humor and surprising tenderness.


Rich with the colors, textures, and flavors of Algeria's Jewish community,The Rabbi's Cat brings a lost world vibrantly to life - a time and place where Jews and Arabs coexisted - and peoples it with endearing and thoroughly human characters, and one truly unforgettable cat.

Link (http://www.randomhouse.com/pantheon/graphicnovels/rabbiscat.html).

There's an NPR All Things Considered interview thingy here (http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4805753). I loved this book, and am hoping that my library has the sequel.

I am nearly finished with Dear American Airlines (http://www.amazon.com/Dear-American-Airlines-Jonathan-Miles/dp/0547054017/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1233894580&sr=1-1), which is a hilarious and haunting fictional account of one man's life, mistakes and sorrows written in the form of a letter to an airline while he is stranded at an airport and missing his estranged daughter's wedding.

Recently read: JPod (http://www.amazon.com/JPod-Douglas-Coupland/dp/0747585873/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1233894713&sr=1-1). Hilarious and fun. But I skipped all the run-on bits. I had too.

wildmindgirl
02-05-2009, 10:52 PM
I can't just read one book at a time. I'm strange that way--and I'm a fast reader.

--Injustice For All by J.A. Jance

--The Shack by Wm. Paul Young (My husband and I take turns reading these 2 aloud at night. Until he falls asleep on me and I'm all..."Are you awake??? I'm NOT going to re-read this part to you!"

--Unlimited Power by Tony Robbins (I'm re-reading this--maybe since I'm job searching and I feel the need for a reminder of my potential greatness. Which would probably show up if I could just get a job.)

--The Complete Yoga book by James Hewitt which I'm studying as I'm learning to teach Hatha Yoga to unsuspecting friends who probably think I know exactly what I'm doing.

--Tarot Made Easy (Because hey, I'm all over the place with my reading)

--The Book of Tofu by William Shurtleff and Akiko Aoyagi (I love this book. It's my third copy. I keep reading it and thinking I don't need it anymore and then have to get it again.)

--The Ultimate Uncheese Cookbook by Jo Stepaniak (I think this was where I got the info that started my love affair with nutritional yeast but I'm not sure. I just got it in the mail today. I gave away my old copy. I give EVERYTHING away if it's not nailed down.

--And some delightfully sinful food-porn book on making amazing chocolate vegan cakes and such but I can't find it at the moment. It's packed I think. We're moving tomorrow.

ganymeder
02-06-2009, 04:52 PM
Dubliners by James Joyce (http://manybooks.net/titles/joycejametext01dblnr11.html)

mishka
02-06-2009, 04:56 PM
I just started My Sister's Keeper (http://www.chapters.indigo.ca/books/My-Sisters-Keeper-A-Novel-Jodi-Picoult/9780743454537-item.html) by Jodi Picoult. My sister sent it home with me when I visited during the holidays :heart:


...the emotionally riveting story of a family torn apart by conflicting needs and a passionate love that triumphs over human weakness. Anna is not sick, but she might as well be. By age thirteen, she has undergone countless surgeries, transfusions, and shots so that her older sister, Kate, can somehow fight the leukemia that has plagued her since childhood. …

bekah-chan
02-06-2009, 05:33 PM
i just started reading Frankenstien by Mary Shelley, for school. it's actually pretty good. i'm geeking out and getting all excited about finding all the allusions and connections to her life and hidden messages :)

quagga
02-06-2009, 05:41 PM
--The Book of Tofu by William Shurtleff and Akiko Aoyagi (I love this book. It's my third copy. I keep reading it and thinking I don't need it anymore and then have to get it again.)

:laugh: I thought I was the only one!! I did the same thing -- but I'm only on my second copy. My first was a small paperback, but my second is a full-size copy, and it's so beautiful. When I read it, it makes me want to escape white collar drudgery and open a tofu shop.... *sigh*

Emiloid
02-06-2009, 08:10 PM
I'm working my way through the Newberry Award winners. I recently read Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech. It was amazing! I really almost cried near the end. (I would have, but I had to go to sleep, so I distracted myself.) After I finished it, I had to go back and reread a few parts... it was that good. :yes: I'll probably read it again in full at some point.

Before that, I read The View From Saturday by E.L. Konigsburg, which was also great, but not something I would necessarily recommend as strongly to other adults. I kind of feel like I didn't get part of that one... like it was a little over my head. :laugh: <--Laughing because it's a young adult novel!

wildmindgirl
02-07-2009, 09:13 AM
Miska, what do you think of "My Sister's Keeper?" Good or no? I have an opportunity to borrow it this weekend.

ganymeder
02-07-2009, 05:53 PM
I just started My Sister's Keeper by Jodi Picoult. My sister sent it home with me when I visited during the holidays

What do you think of it so far? I read it for a book club awhile ago, and I think it's one of the best books I've ever read.


i just started reading Frankenstien by Mary Shelley, for school. it's actually pretty good. i'm geeking out and getting all excited about finding all the allusions and connections to her life and hidden messages

This is one of my all time favorite books! The creature's like Hamlet, if Hamlet was a pschotic raging killer bent on revenge... oh wait... :rolleyes: lol

mishka
02-07-2009, 06:01 PM
I'm loving My Sister's Keeper so far, though I've only just started. I felt something for the characters immediately and I look forward to reading it every night though I'm a slow reader and I tend to fall asleep quickly when I read at night.

VegeTexan
02-07-2009, 06:53 PM
5183

ganymeder
02-07-2009, 09:24 PM
LOL @ VT! That's so Perfect!!! :D:laugh:

La Végétalienne
02-09-2009, 11:06 PM
I recently read Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech. That was one of my favorite books for a long time.

bekah-chan
02-09-2009, 11:11 PM
i remember listening to walk two moons on tape in the car with my mom a while back, but i don't remember much of the story :umm:
maybe i should read it again.

have any of you read norwegian wood? i started it and think it just seems like it will make me depressed... but if it's good and worth it i'm going to finish. so, anyone? :)

leia_amos
02-14-2009, 12:41 PM
Lets see...

Comics/Graphic Novels: Fables, Y: The Last Man, Buffy, Angel, Locke & Key

Books/Book Series': Anita Blake series (Laurell K Hamilton), Sookie Stackhouse series (Charlaine Harris)... I get immersed in literature, so when these are done I will find other more scholarly reading pursuits. :silly:

peaches
02-16-2009, 02:14 AM
I just finished the new Censored 2009 and One Big Damn Puzzler which was a really good comment on culture

my recent favorite is on the lower frequency:a secret history of the city an amazing book that is a collection of zines from this guy that lives in san fransisco

KaliMama
02-18-2009, 05:11 PM
The Graveyard Book. :heart: You can watch/listen to Neil Gaiman read it for free...links on my blog (http://www.immolationcentral.com/blog/?p=94).

pluto'scaptive
02-18-2009, 08:38 PM
Dakota by Martha Grimes. It is about a young woman who decides to work in a *shudder* pig farming facility. It was a bit far-fetched with the plot, I thought, but the grittiness and harshness she encounters is all too real.

Emiloid
02-18-2009, 08:42 PM
^ I want to read that!

I just finished The Invention of Hugo Cabret. It was AWESOME! (Wait, do I say that about every book?!?) The book is huge, but it's more than half double-page illustrations, so don't be intimidated! The pictures are wonderful, and the story is flawless, in my opinion. As a bonus, it's very well-researched and based in historical fact, mostly about magicians and early films. There's so much to love about it... it's really an amazing book. :thumbsup:

Waker
02-18-2009, 11:03 PM
Just finished Franny and Zooey (for I think the third time). I don't like dwelling on the accusations that Salinger is some kind of domineering creep, so I'll just assume he's misunderstood. Urine is sterile, damn it. I won't knock it until I've tried it (meaning I'll never knock it).

Been reading The Longest Struggle: Animal Advocacy from Pythagorus to Peta, by Norm Phelps. It's interesting and well-written, but for some reason I've been piecemealing through it.

And started Ex Libris: Confessions of a Common Reader by Anne Fadiman, which is great so far but makes me feel like a meatheaded philistine.

Waker
02-18-2009, 11:05 PM
Dear God, someone give me an edit button so that I don't keep having to post follow-ups in order to acknowledge my typos.

Miso Vegan
02-19-2009, 12:05 AM
^ I want to read that!

I just finished The Invention of Hugo Cabret. It was AWESOME!

I agree - a really well-done book.

bluedawg
02-19-2009, 12:58 AM
Dear God, someone give me an edit button so that I don't keep having to post follow-ups in order to acknowledge my typos.

:silly:

just fyi, if you catch your typo within an hour, there *will* be a visible edit button on your post, and you'll be able to fix it then and there. after an hour, though, the edit button goes away.

Waker
02-19-2009, 03:24 AM
:silly:

just fyi, if you catch your typo within an hour, there *will* be a visible edit button on your post, and you'll be able to fix it then and there. after an hour, though, the edit button goes away.

Thanks. An hour is all I require because as soon as I hit the post button, I remember to proofread...

Dugan
02-19-2009, 06:30 AM
^ I want to read that!
I did read that (Dakota (http://www.marthagrimes.com/html/dakota.html) by Martha Grimes)! I can't remember if I posted about it here. When I returned it to the library, the librarian remarked how she felt conflicted in her opinion about it. She thought it was a good story but found the information about the pigs and pig farming disturbing. I assured her it was most definitely true and didn't come close to scraping the bottom of the disturbing things that happen in such places. I also asked wasn't it better if people knew the impact their choices have on others, in order to make more informed choices. She hemmed and hawed but I think she'd've preferred to go back to blissful ignorance.

This was a sequel to Biting The Moon, which I read afterward. They were easy to follow out of order, though the first did explain how she ended up in Dakota. It too had an AR message. Andi (the main character) is someone KaliMama might like: she rescues coyotes in this book.

The ending of Dakota makes me think there will be another sequel, with another AR message. I don't know anything about the author. Her website (http://www.marthagrimes.com/index.html) has a link for pages to learn more about animal rights. It's also mentioned in an interview (http://www.washingtonian.com/articles/people/8847.html) that the site links to:

Grimes makes almost as many appearances for animal-welfare groups as she does to sign books. “I do Q&As, not readings,” she says. “Hell, they can read the books themselves.” A vegetarian since 1975, she has woven slaughterhouses, puppy mills, and rabbit labs into plots—in her latest, Dakota, the protagonist infiltrates a pig farm—and has donated some of her royalties to animal-welfare groups.

What I've liked especially about the two books is that the AR info is matter of fact. Sometimes when an author includes information about their beliefs into their fiction it can seem preachy. I thought she found a good way to spread the AR message to people who otherwise might not be open to it.

(I've gone on to read a few of her Richard Jury mysteries and don't recall an AR emphasis in those)

ganymeder
02-19-2009, 08:35 AM
On the Road by Kerouac for a book discussion group.

I'm kind of excited about it. I've never read it before.

Miso Vegan
02-19-2009, 10:34 AM
Dear God, someone give me an edit button so that I don't keep having to post follow-ups in order to acknowledge my typos.

Or you can do like the rest of us and ignore even our most egregious typos. :)

pluto'scaptive
02-20-2009, 09:16 AM
This was a sequel to Biting The Moon, which I read afterward. They were easy to follow out of order, though the first did explain how she ended up in Dakota. It too had an AR message. Andi (the main character) is someone KaliMama might like: she rescues coyotes in this book.
I borrowed Biting The Moon from the library and am about half-way through it. :)



The ending of Dakota makes me think there will be another sequel, with another AR message.
Yes, I hope so as well, I am looking forward to it.

kookooforkarma
02-22-2009, 05:46 PM
lol i'm reading "Rendezvous with Rama"

KaliMama
02-22-2009, 06:04 PM
^ I loved that one. Why the lol?

bekah-chan
02-22-2009, 06:31 PM
On the Road by Kerouac for a book discussion group.

I'm kind of excited about it. I've never read it before.

my friend recommended it to me, and about 40 pages into it i had to stop reading. i just couldn't get into it i guess.
don't let my opinion give you a bad impression of the book though, maybe you'll be able to enjoy it unlike myself! let me know what you think of it :)

ganymeder
02-22-2009, 08:22 PM
Well, I'm a couple chapters in so far and like it. His writing style is sort of different, but I sort of like it. At least so far. I like how one day he's on the back of a truck, dead broke, riding with hobos and all sorts of interesting people, and two days later he's dressed up at the opera. It's just... cool. :)

kookooforkarma
02-22-2009, 10:42 PM
cause my boyfriend got me to read it, and i'm still not sure about it yet... maybe i'm skeptical or something. i am going to be open minded about it.

Emiloid
02-22-2009, 11:14 PM
Dakota sounds interesting, but I should have quoted in my response! I really meant I want to read The Graveyard Book. :p

I just finished The Whipping Boy, and tonight I'll probably take a break and read the AAA magazine I just got. Heh. I really liked The Whipping Boy. It's a quick read, very entertaining, and it has some good themes for young adults. I recommend it for anyone, but especially for kids around 8 to 14 or so. In fact, I'm going to make it the next read-aloud book in my class.

In case anyone is curious, I've made it a life goal to read all the Newbery Award books, and I'm busily working on it! So far I've loved most of them. One I didn't care for (The Cat Who Went to Heaven), and there were two that I started and couldn't get into. Maybe I'll try them again once I've exausted the others? The ones I didn't like so much (but maybe put down before they got really good?) were Jacob Have I Loved and MC Higgins the Great. Has anyone read those and loooooved them? Could you convince me to pick them up again? :)

La Végétalienne
02-22-2009, 11:19 PM
I listened to Jacob Have I Loved on tape a few years ago and don't remember being particularly excited by it.

JasperKat
02-25-2009, 09:04 AM
What was Jacob about? I vaugely remember reading it.

-JK

La Végétalienne
02-25-2009, 02:31 PM
It was a reference to the bible. Something about the twins Jacob and Esau and the phrase "Jacob have I loved and Esau have I hated". I think the main character is a twin and feels overshadowed by her sister or something.
Yeah, real helpful, I know.

Emiloid
02-25-2009, 11:42 PM
I couldn't get past the first few pages. It was unappealing and tedious. I bet it gets better... I just wan't interested.

On the other hand, I started reading Maniac Magee the other night and it's fabulous! Seriously, I love it. It's about a kid whose parents pass away when he's young (like 3) and after living with his aunt and uncle for a while he runs away... and keeps on running. I can't wait to see what happens next!

nauthiz
02-25-2009, 11:52 PM
I recently finished Automated Alice by Jeff Noon and Amnesia Moon by Jonathan Lethem.

Both were awesome.

KaliMama
02-25-2009, 11:56 PM
^ Both of those look really good, nauthiz! I just requested them from my library. :thumbsup:

nauthiz
02-26-2009, 12:22 AM
AA might be hard to get into for the first chapter or two, but hang in there!

bekah-chan
02-26-2009, 01:05 AM
my friend is letting me borrow revolutionary road. i haven't seen the movie yet, but he told me it's one of the best books he's ever read :gets all excited:

wildmindgirl
03-01-2009, 10:11 PM
I like hearing everyone's reads. It gives me things to look up at the library. I'm hopeless just picking and chosing on my own. I just finished reading "PS I Love You." It was ok. Kind of a fluff book. No, a fluff book. Just eh. I'm starting "My Sister's Keeper" which has been recommended 3x this week to me and a wonderful book I found in a thrift store called, "If I Had a Hammer...Women's Work in Poetry, Fiction and Photography". Who knew I like poetry? It's been an eye-opener to me anyway.

vegankitty
03-01-2009, 10:40 PM
I'm reading The Complete Idiot's Guide to Hinduism and Dracula Asylum.

ganymeder
03-02-2009, 07:25 AM
I'll add my recommendation as number four for My sister's keeper. I read it for book club a couple years ago, and it's incredible.

Dugan
03-02-2009, 08:08 AM
Margaret Atwood, Oryx and Crake (http://www.amazon.com/Oryx-Crake-Margaret-Atwood/dp/0385721676/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1236002407&sr=8-1). Good. I'd say excellent, but I feel like I missed something somewhere along the way.

Barbara Ehrenreich, Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America (http://www.amazon.com/Nickel-Dimed-Not-Getting-America/dp/0805088385/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1236002479&sr=1-1). non-fiction. A shocking eye-opener. I started living independently on a minimum wage job with no savings at 17. Somehow, I scraped and saved, always had a decent place to live and could pay my bills, even if I went a day or two here and there without food, and *poof* here I am, many years later, a home-owner and not worrying about my next meal, although I'm certainly still conscious about every dollar. I've always maintained that since I did it, why couldn't anyone else? Now I know.

gladcow
03-02-2009, 10:50 AM
I love the book, Dugan. :yes:

I finished Reservation Blues by Sherman Alexie. It was good, but not really what I wanted to read at the mo', so it was kind of slow going.

Now, I'm starting Pikachu's Global Adventure :banana: It's a collection of essays about the Pokemon phenomenon around the globe. :nerd:

nauthiz
03-02-2009, 10:58 AM
I just started Twilight.

There's something amusing about a 500-page novel written in the first person where the main character claims to not be a verbose person on the third page.

gladcow
03-02-2009, 02:31 PM
:laugh:

wildmindgirl
03-02-2009, 09:01 PM
I know this will probably bring razzies my way but I'm more than halfway though Twilight and am not enjoying it. It seems so wordy without much going on to talk about. My son keeps telling me that I have to read ALL of the Twilight books to really appreciate it but I fear I won't even get through this one.

Calliope
03-02-2009, 09:13 PM
:laugh: I haven't read any of the Twilight series, but your post reminds me of what my sister had to say about the books. (She didn't like them either, never got past book two). She said that she found the books boring, and she was really irritated by the overuse of the word 'chagrin" and one other word...which I can't remember at the moment.

Waker
03-02-2009, 09:45 PM
One of my sisters is into those. She said that the good vampires only suck the blood of animals, and as such consider themselves the vegetarians of the vampire community... and consequently their powers are weak because of their "vegetarianish" dietary restrictions.

nauthiz
03-02-2009, 10:47 PM
I'm not far in yet, but so far it just feels like an unpleasant reminder of when I wore all black and listened to Tori Amos and The Cure a lot.

Calliope
03-03-2009, 09:20 AM
:laugh:

hebejeebies
03-03-2009, 11:51 AM
The Sookie Stackhouse books. I :heart: Eric Northman!

ganymeder
03-03-2009, 01:25 PM
One of my sisters is into those. She said that the good vampires only suck the blood of animals, and as such consider themselves the vegetarians of the vampire community... and consequently their powers are weak because of their "vegetarianish" dietary restrictions.

That's just stupid. Everyone knows that the good vampires go to blood banks and use their debit cards to conveniently stock their fridges with O positive. :laugh:

vegankitty
03-03-2009, 05:10 PM
:laugh: I haven't read any of the Twilight series, but your post reminds me of what my sister had to say about the books. (She didn't like them either, never got past book two). She said that she found the books boring, and she was really irritated by the overuse of the word 'chagrin" and one other word...which I can't remember at the moment.

I only read the first one and I don't get the big fuss over them.

And nauthiz , I still wear black and listen to The Cure. :umm:

rick green
03-03-2009, 06:17 PM
McMafia: Something about Globalization and Organized Crime

This book is really cool. Lately I just want to read about gangsters and this has the juice.

Also Art and Its Shadow.

This is an unintentionally hilarious art theory book. It's mercifully thin. I have no idea what the author is going on about, but he's way into mummies, cyborgs, and "the sex appeal of the inorganic." Huh?

nauthiz
03-03-2009, 06:22 PM
And nauthiz , I still wear black and listen to The Cure. :umm:

You might enjoy it more than I did. :)

gladcow
03-03-2009, 06:25 PM
Also Art and Its Shadow.

This is an unintentionally hilarious art theory book. It's mercifully thin. I have no idea what the author is going on about, but he's way into mummies, cyborgs, and "the sex appeal of the inorganic." Huh?

so, he's into mummified cylon vibrators? :silly:

rick green
03-03-2009, 09:01 PM
A good guess...I'm still no sure.

Dugan
03-06-2009, 04:25 PM
Looked for a particular title by Jodi Picoult after seeing mentioned here earlier. It wasn't there so I borrowed Plain Truth instead. It was very good. I look forward to reading more of her books.

gladcow
03-06-2009, 04:55 PM
Only one chaper in and already Pikachu's Global Adventure is SOOOOO goood.

Dugan
03-18-2009, 06:57 AM
Finished Picoult's Her Sister's Keeper yesterday. Excellent, but what a heart wrenching twist at the end. RnR is picking up Automated Alice for me today!

KaliMama
03-18-2009, 09:25 AM
RnR is picking up Automated Alice for me today!

:nauthiz book club twins: :high five:

Finished Amnesia Moon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amnesia_Moon) last night, starting Automated Alice (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automated_Alice) today...

VegeTexan
03-18-2009, 12:04 PM
Great Chefs Cook Vegan by Linda Long

http://www.amazon.com/Great-Chefs-Cook-Vegan-Linda/dp/142360153X/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1237396083&sr=8-1
Most of the recipes are rather complex. The pictures are great. Makes one want to be able to plate like that.
5242

Waker
03-18-2009, 09:23 PM
Only one chaper in and already Pikachu's Global Adventure is SOOOOO goood.

Pokemon is a primer for animal exploitation. Whimsical animals, captured in the wild, forced to live in a tiny pokeball and do battle with other whimsical animals. All for the profit and glory of their human captors.

ganymeder
03-18-2009, 09:43 PM
just finished The Watchmen (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watchmen) (graphic novel) - INCREDIBLE.

ereader: reading The Esperanto Teacher (http://manybooks.net/titles/fryerheletext05esptr10.html)by Helen Fryer
and
ereader: David Copperfield (http://manybooks.net/titles/dickenscetext96cprfd10.html)

audiobook: Slaughterhouse-5 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slaughterhouse-Five)

paperback: Bill, the Galactic Hero on the planet of the zombie vampires (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill,_the_Galactic_Hero)

gladcow
03-18-2009, 10:36 PM
Pokemon is a primer for animal exploitation. Whimsical animals, captured in the wild, forced to live in a tiny pokeball and do battle with other whimsical animals. All for the profit and glory of their human captors.

yeah, it is.

my son is way into it, and I'm enjoying reading about the phenomenom.

Miso Vegan
03-18-2009, 11:10 PM
In paperback, finally (because i've owned it for 15 years): Eva Luna.
On Kindle, when not at home: Sea of Poppies.
To Miso Lite, most nights: Series of Unfortunate Events, Carnivorous Carnival (Book 9).
To Miso Lite and Katiki, on his Weds night sleepovers: Wind in the Willows.

Dugan
03-18-2009, 11:15 PM
What do you think of the Kindle so far?

Waker
03-19-2009, 12:36 AM
yeah, it is.

my son is way into it, and I'm enjoying reading about the phenomenom.

I didn't mean to sound sanctimonious or anything, it was just a reflex response.



I'm reading the Christian Bible, which is a primer for a plethora of unsavory shit. So far I've read Genesis, which is rife with inbreeding, rape and murder.

My favorite bits are when Lot welcomes the angels to his home in Sodom, and a mob forms demanding that they send the angels out so that they may "know them carnally," but Lot offers to send his daughters instead. Later, his daughters get him drunk and rape him so that they may continue his bloodline.

I also like the bit where Jacob's sons convince a rival tribe to circumcise themselves as a precondition to start intermingling and swapping daughters and becoming a single people. But as it turns out, when they're all incapacitated from their bleeding dicks, Jacob's sons storm the place and slaughter everyone--a bloody-dick Trojan Horse strategy, if you will.

Miso Vegan
03-19-2009, 05:07 PM
What do you think of the Kindle so far?

I love it! But the availability of books I want to read is a little disappointing. Not enough to stop me from downloanding 5 books yesterday, however.

KaliMama
03-19-2009, 09:31 PM
Neil Gaiman on the Colbert Report (http://www.colbertnation.com/the-colbert-report-videos/221843/march-16-2009/neil-gaiman).

kookooforkarma
03-19-2009, 09:43 PM
:o slaughterhouse... my first time... :o:yuck:

vegankitty
03-19-2009, 09:46 PM
I love it! But the availability of books I want to read is a little disappointing. Not enough to stop me from downloanding 5 books yesterday, however.

Give me recommendations! I got the iphone version and am on my second book. But I too am having a hard time finding books.

ganymeder
03-20-2009, 06:34 AM
I love it! But the availability of books I want to read is a little disappointing. Not enough to stop me from downloanding 5 books yesterday, however.


I don't know if this helps, since I don't have a kindle, but you can download a ton of free books in all sorts of different formats here (http://manybooks.net//).

Miso Vegan
03-20-2009, 10:42 AM
Thanks for the link, ganymeder! Yes, I can have non-Amazon e-books sent to my Kindle. Someday I'll have time to look around teh internetz for books (like, when I'm not spending all my spare time on VRF), but one advantage of the Kindle is being able to shop their books from the Kindle itself. Another advantage is that only your Amazon-purchased books are stored for you, should you ever delete them from the unit and then want them back. And, finally, I have a gift certificate at Amazon to burn through!

vegankitty, I don't know if these are up your alley, but here's what I have:
Skinny Dip, by Carl Hiaasen
The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society, by Annie Barrows
Lavinia, by Ursula K. Le Guin
Sea of Poppies, by Amitav Ghosh (just started, a bit hard to read but the story is drawing me in)
Sputnik Sweetheart, by Haruki Murakami
Coraline, by Neil Gaiman (for Miso Lite)
Treasure Island, by Robert Louis Stevenson (for Miso Lite)
A Kindle tips-and-tricks book

I'm going to look for other Japanese authors, perhaps more Carl Hiassen, and some Latin American authors next.

bluedawg
03-22-2009, 08:53 PM
h-dawg and i saw dr. t. colin campbell speak on the cruise, and it was pretty amazing. he did a 90-minute talk (some of that time was Q&A) on the scientific evidence for a plant-based diet, and it was rather chilling to watch after learning that my grandma had died about 4 hours before the talk (of cancer), and that my sister had been diagnosed with cancer 2 days earlier. :(

anyhow, i bought the china study as soon as we got home, for my own benefit and also so that i can share what i learn with my sister, who has been a vegetarian for a LONG time but is not vegan (yet). and h-dawg was so intrigued by the statistics, science, and hard evidence of the lecture AND so affected by my sister's diagnosis that he told me he wants to read the book as soon as i am done, and that if he is convinced he will go vegan.

i am BEYOND HYSTERICALLY EXCITED but i am trying not to get my hopes up.

VegeTexan
03-22-2009, 10:41 PM
Finish the book quickly, bluedawg, so you can get it to him.

gladcow
03-23-2009, 11:15 AM
*fingers crossed for hubby dawg*

Miso Vegan
03-23-2009, 11:20 AM
That truly is awesome, bluedawg. Are you sure you need to finish reading it first? :)

I finished Eva Luna last night. Isabel Allende is such a great storyteller.

KaliMama
03-23-2009, 12:39 PM
I could tell that hdawg was thinking about going vegan in the cruise pics. ;)

kao
03-23-2009, 03:49 PM
VeganKen, i'd love a permaculture thread ~ i have only a balcony, and yet want to gather the plan for land,) i'm reading Chuck Palahniuk's ''Haunted'' - my favourite of his is Survivor - the man is kook'd! (& awesomely intelligent*) Neil Gaiman's short stories - Fragile Things - is also filled with the cHange yUor pErspectiV tactics.

4*4*4* Jahgivlove & Jahgivlight

KaliMama
03-23-2009, 06:54 PM
I gave up on Automated Alice after eightysomething pages. It was just too cute for me. :no:

Now I'm reading River of Gods (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/River_of_Gods).

ganymeder
03-23-2009, 07:51 PM
Just starting Imzadi (http://books.simonandschuster.com/9780743420624)tonight.

Dugan
03-24-2009, 07:10 AM
Haven't started Automated Alice yet, turns out it was Modern Vegetarian Kitchen that RnR brought home from the library. Finished another Picoult, Change of Heart. Very good.

Emiloid
03-28-2009, 12:27 AM
I read The Great Brain recently, and have just started Hitty, Her First Hundred Years. It's about a doll who writes her memoirs. It's slow-paced in an old-fashioned sort of way, but an interesting story so far.

I read The Great Brain because I've just seen it around since I was a kid, but never read it. I decided it had been in the background of my life for long enough, and by golly I was going to bring it to the foreground! So I did, and it was really good. I didn't realize how long ago the story took place... I always assumed it was about kids in the 60s or 80s or something, but it takes place in the late 1800s! It was a very good read. :)

nauthiz
03-30-2009, 09:07 AM
I'm not far in yet, but so far it just feels like an unpleasant reminder of when I wore all black and listened to Tori Amos and The Cure a lot.
OK, now I'm a bit further in, and I'd like to revise my assessment: It feels like an unpleasant reminder of when I was an abusive boyfriend.

:umm:

MissLovely
03-30-2009, 09:17 AM
I gave up on Automated Alice after eightysomething pages. It was just too cute for me. :no:

Now I'm reading River of Gods (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/River_of_Gods).

I'm glad to know I'm not alone in giving up on books.


I'm reading jPod by Douglas Coupland. I really like it, except for when he references himself. It makes me feel uncomfortable.

Dugan
03-30-2009, 12:03 PM
I've gotta thank VegeTexan and Nauthiz. I finished infected Saturday. Or maybe it was in the wee hours of Sunday, I couldn't put it down. Started Jeff Noon's Vurt the next day.

foodlovingvegan
03-30-2009, 05:06 PM
what book are you currently reading? what do you think of it? would you recommend it?

i am reading Animal Farm by George Orwell. I am only halfway through, and I am greatly enjoying it. I can't believe I haven't read this already. (so many books to read!) Basically, the animals kick out the abusive farmer and take over. I would definitely recommend it. (as well as 1984 , by the same author)

I love 1984 (it's my favorite book) but I couldn't get into Animal Farm at all.

ganymeder
03-31-2009, 08:05 AM
i am reading Animal Farm by George Orwell. I am only halfway through, and I am greatly enjoying it. I can't believe I haven't read this already. (so many books to read!) Basically, the animals kick out the abusive farmer and take over. I would definitely recommend it. (as well as 1984 , by the same author)


I love 1984, but I wouldn't say that Animal Farm is really a "feel good" book either though. I guess it's just because you haven't finished yet. I'd be interested in your opinion when you finish! Let us know what you thought about it!

gladcow
03-31-2009, 10:49 AM
I'm still working thru the Pokemon essays, but need a bit of easy reading to go with it. At the Dooce signing last night, I picked up The Violet Shyness of Their Eyes, a book about living in Nepal written by a local woman. When mom and I were getting ready to go to Nepal, she read this book but I didn't (I was a 16 yo with an attitude :p) I was pleased to come across it on the shelf and am enjoying it immensly. It is just like I remember Nepal. I also picked up Dooce's book, It Sucked and Then I Cried, which I'll be reading soon. Mmmmmm booooooks :drool:

vegankitty
03-31-2009, 08:41 PM
Pokemon essays?

gladcow
04-01-2009, 11:33 AM
Pokemon essays?

:yes: Pokemon essays (http://books.google.com/books?id=U7hthImoc5AC&dq=pikachu%27s+global+adventure&printsec=frontcover&source=bn&hl=en&ei=FpfTSereFJ7yswPJ1sSFDA&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=4&ct=result)!

hebejeebies
04-01-2009, 12:27 PM
I am reading a novel called Dream Hunter. Its entertaining...

Dugan
04-03-2009, 11:17 AM
Another Picoult, The Tenth Circle (http://www.amazon.com/Tenth-Circle-Novel-Jodi-Picoult/dp/074349671X/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1238775247&sr=8-1). Very good, kept me up late 'cause I kept needing to know what happened next.

I was surprised when I encountered pictures several pages in. Turns out there was a graphic story being written by one of the characters embedded in the book.

Next up: Masson's The Face On Your Plate (http://www.amazon.com/Face-Your-Plate-Truth-About/dp/0393065952/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1238775394&sr=1-1). It caught my eye in the "new arrivals" rack at the library.

jennakirkman
04-03-2009, 02:26 PM
i am reading The Pig Who Sang to the Moon by Jeffrey Moussaeiff Masson. it's about the emotional life of farm animals, and it is well-written and supremely interesting. though i already know most of what he discusses in the book, it refreshes the reasons behind my choice to live a cruelty-free life. i highly recommend it!

JasperKat
04-03-2009, 02:48 PM
I just started Atlas Shrugged. It's been sitting on the bookshelf for years now and I've never bothered with it, but I need a break from dog books. Someone tell me before I get too far into it, worth it?

-JK

Miso Vegan
04-03-2009, 02:58 PM
i am reading The Pig Who Sang to the Moon by Jeffrey Moussaeiff Masson. it's about the emotional life of farm animals, and it is well-written and supremely interesting. though i already know most of what he discusses in the book, it refreshes the reasons behind my choice to live a cruelty-free life. i highly recommend it!

I just saw him speak last night! And he signed that book for me. I was going to start a thread on him soon, because he gave me some interesting insights.

grog
04-03-2009, 03:12 PM
I just started Atlas Shrugged. It's been sitting on the bookshelf for years now and I've never bothered with it, but I need a break from dog books. Someone tell me before I get too far into it, worth it?

-JK

Er...Ayn Rand was a nutter and invented Objectivism. Not sure its worth the effort to read.

VegeTexan
04-04-2009, 12:03 PM
I just finished "Apeshit", a novel of the Bizarro genre and a tribute to 80's 'slasher at summer camp' movies.
5250

Now I'm sixty pages into "Dead Reckoning", a sequel to the original Dawn of the Dead zombie movie.
Can this stuff warp my mind?


.

Calliope
04-04-2009, 12:30 PM
I just started Atlas Shrugged. It's been sitting on the bookshelf for years now and I've never bothered with it, but I need a break from dog books. Someone tell me before I get too far into it, worth it?

-JK


I liked Atlas Shrugged quite a bit, actually. Granted, Grog is right, she's kind of crazy, and sometimes it seems like she just wrote 700 pages driving in one point over and over again. However, I find her philosophy interesting, even if I don't agree with it. And she is a good writer, so I found it enjoyable regardless. There is a 60 page monologue from one character near the end that is a bit over the top, but otherwise, I enjoyed it.

TressaLou
04-04-2009, 02:28 PM
Can this stuff warp my mind?


.

Can a mind that already warped be warped some more...? I think you're probably safe!

VegeTexan
04-04-2009, 02:43 PM
whew


.

ganymeder
04-04-2009, 09:40 PM
LOL :laugh:

I'm started reading David Copperfield (http://manybooks.net/titles/dickenscetext96cprfd10.html)on ereader. I'd never read it before. I want to just shake his stupid mother. Is that NOT VEGAN of me? Ugh.

JasperKat
04-16-2009, 01:22 PM
I'm almost done with Cesar Millan's "Cesar's Way" and I'm suprised by how many things I agree with him on. I still think his training methods are
waaaaaay too aggressive, but some of his theories are sound. I do like that he tells people that dogs are dogs, not furry children, people need to hear that.

-JK

vegankitty
04-16-2009, 02:00 PM
Totally. I see too many people who won't let their big dogs play rough and tumble even when they're clearly enjoying it. I always want to say "let him/her be a dog already!"

Calliope
04-16-2009, 07:32 PM
I picked up 'Gods behaving Badly' by Marie Phillips at a used bookstore. I had never heard of it before, but I ended up reading it in one day, because I was avoiding studying for my math final, and it was just really entertaining.

Basically, all the Olympian Gods (Artemis, Aphrodite, Athena, etc) are all living in modern day london, and for various reasons have day jobs. (Aphrodite is a phone-sex operator.) And one of the greek gods converted to christianity.

All in all the book was hilarious (if a little cheesy at times), and I definitely recommend it to anyone who wants a quick, entertaining read.

nauthiz
04-16-2009, 10:58 PM
I'm in the middle of Benjamin Graham's The Intelligent Investor. So far, I gotta say, wow. If it keeps up like this, then I'd be confident in saying that if you only ever read one book on how to be a capitalist, this is the one.

That, and a lot of what I've read so far reminds me a whole lot of The Book of the SubGenius: Being the Divine Wisdom, Guidance, and Prophecy of J.R. "Bob" Dobbs, High Epopt of the Church of the SubGenius, Here Inscribed for the Salvation of Future Generations and in the Hope that Slack May Someday Reign on this Earth, although admittedly Graham's wisdom somewhat distorted and corrupt by comparison.

thinkingbandit
04-17-2009, 06:03 AM
I just finished "Apeshit", a novel of the Bizarro genre and a tribute to 80's 'slasher at summer camp' movies.
5250



Apeshit is a messed up book. I read it when it came out last year and still feel icky when I think about it.

JasperKat
04-17-2009, 07:38 AM
Apeshit is a messed up book. I read it when it came out last year and still feel icky when I think about it.

I browsed the author's website after VT posted about this book. It looks like some wacky schizz.

I'm also reading "Tell Me Where it Hurts" by Nick Trout, who is an animal surgeon. He talks about euthanasia a bit, and the responsibility that we have to our pets to manage their pain. There are also some funny stories about his patients. His love of animals comes through, I'm liking this book so far.

-JK

KaliMama
04-17-2009, 07:46 AM
"Tell Me Where it Hurts" by Nick Trout

Sounds good!

JasperKat
04-17-2009, 08:51 AM
KM, I thought of you when I picked it out at the library! I think you'd like it :)

-JK

ganymeder
04-19-2009, 01:17 PM
I picked up 'Gods behaving Badly' by Marie Phillips at a used bookstore. I had never heard of it before, but I ended up reading it in one day, because I was avoiding studying for my math final, and it was just really entertaining.

Basically, all the Olympian Gods (Artemis, Aphrodite, Athena, etc) are all living in modern day london, and for various reasons have day jobs. (Aphrodite is a phone-sex operator.) And one of the greek gods converted to christianity.

All in all the book was hilarious (if a little cheesy at times), and I definitely recommend it to anyone who wants a quick, entertaining read.

I've always been a Greek mythology nut. Have you read the Percy Jackson and the Olympian (http://www.percyjacksonbooks.com/)s series? It's YA, but I read the entire series to my little guy (8). Even hubby was hooked!

Oh, yeah, and I started Starship Titanic by Douglas Adams and Terry Jones.
http://www.target.com/gp/detail.html/182-4577634-1531053?asin=0345368436&afid=yahoosspplp_bmvd&lnm=0345368436|Douglas_Adams&#37;27s_Starship_Titanic_ :_Books&ref=tgt_adv_XSNG1060

walrus
04-19-2009, 01:54 PM
I always forget about this thread! I'm currently reading my second David Sedaris book, "Me Talk Pretty One Day." Definitely very funny.

Miso Vegan
04-19-2009, 03:41 PM
I finished Sputnik Sweetheart by Haruki Murakami. I did not like it nearly as much as the others of his I've read (Wind-up Bird, Kafka...) and would say it's not worth reading except that makes it sound bad. It's not bad, I enjoyed it. It just isn't one of his better books, and thus not worth reading.

I am now reading Skinny Dip by Carl Hiassen. He usually write fictional stories that take place in Florida, and a large part of his fiction is based on true events. I haven't put my finger on why, but it's very strange to me as a native Floridian (and hater Floridian) to read stories that take place in Florida. Especially those that describe the flora, as well as the seedy underbelly. For one, it's weird to read about no-name backwater towns that you actually lived in, but then to read about crimes that were probably going on while you lived there? And then to read about the totally surreal world that is the Everglades.... I don't know, I had the same feeling when I read The Orchid Thief. One thing that struck me is that I have a new understanding of Florida, based on having someone else describe it. Before, palm trees, swamps and Spanish moss were just the (uninteresting) background of my life - oppressive heat was the foreground. Now, reading other people's descriptions, I find myself thinking, "oh, yeah, I suppose the Everglades are totally mysterious and bizarrely organic and completely unique on the planet and I could see why tourists would find it worth visiting...."

eta: I'm reading both on my Kindle. Have I mentioned how much I love my Kindle?

Calliope
04-19-2009, 03:48 PM
I've always been a Greek mythology nut. Have you read the Percy Jackson and the Olympian (http://www.percyjacksonbooks.com/)s series? It's YA, but I read the entire series to my little guy (8). Even hubby was hooked!


I haven't read those, I may have to keep an eye out. You should definitely check out God's behaving Badly though, it was pretty interesting. :)


I always forget about this thread! I'm currently reading my second David Sedaris book, "Me Talk Pretty One Day." Definitely very funny.

I :heart: that book.

"On the final day of the year, my family and I eat marine life and take the pine tree down from the living room." :laugh:

JasperKat
04-19-2009, 07:31 PM
Miso, have you read any Tim Dorsey (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Dorsey)? I have one of his books (Hammerhead Ranch Motel, I think) on my Sony Reader but haven't started it yet. All of his books are based in Florida.

-JK

Miso Vegan
04-19-2009, 08:55 PM
No, I haven't. Let me know how you like it. I don't really seek out Floridian authors (else I might have already read some Randy Wayne White since he bought our house when we moved in 1986).

ganymeder
04-21-2009, 09:49 AM
I haven't read those, I may have to keep an eye out. You should definitely check out God's behaving Badly though, it was pretty interesting. :)


I just ordered it from Paperbackswap.com. Yay!:banana:

MissLovely
04-21-2009, 09:57 AM
I finished Sputnik Sweetheart by Haruki Murakami. I did not like it nearly as much as the others of his I've read (Wind-up Bird, Kafka...For one, it's weird to read about no-name backwater towns that you actually lived in, but then to read about crimes that were probably going on while you lived there? And then to read about the totally surreal world that is the Everglades.... I don't know, I had the same feeling when I read The Orchid Thief. One thing that struck me is that I have a new understanding of Florida, based on having someone else describe it. Before, palm trees, swamps and Spanish moss were just the (uninteresting) background of my life - oppressive heat was the foreground. Now, reading other people's descriptions, I find myself thinking, "oh, yeah, I suppose the Everglades are totally mysterious and bizarrely organic and completely unique on the planet and I could see why tourists would find it worth visiting...."


I've been in that mind space a lot lately about the PNW.

Miso Vegan
04-21-2009, 10:15 AM
Yeah? I certainly find Florida's geography far weirder than PNW. Oh, wait, you probably mean the feeling of reading about PNW in books, how others describe the region...

stegan
04-21-2009, 10:35 AM
I just finished "Liberation: Being the Adventures of the Slick Six After the Collapse of the United States of America (http://powells.com/biblio/7-9780765320469-0)" by Brian Francis Slattery. It's labeled as "science fiction", but it isn't in the traditional sense, although it does depict a dystopian future. It's about a group of super-criminals who profited greatly before the fall of the US dollar, and their quest to reunite and take down the self declared ruler of the new world that formed in the aftermath. Anarchy, mysticism, bloodshed, and retribution ensue. With a semi-happy ending.

Except it's not that simple a book; the characters are well-developed, the language is complex and musical and it never really slows down for a breath. And it's impossible to put down once you get sucked in. Really, really good stuff.

ganymeder
04-22-2009, 05:54 PM
I just finished "Liberation: Being the Adventures of the Slick Six After the Collapse of the United States of America (http://powells.com/biblio/7-9780765320469-0)" by Brian Francis Slattery. It's labeled as "science fiction", but it isn't in the traditional sense, although it does depict a dystopian future.

Yeah, some stuff that's labeled Scifi I don't really get. Just finished Slaughterhouse 5 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slaughterhouse-Five) on audio, and it was supposedly scifi because he goes back and forth to a zoo on a distant planet between stints during WWII. But it just didn't come across like that, more like he was just nuts. I didn't really consider it scifi, but that's only my opinion.

I finished Starship Titanic and just started The End of Eternity (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_End_of_Eternity) by Asimov.

KaliMama
04-22-2009, 06:54 PM
"Liberation: Being the Adventures of the Slick Six After the Collapse of the United States of America (http://powells.com/biblio/7-9780765320469-0)" by Brian Francis Slattery.

That sounds like something I'd enjoy... but my library doesn't have it. :brood:

:idea: Interlibrary loan, here I come!

oldradical
04-22-2009, 07:04 PM
For sci-fi, I've found I like most anything by Greg Bear.

Today I finished A Blue Hand: The Beats in India, which was about the culture, events, and relationships of a number of the beatniks just before, during, and then after Ginsberg became famous for "Howl." It is substantially--though not exclusively--focused on the (literal) journey of Ginsberg and some others to India (and not only there). Though the paperback version has a sensationalistic subtitle, the book itself is actually pretty substantive...it's not "trash biography," but sensitively written. It has moments of tenderness, repulsion, poignancy, and sorrow--just like real life. I think it's well worth the time, if the subject matter interests you at all.

Dugan
04-23-2009, 09:17 AM
That sounds like something I'd enjoy... but my library doesn't have it. :brood:

:idea: Interlibrary loan, here I come!
Same here.

From earlier, I didn't get Automated Alice but tried Noone's Vurt instead. I had a hard time getting into it and stopped trying about 1/4 of the way in. I've removed the former from my loan requests.

ganymeder
04-23-2009, 09:39 AM
I love libraries.

My local library is pretty small, but they can get most stuff for me through interlibrary loans. A couple times they haven't been able to and they've actually BOUGHT the material I requested (Doctor Who: season 1). I mean, they ROCK. :thumbsup:

stegan
04-23-2009, 10:43 AM
That sounds like something I'd enjoy...

Actually, I thought that as I was reading it. :) You can read the first chapter, and hear him read some passages at his website- http://www.bfslattery.com/fiction.html

KaliMama
04-23-2009, 11:47 AM
NIce! Thanks, stegan.

JasperKat
04-25-2009, 02:51 PM
Finished up The Elfish Gene: Dungeons, Dragons and Growing Up Strange. I thought it was quite funny, and much more interesting than I (a non-player) assumed a book about D&D would be. Can't say I understood some of the terms, but I didn't need to.

Next up I have For the Love of a Dog. :)

Has anyone read When Elephants Weep? I'm considering it as a Mother's Day gift for my mom but some of the reviews say that it's dry and the anecdotes are too short to be interesting. She loves elephants. Her reading for pleasure time is limited (whose isn't :rolleyes:), and I know she won't slog through something that's mostly dry facts and scientific theories.

-JK

VeganVigilante
04-25-2009, 05:05 PM
I'm finishing up Fast Food Nation.

Skinny Bitch and The Dreaded Comparison: Human and Animal Slavery are great reads. ;)

ganymeder
05-08-2009, 12:40 PM
Just started The Iron Heel (http://manybooks.net/titles/londonjaetext98irnhl10.html) by Jack London, sort of as a complimentary read to 1984 (which I just finished).

ganymeder
05-08-2009, 03:08 PM
Oh, almost forgot! I also just started (paperback) Gods behaving badly. (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?r=1&ISBN=9780316067621&ourl=Gods%2DBehaving%2DBadly%2FMarie%2DPhillips) The protagonist uses a Palm Pilot, so I already love it. ;)

Emiloid
05-08-2009, 11:01 PM
I just started reading The Blind Watchmaker by Richard Dawkins. I'm a big fan of his already, and I'm really enjoying the book so far.

Calliope
05-08-2009, 11:05 PM
Oh, almost forgot! I also just started (paperback) Gods behaving badly. (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?r=1&ISBN=9780316067621&ourl=Gods&#37;2DBehaving%2DBadly%2FMarie%2DPhillips) The protagonist uses a Palm Pilot, so I already love it. ;)

Yay!!! I just read that a few weeks ago!! It's excellent. :)

ETA: My brain died for a second there...you know I read that....we talked about it......:p
It's bedtime for Calliope.....

La Végétalienne
05-08-2009, 11:24 PM
It's bedtime for Calliope.....
You sure about that? (http://www.veganrepresent.com/forums/showpost.php?p=374149&postcount=5) ;)

Calliope
05-08-2009, 11:53 PM
Funny story....I'm still awake..... :p

foodlovingvegan
05-09-2009, 12:32 AM
Funny story....I'm still awake..... :p

Same here. I have really got to get to sleep!

ganymeder
05-09-2009, 09:06 AM
Yay!!! I just read that a few weeks ago!! It's excellent. :)
.

Well, I ordered it through PBS because I read about it on this thread! ;)

michiganveganchick
05-09-2009, 09:44 AM
I've seen the movie about a kazillion times, and now I'm finally getting around to reading The Princess Bride. :smitten:

hebejeebies
05-09-2009, 09:53 AM
I am reading Lover Avenged. Its gooooooood

Miso Vegan
05-09-2009, 10:05 AM
Cutting for Stone. It's set in a Catholic hospital in mid-century Ethiopia, and so far the book has been leading up to the narrator's birth. I like the story, and although the writing is not exceptional, it's a pretty good read.

Dugan
05-13-2009, 11:07 PM
I just finished "Liberation: Being the Adventures of the Slick Six After the Collapse of the United States of America (http://powells.com/biblio/7-9780765320469-0)" by Brian Francis Slattery... And it's impossible to put down once you get sucked in. Really, really good stuff.
I was drawn in to borrowing this from the library on the interesting name alone. Started it last night. The writing style was a bit atypical and disjointed but easy enough to adjust to. Got sucked in and was up until about 2:30a finishing it. I tried to put it down around midnight but couldn't get to sleep. Some pieces don't seem all that far fetched.

RnR tried to bring it back to the library today. During some down time he started looking at it... and read the first 120 pages. He's renewed it and plans to read it himself. I didn't think it'd be anything he'd care for in the slightest. We discussed it some while dog walking tonight. He doesn't care for The Vibe - smacks too much of a deux ex machina (sp?).

ETA: ordered another of his, Spaceman's Blues. Eagerly waiting.

Svartalfheim
05-14-2009, 06:41 AM
The Pale Horseman by Bernard Cornwell

The second book in the series "The Saxon Tales". I love it.

KaliMama
05-21-2009, 10:21 PM
I just finished The Caryatids (http://www.amazon.com/Caryatids-Bruce-Sterling/dp/0345460626/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1242961779&sr=8-1). Built on a really good premise, but weak in places and lacking in character development. Finishing it got to be a chore. However, it made for an interesting prelude to another postapocalyptic adventure: Liberation: Being the Adventures of the Slick Six After the Collapse of the United States of America (http://www.amazon.com/Liberation-Adventures-Collapse-United-America/dp/0765320460/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1242961847&sr=1-1), which I'm reading now. THANK YOU SO MUCH for turning me on to this one, stegan! I am mesmerized and amused and jazzed and horrified! It's quite the ride. :yes:

I also just started reading Zoontologies (http://www.amazon.com/Zoontologies-Question-Animal-Cary-Wolfe/dp/0816641064/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1242962315&sr=1-1), edited by Cary Wolfe. The first essay is by Wolfe and is titled "Forms of Language, Forms of Life: Wittgenstein, Cavell, and Hearne." I have an enormous appreciation and deep affection for the late Vicki Hearne, so this was an almost too-good-to-be-true wonderful surprise. :heart: I have Animal Rites (http://www.amazon.com/Animal-Rites-American-Discourse-Posthumanist/dp/0226905144/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1242962315&sr=1-2) lined up next after this one.

Emiloid
05-22-2009, 12:36 AM
I'm reading The Friday Night Knitting Club, which I got as a gift. So far I like, but it's kind of weird.,.. I find myself deliberately trying to ignore the references to wool and angora (etc.) in order to enjoy the story. Funny how simply bringing up animal-sourced products can make me slightly angry, or at least frustrated, even in a fictional book. :umm: I just wish it weren't so commonplace to abuse animals, or to use the products of their abuse. (Same difference to me, which is why I'm vegan.)

Despite this, the story is pretty good, once I got into it. I keep staying up too late each night, reading. That's probably a good sign. :)

I had a similar problem reading Hitty: Her First Hundred Years. I liked the book a LOT, but there was a long stretch where the protagonist (a doll) was on a whaling ship. It was written decades ago, and that part of the story was set even longer ago... so of course there was no critical commentary on whaling. If I ever read the book to my class, I hope I can interject some kind of modern perspective on whaling. At least get them thinking.

It's weird how being vegan can interfere (not necessarily in a bad way) with enjoying normal life. I don't even think about it most of the time, but then, every so often, there are books or TV shows or conversations that point out how disconnected from normal society I am. :umm:

vegankitty
05-23-2009, 12:30 PM
I just finished reading the Twilight series. The first time I read Twilight I didn't like it but since I'm running a vampire book club I thought I should re-read it. And this time I really liked it and and read alll the others. I also got to enjoy reading them on my iphone kindle app which I love-one less thing to carry everyday.

I am now reading Anathem by Neal Stephenson.

KaliMama
05-23-2009, 03:02 PM
I am now reading Anathem by Neal Stephenson.

:heart: Long, long, long. I liked it and all of its crazy made-up words.

I have a Twilight question. Isn't there a good vampire/bad vampire dichotomy, with the "good" vampires living off of animals instead of other humans? And how do vegans feel about that when reading the books? (I haven't read them, and have no plans to do so.)

It bothers me.

vegankitty
05-23-2009, 03:56 PM
It bothered me-especially in the first book when they compare it to a "bland" human vegetarian diet of tofu and soymilk, :rolleyes:

But it's fiction so not so much. It's not until the last book they talk about actually hunting detail in any detail. I didn't like those scenes. I didn't really find it any worse really than a book where the people eat meat. :shrug:

steroidicalkiwi
05-24-2009, 02:31 PM
nobody belongs here more than you by miranda july

....this might be my fifth time reading it...mayhaps :D

gladcow
05-24-2009, 04:11 PM
I'm reading B is for Beer, the new Tom Robbins book.

:banana:

I'm also reading, or about to read:
- Reefer Madness by Schlosser
- Take the Cannoli by Vowell
- Righteous Indignation by Rose,Kaiser and Klein

ganymeder
05-24-2009, 06:03 PM
I've sort of off again/on again been writing a story about a vegan vampire, and she drinks donated human blood from a blood bank. Consentually given (not necessarily to her but...)and she gets all her vitamins. :D

KaliMama
05-24-2009, 06:08 PM
I like that idea way better than having them drink animals' blood. I mean really, vegans, haven't we been over this?! :brood: :p Don't hate me, Anne Rice & Twilight fans!

TressaLou
05-24-2009, 09:31 PM
I just finished My Sister's Keeper. It was good, and bitter-sweet, and interesting from a counselor's perspective. I probably won't see the movie because I can't imagine how it would do the book any justice.

vegankitty
05-24-2009, 10:01 PM
I like that idea way better than having them drink animals' blood. I mean really, vegans, haven't we been over this?! :brood: :p Don't hate me, Anne Rice & Twilight fans!

In the Charlaine Harris books (True Blood) the good vamps drink synthetic blood or from willing humans and not until they die. On that show Moonlight the vampire drank blood bank blood.

christina1
05-27-2009, 06:38 AM
Right now I am reading Blade Runner.

KaliMama
05-27-2009, 01:18 PM
:confused:

nauthiz
05-27-2009, 01:23 PM
:confused:

I think maybe she meant Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Do_Androids_Dream_of_Electric_Sheep%3F) by Philip K. Dick.

KaliMama
05-27-2009, 01:27 PM
I hope so. I :heart: PKD.

Miso Vegan
06-02-2009, 11:39 AM
I started Cartwheels in a Sari (http://www.redroom.com/publishedwork/cartwheels-a-sari-a-memoir-growing-up-cult), about the Sri Chinmoy cult. I'll never eat at Silence Heart Nest (http://www.silenceheartnest.com/) again.

squirrel
06-02-2009, 11:55 AM
I'm reading the Harry Potter series. :p Never read them before. Then my friend borrowed me the first Twillight book, plus I also have The Secret Life of Bees that I got as a gift..

Emiloid
06-02-2009, 12:52 PM
I just finished The Friday Night Knitting Club. Someone gave it to me as a gift, probably because I knit. :p I thought it was good, but not great. Good characters... a plot that is more about self-discovery than action... the ending fizzled for me, but maybe I was too tired when I read that part? From a vegan perspective, it was at first a little jarring to read about wool wool wool silk wool silk wool wool wool. Maybe like going out to eat with non-vegans when you've been cooking at home for a long time? Anyway, after the first chapter or so, I got used to it.

I also just started Because of Winn-Dixie. I'm only a few pages into it, but so far I really like it. Of course, I have a thing for young adult/children's literature. :)

gladcow
06-02-2009, 12:55 PM
I started Cartwheels in a Sari (http://www.redroom.com/publishedwork/cartwheels-a-sari-a-memoir-growing-up-cult), about the Sri Chinmoy cult. I'll never eat at Silence Heart Nest (http://www.silenceheartnest.com/) again.

oh? the husb and I ate at a Sri Chinmoy restaurant in SF, and were planning to go there again this fall. I'll take your word for it that it's best to skip them. I'm not down with the cults, anyway.

squirrel
06-02-2009, 02:23 PM
I also just started Because of Winn-Dixie. I'm only a few pages into it, but so far I really like it. Of course, I have a thing for young adult/children's literature. :)
Years ago when I had to go to a physical therapist for a foot issue, they had a copy of it in their waiting room. I found myself liking it, and would read a bit every time I went in there...but then I stopped going, and didn't go buy it after that. I wish I would have. Let us now how it is! :)

TressaLou
06-02-2009, 07:09 PM
I'm reading the Harry Potter series. :p Never read them before. Then my friend borrowed me the first Twillight book, plus I also have The Secret Life of Bees that I got as a gift..

I love, love, love the Harry Potter series. I hope you do too! And I read the secret life of beas last summer, and I really enjoyed it. Happy reading!

Miso Vegan
06-02-2009, 07:52 PM
oh? the husb and I ate at a Sri Chinmoy restaurant in SF, and were planning to go there again this fall. I'll take your word for it that it's best to skip them. I'm not down with the cults, anyway.

I'll let you know more when I finish the book.

Dugan
06-03-2009, 06:52 AM
Liberation: Being the Adventures of the Slick Six After the Collapse of the United States of America (http://www.amazon.com/Liberation-Adventures-Collapse-United-America/dp/0765320460/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1242961847&sr=1-1), which I'm reading now. THANK YOU SO MUCH for turning me on to this one, stegan! I am mesmerized and amused and jazzed and horrified! It's quite the ride. :yes:

I started another of Slattery's, Spaceman Blues: A Love Song (http://www.amazon.com/Spaceman-Blues-Brian-Francis-Slattery/dp/B001O9CHNY/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1244029035&sr=8-1) but it's tough to want to keep reading it. Slick is disjointed in good way, a way that I became accustomed to as I read the book. It took a few chapters but once I was there, the style wasn't distracting me from the story any more. Spaceman is also disjointed, but not in a good way and in a different style from Slick. I don't know that I could say that the story is less compelling than Slick's or whether the style makes me feel less compelled to go on with reading it. Despite not caring for Spaceman, I'm interested to see what this author will do next.

ganymeder
06-03-2009, 12:18 PM
Just started "Blindsight"...It's weird. If I told you the plot, it'd sound stupid, but it's actually written really well. I can't wait to find out what happens!

http://manybooks.net/titles/wattspother06Blindsight.html

lenni
06-03-2009, 11:07 PM
I LOVE Harry Potter! I'm a sucker for fairy tales, and that's really what they are. I'm lucky to have my brother, who is a bigger nerd than I, to always buy the books. When the last one came out I went on a marathon and read all of them in order before the last one :p

I started a couple of days ago and am midway through Coming Up for Air by George Orwell. I've had it knocking around forever and never got around to reading it...but Orwell is my favorite author and I've read quite a few of his books more than once (and two of my tattoos reference 1984).

Finally: summertime :cool: and I have time to read more than schoolwork and the odd newspaper.

lenni
06-03-2009, 11:11 PM
Just started "Blindsight"...It's weird. If I told you the plot, it'd sound stupid, but it's actually written really well. I can't wait to find out what happens!

I think that about King Lear, which is my favorite Shakespeare play. I think the story sounds totally boring if it's summarized, but the work itself is incredible.

I guess that's why we aren't the authors...we can't describe it the way they can :envy:

gladcow
06-04-2009, 12:20 AM
finished B is for Beer

it was so great. I love the way Robbins tells a story. and, the cover is right. It really is a children's book for adults and an adult's book for children. the boy is going to read it. but the husb is first :)

ganymeder
06-04-2009, 11:23 AM
I think that about King Lear, which is my favorite Shakespeare play. I think the story sounds totally boring if it's summarized, but the work itself is incredible.

I guess that's why we aren't the authors...we can't describe it the way they can :envy:

I'm actually not a fan of King Lear... sorry. I'm more of a Hamlet sort of gal. ;)

lenni
06-04-2009, 12:36 PM
I'm actually not a fan of King Lear... sorry. I'm more of a Hamlet sort of gal. ;)

Hamlet is, of course, great...but I think it's a bit overrated (gasp!). Ok, maybe not overrated...but I think King Lear is underrated.

My hs AP English teacher (who was one of the most incredible teachers I've ever had, better than most college professors I've had) said that every age/era has a Shakespeare play that speaks to it and it's emotions and motives and way of life/looking at the world. He said Hamlet was the play for the 20th century, and that he thought King Lear would be the one for the 21st...I haven't read Lear in awhile, but I mean to pick it up soon because I think I might figure out exactly what he meant by that.

Also, I found a King Lear graphic novel at Half Priced Books a few months ago...I'm not into graphic novels but it's awesome anyway. :D

grog
06-04-2009, 03:11 PM
Blow winds blow!

KaliMama
06-04-2009, 04:33 PM
Also, I found a King Lear graphic novel at Half Priced Books a few months ago...I'm not into graphic novels but it's awesome anyway. :D

Which one? Link pls? :silly:

lenni
06-04-2009, 04:52 PM
http://www.amazon.com/King-Lear-Graphic-Shakespeare-Library/dp/1579126170/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1244152047&sr=8-1

Check out the bottom w/"customers who bought this also bought..."

Looks like many Shakespeare graphic novels are around. We should have figured, but who thinks of these things? Certainly not people like me, mentally living a few hundred years ago ;)

:smitten: to romance...sigh.

ganymeder
06-04-2009, 04:56 PM
I dunno. I sort of feel Lear is overrated, so I guess our opinions even out. :)

As far as tradgedies go, I love Hamlet and (not Shakespeare) but Cyrano de Bergerac. I don't read French, but I love the several English translations I've read, plus the English and French movies. Cyrano makes Hamlet look like a comedy. At least in Hamlet, everyone that died either deserved it or wanted to anyway (except poor Ophelia who went insane).

lenni
06-04-2009, 05:17 PM
I saw Cyrano performed once, amateurish but still incredible.

And I like Hamlet a lot, it's just not my favorite :)

Dugan
06-04-2009, 05:20 PM
I started another of Slattery's, Spaceman Blues: A Love Song (http://www.amazon.com/Spaceman-Blues-Brian-Francis-Slattery/dp/B001O9CHNY/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1244029035&sr=8-1) but it's tough to want to keep reading it.
I finished it. Not impressed, would not recommend it. If I hadn't read Slick Six first, I would have no further interest in reading this author's work. However, my enjoyment of Slick Six far outweighed my disappointment with Spaceman Blues.

Svartalfheim
06-05-2009, 09:02 AM
Third book of The Saxon Tales
Lords of the North by Bernard Cornwell

But today I will be reading Barron's SAT 2009 24th Edition because the big test is tomorrow and I need to study. -_____-;;

VegeTexan
06-07-2009, 12:37 PM
I'm halfway through a strange one. Vegan Nation is a novelette by R. Allan Bogle and is about an animal rights activist serial killer who tortures and kills vivisectors.
Interesting and sometimes graphic read.


http://www.amazon.com/Vegan-Nation-R-Allan-Bogle/dp/144149765X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1244396178&sr=8-1

VegeTexan
06-07-2009, 04:09 PM
Finished. Vegan Nation is a short book at 75 pages, but a fun read.
I just discovered it is available free as an html doc at this address...
http://www.reachoutpub.com/VeganNation.html

deadlyhead
06-07-2009, 05:06 PM
Liberation: Being the Adventures of the Slick Six After the Collapse of the United States of America, by Brian Francis Slattery.

Every high school in the US should have this book as required reading. Slattery is an economics journalist by day, and his understanding of the mechanisms of Capitalism makes for a chilling and all-too-realistic read.

KaliMama
06-07-2009, 05:07 PM
Gun, with Occasional Music (http://www.amazon.com/Gun-Occasional-Music-Harvest-Book/dp/0156028972/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1244411938&sr=8-1). nauthiz turned me onto Jonathan Lethem with Amnesia Moon (http://www.amazon.com/Amnesia-Moon-Jonathan-Lethem/dp/015603154X/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpi_12), and I am loving this one a lot! It's a detective novel with a noir tone, set in a SF future where both the printed word and the asking of questions (by anyone other than a licensed Inquisitor) have been outlawed. It's a good read, occasionally hilarious, and a good follow-up to Liberation (http://www.amazon.com/Liberation-Adventures-Collapse-United-America/dp/0765320460/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1244412278&sr=1-1), which I finished and passed along to d (see above.)

nauthiz
06-07-2009, 07:31 PM
Hey, I just started Girl In Landscape. I'm hooked too.

Chijou_no_seiza
06-07-2009, 08:52 PM
I'm reading the Chronicles of Amber, book 5 - The Courts of Chaos by Roger Zelazny. Thanks to grog, it's awesome!

VegeTexan
06-07-2009, 09:32 PM
hey, anyone want Vegan Nation for the cost of postage?
If more than two of you want it, please offer a Lara Bar or a progressive metal cd or something and I will decide who to mail it to.

KaliMama
06-09-2009, 03:53 AM
Hey, I just started Girl In Landscape. I'm hooked too.

:knucklebump:

nauthiz
06-09-2009, 12:02 PM
ow. my knuckles.

KaliMama
06-09-2009, 02:59 PM
SORRY I DON'T KNOW MY OWN STRENGTH

Miso Vegan
06-21-2009, 10:52 AM
I just finished The Help. It's a fictional story about the black women who worked as housekeepers in the homes of white people in Mississippi, and the racism of that system. I think the time period was the 1960s. For the first 1/3, I thought it was made to make modern white people feel good about their comparative lack of racism, like, "wow, those people back then were so racist! I'm nothing like them!" But then the story arc developed into a bit of a sit-of-your-pants tale. It's worth reading, if you like historical fiction.

Dugan
06-21-2009, 11:05 AM
Neal Stephenson's Snow Crash (http://www.amazon.com/Snow-Crash-Bantam-Spectra-Book/dp/0553380958/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1245600102&sr=8-1)

bekah-chan
06-21-2009, 12:21 PM
i'm finishing brave new world now, and i just finished never let me go, which was really really really good!

Oatmeal Girl
06-21-2009, 03:26 PM
I'm going to start The China Study soon!

squirrel
06-22-2009, 11:31 AM
I'm on the 4th Harry Potter book. :) They get bigger as they go!

tin can
06-22-2009, 11:32 AM
yeah - at first I thought they contained all the previous books at the beginning as well. ;)

squirrel
06-22-2009, 11:38 AM
You know, they do talk about the previous book a lot, and that kind of annoys me. It's like "I started from the beginning, and I already know about that, get to the current stuff!" :laugh: But I guess maybe some people don't start with the first book, maybe on accident, and in the beginning, not all of the books were out soon after the previous one, so people may have forgotten and it's better if stuff is explained. :shrug: I'm reading them one right after the other, so I remember everything. But maybe the books would be smaller if they didn't add a lot of the previous books' stuff...

MissLovely
06-22-2009, 11:39 AM
I just read Girlfriend in a Coma. I'm always a Douglas Copeland fan. My absolute favorite is Miss Wyoming.
Girlfriend's clunky 70's canadian slang was difficult to forge through for me, and when it turned appocolyptic I wasn't engrossed enough to care all that much.
All in all, though, I don't regret reading it.

VegeTexan
06-22-2009, 02:01 PM
I just started Relentless, the new one by Dean Koontz, my favorite author. http://www.deankoontz.com/

Dean excels in writing from a dog's point of view, having had a great relationship with his golden retriever, Trixie. One of the first books I read by Koontz was Watchers which was about a genetically altered member of that species who was enhanced for intelligence. Thankfully his new book has a dog as a central charactor.

5401


I just found this at wiki about Trixie and thought you might like to see this...



One of Dean Koontz's pen names was inspired by his dog, Trixie Koontz, a golden retriever, shown in many of his book-jacket photos. Originally a service dog with Canine Companions for Independence (CCI), a charitable organization that provides service dogs for people with disabilities

Trixie was a gift from CCI in gratitude of the Koontz's substantial donations, totalling $2,500,000 between 1991 and 2004. Koontz was taken with the charity while he was researching his novel Midnight, a book which included a CCI-trained dog, a black Labrador retriever named Moose.

In 2004 when Koontz wrote and edited Life Is Good: Lessons in Joyful Living in her name and in 2005, Koontz wrote a second book credited to Trixie, Christmas Is Good. Both books are written from a supposed canine perspective on the joys of life. The royalties of the books were donated to Canine Companions for Independence.

In 2007, Trixie contracted terminal cancer creating a tumor in her heart. The Koontzes had her put to sleep outside of their family home on June 30. After Trixie's death, Koontz has continued writing on his website under Trixie's names, in "TOTOS", standing for Trixie on the Other Side.

It is widely thought that Trixie was his inspiration for his November 2007 book The Darkest Evening of the Year, about a woman who runs a golden retriever rescue home, and who rescues a 'special' dog, named Nickie, who eventually saves her life. In August of 2009, Dean will publish "A Big Little Life", a memoir of his life with Trixie.

In October 2008 Koontz released he had adopted a new dog, Anna. It was eventually learned that Anna was the grandniece of Trixie.

squirrel
06-22-2009, 02:26 PM
Koontz refers to Goldens a lot in his books. And he almost always has the main character calling the dog "fur face." :heart:

ganymeder
06-23-2009, 07:11 AM
The Everything Guide to writing a novel.

JasperKat
06-26-2009, 09:27 AM
I just started Relentless, the new one by Dean Koontz, my favorite author.

I've got a handful of Koontz books that you're welcome to if you want them!
I've already reread them a few times so now they're just taking up room on the bookshelf.

-JK

VegeTexan
06-26-2009, 11:13 AM
I've got a handful of Koontz books that you're welcome to if you want them!
I've already reread them a few times so now they're just taking up room on the bookshelf.

-JK

Thanks, JK, but I've got a copy of everything he's written. :)

Calliope
06-26-2009, 03:58 PM
Watchers was one of the first books I ever read by Dean Koontz too!!! I read it in middle school and it made me cry. :cry: It was good though! :p

ganymeder
06-26-2009, 07:26 PM
I haven't read all his books, but I really enjoyed "Lightning." (http://www.deankoontz.com/books/lightning/)

Emiloid
06-26-2009, 07:55 PM
I'm reading Models Don't Eat Chocolate Cookies by Erin Dionne. So far I'm really enjoying it. I'll write more later. Right now I'm just on a break from reading it. ;)


Dean excels in writing from a dog's point of view, having had a great relationship with his golden retriever, Trixie. One of the first books I read by Koontz was Watchers which was about a genetically altered member of that species who was enhanced for intelligence.
You should try reading Sirius by Olaf Stapledon. He's one of the pioneers of SF, and Sirius is also about a dog bred (the old-fashioned way, not GMed) for intelligence. Plus, it's really good! It's one of my all-time favorite books.

KaliMama
06-27-2009, 12:29 AM
Sirius by Olaf Stapledon. He's one of the pioneers of SF, and Sirius is also about a dog bred (the old-fashioned way, not GMed) for intelligence. Plus, it's really good! It's one of my all-time favorite books.

That looks good, Emiloid! :requests it from the library:

I'm reading The Palace of Illusions (http://www.chitradivakaruni.com/books/palace_of_illusions) by Chitra Lekha Banerjee Divakaruni. It's a retelling of the Mahābhārata (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mah%C4%81bh%C4%81rata), from the perspective of Draupadi/Panchaali, the wife of the Panadavas. It is wonderful. :heart:


Relevant to today’s war-torn world, The Palace of Illusions takes us back to the time of the Indian epic The Mahabharat—a time that is half-history, half-myth, and wholly magical. Through her narrator Panchaali, the wife of the legendary five Pandavas brothers, Divakaruni gives us a rare feminist interpretation of an epic story.

The novel traces Panchaali’s life, beginning with her magical birth in fire as the daughter of a king before following her spirited balancing act as a woman with five husbands who have been cheated out of their father’s kingdom. Panchaali is swept into their quest to reclaim their birthright, remaining at the brothers’ sides through years of exile and a terrible civil war. Meanwhile, we never lose sight of her stratagems to take over control of her household from her mother-in-law, her complicated friendship with the enigmatic Krishna, or her secret attraction to the mysterious man who is her husband’s most dangerous enemy. Panchaali is a fiery female voice in a world of warriors, gods, and ever-manipulating hands of fate.

Emiloid
06-30-2009, 02:06 PM
I hope you like Sirius, KM. It's been a while since I read it, so it might have some un-AR themes that weren't on my radar at the time. I loved it, though, and I think it's written in an interesting way. Sort of old-fashioned, I guess?

So, I finished Models Don't Eat Chocolate Cookies (http://www.erindionne.com/Models_home.html) by Erin Dionne. The author is someone I knew in high school... she was friends with some of my friends, and was also sort of a friend of mine, if that makes sense! The book is really good, in my opinion. It's from the point of view of an eighth-grade girl who is heavy, but who has never thought much about it. Then her aunt signs her up for a plus-size modeling challenge and she decides to lose weight in order to get out of the contest. Well, that's putting it pretty simply. She's also dealing with a tough friendship and a bully at school. Anyway, I thought the characterization was excellent, and it was very insightful and original. Also, it was very funny! I'd definitely recommend it, especially for teens and maybe pre-teens.

carabdle
07-01-2009, 04:00 PM
I'm about to finish up the with the "Ender" series by Orson Scott Card. I'm mainly into sci-fi and fantasy, with this being in the previous category. I've really enjoyed them all, with these last ones being about Bean (instead of Ender and, no, not Mr. Bean:p ). There's a newer Ender book, but I haven't gotten that one yet.

I already read The Time Traveler's Wife and once I got past the jumping around and set-up, it's one of the best books I've read, maybe ever. I think even non-sci-fi geeks would find it enjoyable if given a chance. I've also read the "new" Oz books and found it quite interesting that the Wicked Witch was an animal rights activist (of course, it was more about the talking/sentient animals of Oz, but you can't have everything I guess). I think I enjoyed the last one (about the cowardly Lion) the most.

veganshawn
07-01-2009, 04:18 PM
I just finished Lexicon Devil: The Fast Times and Short Life of Darby Crash and the Germs and I am now reading Pygmy which is good, but the writing style gets a little annoying about halfway though, but I am still enjoying it.

Emiloid
07-01-2009, 05:55 PM
BTW, I kinda burned out on The Blind Watchmaker. The ideas were interesting, and so was the writing (though a bit long-winded at times), but I was just making such sloooowwwww progress that I had to move on to something else. You know, like children's literature! :laugh:

I'll be starting The Graveyard Book tonight. *rubs hands together*

KaliMama
07-01-2009, 08:43 PM
I hope you like Sirius, KM. It's been a while since I read it, so it might have some un-AR themes that weren't on my radar at the time. I loved it, though, and I think it's written in an interesting way. Sort of old-fashioned, I guess?

I have a major soft spot for old-school science fiction. :heart:


I'm about to finish up the with the "Ender" series by Orson Scott Card. I'm mainly into sci-fi and fantasy, with this being in the previous category. I've really enjoyed them all, with these last ones being about Bean (instead of Ender and, no, not Mr. Bean:p ). There's a newer Ender book, but I haven't gotten that one yet.

I loved the Ender books!


I'll be starting The Graveyard Book tonight. *rubs hands together*

Yay! If you like being read to, you can watch/hear Gaiman read it here (http://www.mousecircus.com/videotour.aspx). :thumbsup:

La Végétalienne
07-01-2009, 08:51 PM
I don't usually read much science fiction, but right now I'm reading The Postman by David Brin. It's about a post-1980's nuclear holocaust survivor turned traveler. I wouldn't bother posting about it except that I found it really amusing to discover that it is supposed to take place in May 2009.

There's a brief section where the author shows how far humanity has devolved by describing a dog fight put on in honor of the main character. His discomfort with it causes the other spectators to become less enthusiastic and one even exclaims, "Are we really doing this? Only seventeen years ago I was a member of the ASPCA! What's happened to us? What's happened to me?" And then they cancel the second fight scheduled for that night. :thumbsup:

Miso Vegan
07-01-2009, 09:51 PM
For a bit of light reading I'm in The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society. There are aspects that are interesting, as it's a(n) historical fiction that takes place at the end of WWII, but the entire book is written in letters/telegrams.

carabdle
07-02-2009, 03:47 PM
I loved the Ender books!
I do too. I still haven't read Ender in Exile (as I'm waiting for it to at least come out in paperback), but I think I've read--or am about to--every other one thus far.

Ariann
07-02-2009, 07:08 PM
The only Orson Scott Card book I've read is "Lost Boys," which freaked me out so much I couldn't fall asleep if the book was in my bedroom. I was thrilled to return it to the library!

I'm reading "The Antelope's Strategy" by Jean Hatzfeld now. It is the third book by Hatzfeld about the genocide in Rwanda and is mostly long quotes from both survivors and perpetrators. It is really disturbing of course, but beautifully written.

JasperKat
07-03-2009, 09:28 AM
I loved the Ender books!

Are they vampire books?

-JK

KaliMama
07-03-2009, 03:32 PM
No way! They are science fiction (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ender%27s_Game_series).

(no offense to vampire book lovers :kiss:)

Svartalfheim
07-03-2009, 04:32 PM
I've started the 4th in The Saxon Tales by Bernard Cornwell called Sword Song.

JasperKat
07-03-2009, 08:46 PM
No way! They are science fiction (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ender&#37;27s_Game_series).

(no offense to vampire book lovers :kiss:)

There's a guy that used to work with me (has since been fired) who insisted that we call him "Ender". He further insisted that he was a vampire. A real vampire. No word on how or why a real vampire would want or need a job unloading stock at a home improvement store. He did work the night shift though, so I guess that sort of fit. :rolleyes:

He must have also been a science fiction fan, because his first name was Andrew.

-JK

KaliMama
07-03-2009, 09:14 PM
Oh, my.

tin can
07-04-2009, 01:41 AM
He must have also been a science fiction fan, because his first name was Andrew.

:laugh:

La Végétalienne
07-04-2009, 07:20 PM
A couple of years ago (ie before the Twilight-induced vampire craze) I had a co-worker try for weeks to convince us that he was a vampire. Turned out he just had a weird sense of humor.

bekah-chan
07-04-2009, 09:13 PM
well on an un-vampire-related note, i just read an article in bust magazine about the gulabi gang (http://www.gulabigang.org/en/index.html), a group of women in india who are fighting injustice. it's a really awesome article about them that you should check out, or at least visit the site i posted the link for :)

Dugan
07-04-2009, 10:03 PM
Nick Harkaway's Gone Away World (http://www.amazon.com/The-Gone-Away-World-ebook/dp/B001EL6R9W/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1246762752&sr=8-2). I learned of this while reading a review for Slick Six mentioned upthread. Not like SS, this is a post-war new world forming with flashbacks to our pre-war world. What happens when dreams are made real?

JasperKat
07-08-2009, 06:44 AM
I just finished The Hidden Life of Dogs :yuck: The author didn't back up a single one of her assertions about her dog's emotions and motivations with research or even an explanation of how she arrived to her conclusions. On top of that, she's a downright irresponsible dog owner, allowing her dogs to roam the city, mate at will, and basically live without any structure at all. I was expecting a book about the emotional life of canines and got syrupy garbage. This amazon reviewer summed it up nicely:


This book is a beautiful & touching account of incompetence & irresponsibility.

I'm a few chapters into Blink, which I like so far. Anyone else read it? I think it was pretty popular a few years ago.

-JK

Dugan
07-08-2009, 06:51 AM
I just finished The Hidden Life of Dogs :yuck:
Yep, that's about what I thought of it.

gladcow
07-08-2009, 12:49 PM
I finished Take the Cannoli by Sarah Vowell. It was really really good and I've now dubbed her the voice of my generation :D

I'm almost done with Embroideries by Marjane Satrapi. It's amazing :sunny:

ganymeder
07-08-2009, 04:22 PM
Just started Red Planet (http://www.ereader.com/servlet/mw) by Heinlein on ereader. :)

Emiloid
07-08-2009, 09:00 PM
There's a guy that used to work with me (has since been fired) who insisted that we call him "Ender". He further insisted that he was a vampire.
I have a friend (sort of... we knew each other in high school) who also insists he's a vampire. He says he's an HLV--a Human Living Vampire. Ha! Whatever, dude! :rolleyes:

Sorry about the delayed response... I've been away from the computer for a few days! :p

nauthiz
07-09-2009, 09:06 AM
I'm reading Sitting with Koans, a book of essays on the history of koan study in Ch'an and Zen buddhism edited by John Daido Loori.

It has absolutely nothing to do with vampires. Does have some fascinating tidbits, though.

nauthiz
07-09-2009, 09:06 AM
I'm reading Sitting with Koans, a book of essays on the history of koan study in Ch'an and Zen buddhism edited by John Daido Loori.

It has absolutely nothing to do with vampires. Does have some fascinating tidbits, though.

KaliMama
07-09-2009, 11:13 AM
But a vampire could read it, right? So, you could be a vampire.

JasperKat
07-09-2009, 07:24 PM
I have a friend (sort of... we knew each other in high school) who also insists he's a vampire. He says he's an HLV--a Human Living Vampire. Ha! Whatever, dude! :rolleyes:

What does THAT mean? :thinking:

-JK