PDA

View Full Version : what are you reading?



Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 [8] 9 10 11 12

vegankitty
05-13-2008, 10:02 PM
I got the new Chuck Palahniuk , Snuff today. I was re-reading Wicked but that is going on hold until I read the new Palahniuk.

stegan
05-14-2008, 09:07 AM
Starbucked: A Double Tall Tale of Caffeine, Commerce, and Culture (http://www.powells.com/biblio/1-9780316013482-3) by Taylor Clark.
Just finished this, and found it absolutely fascinating. Not to oversimplify, but everything comes down to two points:

1.Starbucks isn't as evil as we think it might be. No doubt it's still evil, with its union busting and unscrupulous real estate dealings, but as a business, it ends up benefitting communities instead of harming them. Why? Because every time one moves into a town, the mom and pop coffee shops (the smart ones at least) get the opportunity to raise their game- they get the chance to prove they sell a superior product with better service, and on top of it, have an excuse to raise their prices to a Starbucks level (thus pumping more money into the local economy). He uses Ashland, OR as an example. It's a town of 21,000 that now has 4 Starbucks- yet all of the coffeeshops that were there B.S. (Before Starbucks) are still there, and having record sales.

2.Starbucks' ubiquity leads to its own mediocrity. With their goal of 40,000 stores (!), they've had to streamline and homogenize their product to such a point that their employees are no more than button pushers, and the product loses out to McDonalds in taste tests. So in the end, when the luster of the fanciness of the "experience" is gone, and Starbucks isn't cool with the SUV crowd anymore, they don't even have the quality that marked their early days to fall back on. Which in the end makes them just another fast food chain.

stegan
05-14-2008, 09:10 AM
I am reading Thanking the Monkey: Rethinking the Way We Treat Animals by Karen Dawn. She will be a guest on my radio show in early June.
http://www.harpercollins.com/books/9780061351853/Thanking_the_Monkey/index.aspx
That looks really interesting! It's still on order at our library. :(

Shion
05-18-2008, 05:22 PM
I finished reading "Making Money" By Terry Prachette last night and "The Spiritual Lives of Animals." I am trying to finish "The God Delusion," but I must say I am not impressed by it. I wished there was more depth and detail in the science, and less ranting.

nauthiz
05-30-2008, 07:04 PM
I just started on The Animal Rights Debate by Carl Cohen and Tom Regan. Interesting read so far.

gladcow
05-30-2008, 07:08 PM
I'm finishing up Cat's Cradle.

VegeTexan
05-30-2008, 07:39 PM
I need to go back and re-read some early Vonnegut. It was his play "Happy Birthday, Wanda June" that got me started as a vegetarian thirty years ago.

gladcow
05-30-2008, 07:45 PM
I am extremely under read in the "classics" and thus, this is my first Vonnegut. :blush:

melt86
05-30-2008, 08:19 PM
Just started reading Yakuza Moon - memoirs of a gansters daughter.
loving books right now with really strong female characters. REcently read the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo which was not directly about the character Salander but she was amazing nonetheless.

gr8flgrl
05-30-2008, 10:36 PM
I'm gathering steam to read Philip Zimardo'sThe Lucifer Effect (http://www.lucifereffect.org/) Mr. Gr8 came home with it a few weeks ago, after a visit with his father who said it was amazing, but sometimes emotionally difficult to read. I'm super keen to read it, but I don't want to get my insides ripped up at the moment. Its been a difficult year and just recently things are calm and I'm enjoying life.

I'm keeping Interpreting Children's Drawings close at hand. Little gr8 has started drawing (finally!) and its fascinating to understand what going on in his noggin through his pictures.

michiganveganchick
05-31-2008, 01:36 PM
david sedaris has a new book coming out (in june, i think)!

i just finished the boleyn inheritance. started out a little slow but about halfway through i got hooked. my grandma did our family history and we're related to the boleyns, so it's pretty interesting reading about them (even though it's historical fiction). i loved the other boleyn girl. this one wasn't quite as good, but i still really enjoyed it.

also looking forward to reading the new james frey book. i loved a million little pieces and i have high hopes for this one. (i have my borders coupon printed since it's so expensive in hardcover!)

JasperKat
06-05-2008, 10:45 AM
david sedaris has a new book coming out (in june, i think)!

:!: love him beyond words.

I'm rereading Al Franken's Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them :laugh: He cracks me up.

-JK

Shion
06-06-2008, 04:31 AM
I've been meaning to read "The Other Boleyn Girl."

Right now I am finishing "The God Delusion." Then I got "FatSo?," "The Ascension Factor" By Frank Herbert & some other dude who's name eludes me at the moment, and "The Pagan Nun."

I'm almost done with "Ship of Magic" by Robin Hobb ( I really love her novels), and "How to read Neitzsche."

gr8flgrl
06-06-2008, 12:47 PM
In the last few years I've noticed that my book reading is way down and my magazine reading is way up. I've been content to contribute it to my status as a mom with a special needs child, but after reading Nicholas Carr, "Is Google Making Us Stupid" in the Atlantic this month, I'm reconsidering that notion. Carr discusses how the internet, and other technological advances in media distribution (e.g. written language, the printing press) have changed and "shaped the process of thought." If you don't get a chance to check it out in hard copy, it should on the website in a few weeks. Fascinating.

Dugan
06-22-2008, 09:46 PM
Okay, so it's about 10 years out of date but I've finished Spoiled (http://www.amazon.com/Spoiled-Dangerous-Truth-about-Haywire/dp/014027555X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1214185330&sr=8-1) by Nicols Fox. Very good. The chapters specifically on meat make me wonder why anyone eats it anymore. My omni SO has promised to read the chapter about cross contamination and cleanliness - he better hope I never get sick from contaminants HIS meats bring into the house. I'm hoping he'll also read the chapter about chicken. Aside from the whole ethical aspect, it's just disgusting. Given the choice of uncontaminated tofu or almost certainly contaminated chicken, it is inconceivable to me why anyone would opt for the chicken.

gladcow
06-23-2008, 01:06 AM
I just finished Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer. It was incredibly sad and incredibly powerful. I wanted to read it again immediately. But, I'm going to read other stuff and come back to it in a bit. I just started Everything is Illuminated by Jonathan Safran Foer and have Another Bullshit Night in Suck City by Nick Flynn on deck.

Dugan
06-23-2008, 08:24 AM
Into Thin Air was good. For a totally different take on the same situation, check out The Climb (http://www.amazon.com/Climb-Tragic-Ambitions-Everest/dp/0312965338/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1214223768&sr=8-1). It's from the Russian climber Anatoli Boukreev.

veganshawn
06-23-2008, 08:44 AM
Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension of American Racism by James W. Loewen.

It is a very interesting book, powerful subject matter that will open up your eyes to a hidden part of America's racist ways (I wish I could say past). I grew up near one of these towns in Ohio, that according to my step dad (who was African/Native American) still had a sign as of the late 70's that said "N***ers out before dark".
I think the most interesting part of this book so far is the fact that almost all of the towns the author has found have been in the "North" and West coast, as opposed to the "South" which was suppossed to be the "bad guy" in American race relations.
Here is the synopsis (is this the right word, sorry it is 5 am and I am half asleep) from the author:

From Maine to California, thousands of communities kept out African Americans (or sometimes Chinese Americans, Jewish Americans, etc.) by force, law, or custom. These communities are sometimes called "sundown towns" because some of them posted signs at their city limits reading, typically, "Nigger, Don't Let The Sun Go Down On You In ___." Some towns are still all white on purpose. Their chilling stories have been joined more recently by the many elite (and some not so elite) suburbs like Grosse Pointe, MI, or Edina, MN, that have excluded nonwhites by "kinder gentler means." When I began this research, I expected to find about 10 sundown towns in Illinois (my home state) and perhaps 50 across the country. Instead, I have found more than 440 in Illinois and thousands across the United States. This is their story; it is the first book ever written on the topic.
I highly recommend reading this book.

gladcow
06-23-2008, 11:00 AM
Into Thin Air was good. For a totally different take on the same situation, check out The Climb (http://www.amazon.com/Climb-Tragic-Ambitions-Everest/dp/0312965338/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1214223768&sr=8-1). It's from the Russian climber Anatoli Boukreev.

The edition I have has an update at the end that mentions that book. I've been considering it, thanks :)

michiganveganchick
06-23-2008, 05:45 PM
i just started When You Are Engulfed In Flames (David Sedaris). So far, I can hardly put it down.


:!: love him beyond words.
-JK

you're welcome to borrow it when i'm done. (and did you see he's coming to AA? tix just went on sale. i'm thinking about going, but haven't committed yet.)

JasperKat
06-27-2008, 01:54 PM
you're welcome to borrow it when i'm done. (and did you see he's coming to AA? tix just went on sale. i'm thinking about going, but haven't committed yet.)

Thanks! I bet we'll end up buying it, even though I'm trying to curb the book buying.

We saw him AA a few summers ago and he was HI-LAR-IOUS. Got to meet him and have our books signed afterwards and I couldn't think of a single thing to say that didn't sound stupid. :laugh: You should definitely go, the only thing better than his writing is hearing him read his work. His delivery is hysterical. Did you ever hear the story the chef with the fake hand? I heard it on NPR years ago and came thisclose to peeing my pants, no exaggeration.

-JK
ETA: google "who's the chef" and sedaris and the first result is that story. But try to find the audio, it's so much funnier in his own voice.

gladcow
06-27-2008, 02:02 PM
I'm really enjoying Everything is Illuminated.

KaliMama
06-27-2008, 03:11 PM
:heart:

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close is also wonderful. <-- one of my favorite books ever, really.

gladcow
06-27-2008, 03:15 PM
my friend was just telling me that! :happy: it's on my list :heart:

anya the vegan
06-27-2008, 04:22 PM
The Culture Clash: A Revolutionary New Way to Understanding the Relationship Between Humans and Domestic Dogs - by Jean Donaldson. Really interesting, but I think I am going to have to read it a few more times to fully understand her training methods.

The Earth Shall Weep-A History of Native America-very good so far...full of things we never learn in history class. :umm:

Love is a Mix Tape - by rolling stone writer rob sheffield. this is my 3rd time reading it. a quick read and an absolutely adorable memoir.

michiganveganchick
06-27-2008, 05:23 PM
We saw him AA a few summers ago and he was HI-LAR-IOUS. Got to meet him and have our books signed afterwards and I couldn't think of a single thing to say that didn't sound stupid. :laugh: You should definitely go, the only thing better than his writing is hearing him read his work. His delivery is hysterical. Did you ever hear the story the chef with the fake hand? I heard it on NPR years ago and came thisclose to peeing my pants, no exaggeration.

-JK
ETA: google "who's the chef" and sedaris and the first result is that story. But try to find the audio, it's so much funnier in his own voice.

i love both of those stories. i was at that show in AA, and also in line after to meet him! i probably walked right by you. :happy: i saw him in detroit last year, too, so i'm trying to justify to myself i need to spend $$ to see him a third time. :p

seitanicvegan
06-27-2008, 07:10 PM
I was at B&N last week, browsing around and generally getting up to no good (not for my wallet, anyway). A slender volume of poetry tempted me demurely with a peaceful photograph on the cover. I am not one for poetry perse, but I absentmindedly thought I'd give it a go. I could at least delay the agony of getting into my non-air-conditioned car for a little longer. I had no idea what was in store for me. You see, that nondescript book was an edition of recent poems by Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, Mary Oliver. And I was blown away. Her poems made me laugh out loud. They made me smile with the knowing contentment from my own very personal communions with nature. And they brought me to tears right there in the middle of the store. But I didn't care. These poems slammed me back with a deep resonance that echoed in my own life. I walked out with all of her books in hard cover.

quagga
06-27-2008, 07:33 PM
In the last few years I've noticed that my book reading is way down and my magazine reading is way up. I've been content to contribute it to my status as a mom with a special needs child, but after reading Nicholas Carr, "Is Google Making Us Stupid" in the Atlantic this month, I'm reconsidering that notion. Carr discusses how the internet, and other technological advances in media distribution (e.g. written language, the printing press) have changed and "shaped the process of thought." If you don't get a chance to check it out in hard copy, it should on the website in a few weeks. Fascinating.

I read that article, too! For years now my reading has been steadily trending away from books to in-depth magazine and newspaper articles (which are often precursors to books). I think the biggest change in the process of thought was the change from an oral culture to a written culture.

Somewhere around here there a thread on magazines that VRFers read...

bluedawg
06-27-2008, 07:56 PM
Got to meet him and have our books signed afterwards and I couldn't think of a single thing to say that didn't sound stupid. :laugh:

that is soooooooooooooooooooooooo me. i embarrass myself every time.

JasperKat
06-28-2008, 10:33 AM
that is soooooooooooooooooooooooo me. i embarrass myself every time.

I did the same thing when I met Erik Marcus. I stood in line and heard the 5 people in front of me say "I love your podcast!" then I got my turn and blurted out "I love your podcast!" :rolleyes: :laugh:

-JK

gladcow
06-28-2008, 03:31 PM
"This was the lesson we learned from everything that happened - there is no God. It took all of the hidden faces for Him to prove this to us."

"What if it was a challenge of your faith?" I said.

"I could not believe in a God who would challenge faith like this"

"What if it is not in His power?"

"I could not believe in a God that could not stop what happened."

"What if it was a man and not God that did all of this?"

"I do not believe in man, either."

Just finished Everthing is Illuminated.

:cry:

KaliMama
06-28-2008, 03:40 PM
{{{gladcow}}}

bumblebee
06-28-2008, 06:26 PM
Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance
Barack Obama

melt86
06-29-2008, 05:59 AM
I read that article, too! For years now my reading has been steadily trending away from books to in-depth magazine and newspaper articles (which are often precursors to books). I think the biggest change in the process of thought was the change from an oral culture to a written culture.

Somewhere around here there a thread on magazines that VRFers read...

Currently reading "Where have all the intellectuals gone?" by Frank Furedi. he provides lots of reasons why the internet and, what has turned into, 'equal access' has changed the way people view and share information. he has made me rethink lots of the ways I view my teaching as well, and how education has changed along with the changes in attitude towards information, 'truth' and philosophical thinking.

.... he may also be subconsciously making me use big words ...

JasperKat
06-29-2008, 08:45 AM
Just finished "The Other End of the Leash" (thanks, AmandaMI!) and started "Felinestein" on the recommendation of petaske 'kwe'. Elmer and Mr Fish are not the brightest bulbs in the bunch, but Jasper is rather smart and I think he gets bored. I'm hoping to find some ideas for activities he can do to alleviate that.

-JK

LesMiserablesLove
06-29-2008, 10:55 AM
I just finished two books: Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture, and One Day, All Children...

I really loved Female Chauvinist Pigs. It spoke to concerns I already had about women embracing porn, sex magazines, strip clubs, and other societal ways of constructing women as sex objects.

One Day, All Children was about the start of Teach for America. It was weighed down by a lot of organizational details such as fundraising and expansion. I wouldn't recommend it unless you're thinking of starting a non-profit.

And currently I'm reading Savage Inequalities: Children in America's Schools. The first chapter isn't so much about schools but showing how poverty and segregation persist in the most grotesque ways in urban areas. I would recommend reading the first chapter just to be reminded or shocked of how bad things are in the US.

Next on my list after this book is Pornified: How Pornography Is Transforming Our Lives, Our Relationships, and Our Families.

Dugan
07-06-2008, 07:38 PM
Dakota, by Martha Grimes.

Picked it up out of the "new" rack at the library on a whim. Not at all what I expected. Partly a mystery, which I expected, but heavily into animal rights, sort of. It goes into factory farming (pigs, specifically), with the main character wanting to make one of them treat their animals more humanely... meanwhile... she's still eating dairy products and eggs, which seems hypocritical for someone who is willing to steal animals to save them. That's the sort of part for me. On the other hand, the main stream seeming cover and inside cover info doesn't make it seem at all about animal rights, so maybe some people will read this and be influenced by it. Sneaky...

When I returned it, the librarian commented about it. Had I liked it? Yes, I replied. She asked what I thought of the factory farm and slaughter house descriptions, weren't they horrible? I replied, they seemed accurate, and if anything, quite mild, and that I hoped people would learn about these things by reading the book.

I don't know anything about this author or whether her other books share this message. The name is definitely on my "look for" list for my next library trip.

gladcow
07-06-2008, 09:29 PM
I finished Another Bullshit Night in Suck City. I liked it quite a bit. Now I'm reading Candy Girl by Diablo Cody (I picked it up used, and it's a signed first edition, heh). Up on deck are Bluebeard by Vonnegut and Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer.

stegan
07-09-2008, 11:40 AM
One nice thing about being flat on my back for much of yesterday was being able to plow through about half of Thanking The Monkey. I like it overall- although the writing is a little too current at points- I can't help but feel like half of the information in book will be outdated by next year. But as an vegan starter educational piece, I love it. It's definitely a book I'm going to start foisting on people who aren't already vegan. :D

gladcow
07-09-2008, 01:40 PM
I finished Candy Girl. It was goodish. A nice read that I didn't have to think about much. Now I'm on to Bluebeard, it's good so far.

VegeTexan
07-09-2008, 02:37 PM
I have picked up a book I read a few years ago by George Carlin, "Napalm and Silly Putty", cause I miss not having George in our world.

Hippopotamine
07-11-2008, 11:40 AM
I just finished reading The Prosecution of George W. Bush for Murder by Vincent Bugliosi. I found it to be one of the most important books I've ever read and one that, imo, all Americans should read. :thumbsup:

Now I'm reading Kiln People by David Brin. So far it's a pretty interesting sci-fi story. I like David Brin, so I'm expecting it to be good.

VegeTexan
07-11-2008, 12:45 PM
I just finished reading The Prosecution of George W. Bush for Murder by Vincent Bugliosi. I found it to be one of the most important books I've ever read and one that, imo, all Americans should read. :thumbsup:



Thanks, Hippopotamine, for letting me know about this book.
I googled and found the website
http://www.prosecutionofbush.com/index.php

There are excerpts and a video of the author explaining his position.
Everyone should go see.
BTW, Bugliosi is the attorney who successfully prosecuted Charles Manson.

Roxy
07-11-2008, 01:03 PM
I'm currently reading "Catcher In The Rye". I didn't expect to enjoy it as much as I am.

I'm also reading a couple of travel books about San Francisco, as my partner and I are heading down there for a 2 week vacation this September. :)

Hippopotamine
07-11-2008, 01:37 PM
I googled and found the website
http://www.prosecutionofbush.com/index.php

There are excerpts and a video of the author explaining his position.
Everyone should go see.
BTW, Bugliosi is the attorney who successfully prosecuted Charles Manson.

Cool! Thanks for providing the link, VegeTexan. :)

Shion
08-07-2008, 08:06 PM
Started reading "Ancient Egyptian Magic: Spells, Incantations, Potions, Stories and Rituals" By: Bob Brier (my favorite Egyptologist in the whole world)

I'm reading LOTR to my husband at the moment along with the Noble Dead series.

Calliope
08-07-2008, 08:15 PM
I'm (re)reading The Book of Laughter and Forgetting by Milan Kundera. I could read all that man's books over and over. :)

vegankitty
08-07-2008, 08:22 PM
I'm (re)reading The Book of Laughter and Forgetting by Milan Kundera. I could read all that man's books over and over. :)

I just bought that on the street for a dollar!

I'm reading Lucky by Alice Sebold-the beginning made me cry.

sitting_vegan
08-07-2008, 08:38 PM
Francione's Intro to Animal Rights.

Such has been the direction of my reading lately.

Also started Torres Making A Killing, and have Regan's Case for Animal Rights waiting.

Calliope
08-07-2008, 09:09 PM
I just bought that on the street for a dollar!


Nice!! I love good finds like that! I hope you like it, vegankitty. :D

VegeTexan
08-07-2008, 09:28 PM
Good choices, sitting vegan. I need to read more of the great thinkers of AR philosophy, I find myself oscillating between the philosophy of Dandelion and that of Veganshawn, and both are heavy thinkers, I feel I should be reading "the classics."

I love to read for fun and Dean Koontz is my favorite author. During July I read his books The Good Guy and Odd Hours. But since I finished those I have been reading online articles and news to prepare for AR2008.

When it is over, I need more Koontz. (I could even start to read early books I have forgotten by the master)

veganshawn
08-07-2008, 11:24 PM
I have been reading to many "heavy" books so I picked up- Stalefish:Skateboard Culture from the Rejects Who Made It by Sean Sean Mortimer.

As many of you know I am a long time skateboarder, this book has interviews with a bunch of people involved in skateboarding from the 50's until today, it is a really interesting read, hearing the guys from the late 70's first finding punk (can you believe in the early 80's a crew cut was a counter culture statement!). By far the saddest is reading how much of a freak Rodney Mullen was, winning every contest except one for 10 years! Anyway if you want to read some interesting stories from a variety of skater then pick it up.

rick green
08-08-2008, 12:23 AM
The Plague by Albert Camus. It's good but a little stuffy after Vineland & The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon. TP is great.

Miso Vegan
08-08-2008, 01:09 AM
I was looking for fast and enjoyable, and read through Augusten Burroughs' Possible Side Effects, with David Sedaris' When You Are Engulfed in Flames in my hands before the Side Effects had cooled.

While I enjoyed AB's Magical Thinking, laughing so hard it hurt, and while I've loved many DS essays over the years, neither of their new books is living up to the standards they set in the past.

Which makes me want to stop reading Engulfed (I wouldn't really, of course) and pick up Yiddish Policemen's Union by Michael Chabon. Oh, how I loved Kavalier and Clay, and I hope YPU comes close. But, also, today I saw a photo of Mr. Chabon, and can I just say? Rowr.

gladcow
08-08-2008, 11:29 AM
waitaminute, you just now found out what Mr. Chabon looks like? Child, I've been appreciating his *ahem* superior genetics for years :p Really, though, I wanna be his wife's* best friend. I LOVE her. :yes: I haven't read YPU, but my friend (who has read all his books) says it was okay (which means it was probably pretty good. she's pretty picky :p)

I'm working my way through Seducing the Demon by Erika Jong. I'm liking it, but would like to have more time so I can actually read it. I finished I'm Proud of You, a memoir about Mr. Rogers. It was good :cry:

*Ayelet Waldman

Miso Vegan
08-08-2008, 11:52 AM
waitaminute, you just now found out what Mr. Chabon looks like? Child, I've been appreciating his *ahem* superior genetics for years

Yeah, well, y'know, I live an insular life. I, um, don't even know who his wife is. :embarr:

Falling Buffalo
08-08-2008, 12:52 PM
I recently finished reading White Noise by Don DeLillo, and i'm horribly conflicted. This is the third of DeLillo's books i've read, and i think i've come to the conclusion that i don't really like his writing. He has moments, but overall i've been finding his writing excessive; it's all too internal, too much insight, not enough material.

I'll be moving on to Robinson Crusoe (Daniel Defoe) and/or A Conspiracy of Paper (David Liss) next.

stegan
08-08-2008, 12:56 PM
I recently finished reading White Noise by Don DeLillo, and i'm horribly conflicted. This is the third of DeLillo's books i've read, and i think i've come to the conclusion that i don't really like his writing. He has moments, but overall i've been finding his writing excessive; it's all too internal, too much insight, not enough material.
I had a similar reaction to the first of his books that I read. I was so sick of his style by the middle that I did something I never do- skipped to the last chapter, read that, and took it back to the library. Just completely unenjoyable.

gladcow
08-08-2008, 01:56 PM
Yeah, well, y'know, I live an insular life. I, um, don't even know who his wife is. :embarr:

well, I did work in a bookstore for a long ass time, so I know a bit too much about some authors *ahem*

Ayelet Waldman (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ayelet_Waldman) is a writer and is most famous for saying that she loves her husband more than she loves her kids (http://www.nytimes.com/2005/03/27/fashion/27love.html?_r=1&oref=slogin). I really liked her book, Love & Other Impossible Pursuits (http://www.powells.com/biblio/17-9781400095131-0)

Miso Vegan
08-08-2008, 03:31 PM
wish-listed!

nauthiz
08-08-2008, 05:07 PM
Quirkology (http://www.quirkology.com/). So far, it's fascinating.

Vegtink
08-08-2008, 05:13 PM
I am sucked in to the twight seris. I am at the breaking dawn

Vegtink
08-08-2008, 05:13 PM
I am a dork

Vegtink
08-08-2008, 05:14 PM
It is a good series

Vegtink
08-08-2008, 05:15 PM
I am reading the shack 2. it sucks

Vegtink
08-08-2008, 05:16 PM
I got a kindle it rocks

Dugan
08-08-2008, 06:12 PM
I know two people who have them - one hates one loves. Both tell me how cost-effective it is, and how it'll pay itself off. Maybe if you buy books, but for me, the library is free.

How limited is the selection of books available?

gladcow
08-08-2008, 06:13 PM
I was thinking of putting my cookbook on Kindle. any thoughts?

Nanashi
08-08-2008, 06:39 PM
I assume you've read what others have said about it on amazon.com.

http://www.amazon.com/Have-you-published-book-Kindle/forum/FxBVKST06PWP9B/Tx3IZAKD22TKOQ0/1/ref=cm_cd_dp_tft_tp?%5Fencoding=UTF8&asin=B000FI73MA&store=fiona-hardware

if not, I recommend it. it sounds like if you publish on amazon it will be harder to publish a physical copy of it if you want to in the future.

At this point we can only guess how many Kindles have been sold. Amazon doesn't publish that number so you don't know how many people could even possibly purchase your book. I'd say it's safe to say there are fewer than a million kindles sold so far. You can probably do some math to guess how many of those might buy your book.

I guess I'd say don't self publish on amazon for the Kindle, unless you absolutely can't find a publisher otherwise. Once you have a publisher it should be fairly easy to get it kindle available too, you might have to work that out with the publisher though. I don't know if there would be legal restrictions from doing that or not.

gladcow
08-08-2008, 06:45 PM
oh, I was referring to the current book, not the coming book.

I've read a bit on their site about it when it came to my attention that it was an option. I'm going to do some more reading before I make my final decision. Thank you for your thoughts, Nanashi, they are helping me frame my decision. :)

Nanashi
08-08-2008, 07:19 PM
Oh yeah, Gladcow Cookbook the first.

Do it!

but... will people want a $350 electronic device in the kitchen while they're cooking? I know our cookbooks can find themselves in some rough conditions as their warped pages will testify to.

VegeTexan
08-08-2008, 09:27 PM
I would never do kindle, I like the feel of a real book in my hands.
I might be of the old school, but for me, computers are for writing articles, doing research, connecting with friends. (Home use)

At work computers are for spending a little time with VRF friends (only while I am working on some real work related project, of course,) doing research, manipulating work related video projects.

I like reading news and articles online, but I wouldn't read books there.

I like to curl up in bed with a real book, read a book on a flight, put my feet up on my desk at work and read a novel (on authorized breaks, of course.)

La Végétalienne
08-09-2008, 01:37 AM
I like the feel of a real book in my hands.
Super huge +1 there. Maybe more like a +1 million. I also like the way books smell. Right now I'm reading VRF. :p
I'm also sloooowly working my way through Jane Austen's novels (on Emma right now) and concurrently, The Jane Austen Book Club.

steroidicalkiwi
08-09-2008, 08:29 AM
on the road by jack kerouac. very good, although it may be slowly convincing me to become a drifter :laugh:

Vegtink
08-10-2008, 10:34 PM
I love my Kindle. I am able to buy books at half price. I do not think publishers have an issue or they would not put their books online to be down loaded. How do pulishers project sales? Thay can factor in ebook sales if thy are putting them online to have us down load. I am reading the Twight series which I all bout on the Kindle. They list top sellers and it is going to the top sellers. Does a book smell better? yes trees smell great. should a book smell great made of trees? How many books should someone sell for them trees to smell so great? The kindle is not the only ebook out there. yes about a million has been sold. Did you factor in the dell version or sony's? The kindle is not the only one out there. I just bought the dell version to compair to the kindle. I do not think it has the variety that that Amazon offers. Though a book may smell great, I do not wanna smell trees. The Kindle has it advantags. It helps me buy books at a cheaper price. I can hold a 160 books on the Kindle. It uses no paper so does not tear down rain forests or what ecer trees are used when printing millions of books. The Kindle is easy on my eyes. I can read it without my glasses. It is anplus if yhou ask me.

Vegtink
08-10-2008, 10:36 PM
Expansive yes but when you spend a $100 a months on boks and can slice that in half that is sweet.

Shion
08-11-2008, 02:25 AM
I have mixed feelings for kindles. On one hand it would de-clutter my apartment readily, but on the other hand, I like physical books. I think if I were to get one it would be for textbooks, but I think it will be awhile before schools pick up on it.

La Végétalienne
08-11-2008, 02:44 AM
I think if I were to get one it would be for textbooks, but I think it will be awhile before schools pick up on it.
That is such a good idea! Textbooks are the only books I ever buy, and I hate keeping them around, but also can't stand the idea of selling them back for pennies. (Since I don't do much science-y stuff, I've actually been able to get quite a few of my books for class from the library. Score!) And even though I also like the physical book-ness, I wouldn't mind not having to carry heavy textbooks. Now we just need to convince the textbook publishing companies...
:thinking:

Miso Vegan
08-11-2008, 11:21 AM
I love the smell and physicalness of books. I used to spend hours in used book stores. While I'm reading, I have a particular way of holding the book, with my right-hand index finger behind the next page, even if I'm nowhere near ready to turn it. I have a hard time reading books without putting my index finger behind the next page!



But I could still love a Kindle. Easily. 2nd generation, where are you?

LesMiserablesLove
08-11-2008, 04:07 PM
I just finished Stripped: Inside the Lives of Exotic Dancers by Bernadette Barton. It was really informative. She showed the positives and negatives that come with exotic dancing, but I felt she overestimated the amount of polarization in debates about the effect of stripping on women. It was a really quick read though. I love books with lots of personal interviews.

Shion
08-11-2008, 05:49 PM
That is such a good idea! Textbooks are the only books I ever buy, and I hate keeping them around, but also can't stand the idea of selling them back for pennies. (Since I don't do much science-y stuff, I've actually been able to get quite a few of my books for class from the library. Score!) And even though I also like the physical book-ness, I wouldn't mind not having to carry heavy textbooks. Now we just need to convince the textbook publishing companies...
:thinking:
I think it will only be a matter of time, since digital publishing is so much cheaper then traditional publishing. It also allows authors, editors, and the publishing community to update information quicker then before. Once this technology cheapens, I think some form of this technology will eventually replace textbooks even in all the schools.

However, I do not think it will stop the publication of physical books, just like the common use of MP3 players has not haulted the production of CDs.

Shion
08-11-2008, 05:51 PM
I just finished Stripped: Inside the Lives of Exotic Dancers by Bernadette Barton. It was really informative. She showed the positives and negatives that come with exotic dancing, but I felt she overestimated the amount of polarization in debates about the effect of stripping on women. It was a really quick read though. I love books with lots of personal interviews.
I will have to see if I can get this book at the library. It sounds really interesting.

Currently I am reading: Sister of the Dead (again), The Fellowship of the Ring (again), Living Wicca By Scott Cunningham, Hunters of Dune (I got this marked down to $6 :) ), and The Crafty Witch.

lamb
08-11-2008, 06:03 PM
I revisited the old R.L. Stine Goosebumps series this weekend. I loved those books when I was younger, and my boyfriend has a shelf full of them at his parents house, so while waiting for him to wake up I read "Revenge of the Lawn Gnomes." Pretty suspenseful...:rolleyes:

Jessica?
08-11-2008, 06:03 PM
i'm reading the Tao of Pooh :]
veryy good book

veganshawn
08-11-2008, 07:15 PM
Grabbed a copy of Do Androids dream of electric sheep by Phillip K Dick so I will be reading that shortly.

Calliope
08-11-2008, 08:16 PM
Just started One Hundred Years of Solitude today. So far, so good. :D

bluedawg
08-13-2008, 10:22 PM
Vegtink, i'm reading the twilight saga as well! :blush:

i'm only halfway through new moon (book 2), though.

gladcow
08-13-2008, 11:12 PM
gave up on the Jong book. moved on to The Know It All (http://books.google.com/books?id=VQ3kPyFWfxYC&dq=AJ+Jacobs&pg=PP1&ots=oLHVPXoNxY&sig=f0x3qjzj1BW9SkWTocwDtR_3__g&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=4&ct=result#PPP1,M1)

KaliMama
08-19-2008, 10:34 AM
Crooked Little Vein by Warren Ellis. I laughed out loud a lot while reading this strange little book. If you've read Ellis' comic book series Transmetropolitan, you already know why. Then again, if you've read Transmetropolitan, you've probably already read Crooked Little Vein.

From the wikipedia entry:

Michael McGill, a burned-out private eye is hired by a corrupt White House Chief of Staff to find a second "secret" US Constitution, which had been lost in a whorehouse by Richard Nixon. What follows is a scavenger hunt across America, exposing its seedier side along the way. McGill is joined by surreal college student side-kick, Trix, who is writing a thesis on sexual fetishes

You can read a chapter here (http://warren-ellis.livejournal.com/104930.html).


And here's a review (http://www.fantasybookspot.com/jaytomio/2008/02/24/review-crooked-little-vein-by-warren-ellis/#more-390).

:thumbsup:

KaliMama
08-19-2008, 10:44 AM
Daughters of the North (http://feministreview.blogspot.com/2008/08/daughters-of-north.html).

Beautiful, difficult to read at times, impossible to put down. Made me think of emzy now and then.

bluedawg
08-19-2008, 10:47 AM
Vegtink, i'm reading the twilight saga as well! :blush:

i'm only halfway through new moon (book 2), though.

i finished new moon over the weekend, and now i'm halfway through eclipse. lookit me go!

Calliope
08-19-2008, 06:19 PM
Made me think of emzy now and then.

Speaking of emzy, where did she go?

I'm (re)reading In the Skin of a Lion. I :heart: Michael Ondaatje.

nauthiz
08-19-2008, 07:28 PM
I think she said she'd be internet-less until mid-September.

JasperKat
08-22-2008, 07:04 AM
I got a kindle it rocks

I have the Sony Reader, basically the same thing. I lurve it. Not only are new books cheaper, but I don't have to leave home to buy them, wait for them to arrive, or pay shipping. Plus you can find a ton of classics for download that are free or nearly so. I'm reading The Jungle Book right now :)

Also love it for vacation. Take a ton of books with you without the weight!

The only issue I have with it is that I have to be much more careful with it than a regular book. No reading in the tub!

-JK

JasperKat
08-29-2008, 11:42 AM
Vegtink, i'm reading the twilight saga as well! :blush:

i'm only halfway through new moon (book 2), though.

I just finished the first book. There were some parts that made me do this face: :worried: , particularly that Edward watches her sleep? Without her knowledge? Creepy. and that he always seems to be "chuckling" at her, kind of dismissive, isn't it? but I think that's because I was thinking of my little sister reading the book. It's a love story and those things don't happen in a healthy relationship. I hate when romance novels pass off stalkery or controlling behavior as romantic.

Anyways! I liked it a lot more than I probably should like a book written for 15 year old girls, and I'll go see the movie!

-JK

bluedawg
08-29-2008, 02:32 PM
heh, JK, i hear you. i tend to read it from my own adult perspective, but i recently learned that my cousin's stepdaughter is into these books, and now every so often i'm like, 'whoa, i wonder what amanda thought when she read that part.'

i'm into book 4 now, but only about 250 pages or so (it's 750 pages long). i haven't had a good chunk of free time to just sit and read... maybe soon!

Miso Vegan
08-29-2008, 02:49 PM
I'm enjoying Ann Patchett's bel canto. And doubling it up by listening to the band bel canto. :)

nauthiz
08-29-2008, 04:17 PM
Which album?

Miso Vegan
08-29-2008, 07:10 PM
I have Shimmering and Birds of Passage.

vegankitty
08-30-2008, 05:06 PM
I read Female Chauvinist Pigs ,Love is a Mixtape-which was very good and The Golden Notebook by Doris Lessing. Next up is Thanking the Monkey , which I got signed at AR 2008.

I read the first Twilight book and am waiting for paperback versions of the other ones.

Miso Vegan
08-30-2008, 06:01 PM
I'm enjoying Ann Patchett's bel canto.

The pacing of this book was interesting. It initially sucked me in (first chapter was very nicely done), then it lolled about with lovely descriptions and storytelling, until right at the very end, which had a stunning (but not surprising) finish.

Kangaroo
08-31-2008, 04:28 PM
Twilight in Italy by DH Lawrence, and Becoming Vegetarian by Vesanto Melina/Brenda Davis

Kap
09-01-2008, 03:56 AM
Just got my copy of The China Study. Holy crap. I can't believe how ignorant I was about nutrition. This book is awesome. Usually I cant put a book down because I read great Russian literature and its the best reading there is but I cant put this China Study down. I feel so badly for allowing my sons to eat the way they have. Its almost child abuse. I'm going to buy copies for friends and family...wow

sitting_vegan
09-01-2008, 02:17 PM
Just finished 'Making A Killing' by Bob Torres. Great overview on the anarchist movement.

Now going to start 'Sexual Politics of Meat' by Carol J Adams.

ginny
09-07-2008, 11:17 PM
Sexual Politics of Meat sounds interesting!



I am currently reading 100 Years of Solitude.

veganshawn
09-07-2008, 11:48 PM
Just finished 'Making A Killing' by Bob Torres. Great overview on the anarchist movement.

Now going to start 'Sexual Politics of Meat' by Carol J Adams.

Even though I hate his guts I still want to read this book, I just put it on hold at the library.

Miso Vegan
09-08-2008, 12:40 AM
I was about start The Yiddish Policemen's Union, but instead started Eats, Shoots and Leaves, which is enjoyable.

truepeacenik
09-09-2008, 12:13 AM
Twinkie, Deconstructed
it's a little weird in that I can't recall what the kosher version of twinkies tasted like, so I sort of make do with some descriptions.

KaliMama
09-09-2008, 02:44 AM
I was about start The Yiddish Policemen's Union, but instead started Eats, Shoots and Leaves, which is enjoyable.

I loved YIddish, but I've probably already said that in this thread...


Twinkie, Deconstructed
it's a little weird in that I can't recall what the kosher version of twinkies tasted like, so I sort of make do with some descriptions.

You just reminded me of this book (http://www.amazon.com/Winkie-Clifford-Chase/dp/0802143105/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1220941774&sr=8-1), about a teddy bear suspected of terrorist activities, which I read a little while ago and thoroughly enjoyed. :)

Last night I finished Don Delillo's White Noise (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Noise_(novel)), which I had picked up out of the free book pile at the library. It was phenomenal. I'll be reading more of his books now, kthx.

Now I'm reading Neal Stephenson's Snow Crash (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snow_Crash), which Timothy Leary descried as "a fantastic, slam-bang overdrive, supersurrealistic, comic-spooky whirl through a tomorrow that is already happening." It's hilarious and disheartening at the same time, as of page 35.

Miso Vegan
09-09-2008, 11:32 AM
I've heard that Stepheson's Anathem is awesome, have you read it?

sitting_vegan
09-09-2008, 01:31 PM
Even though I hate his guts I still want to read this book, I just put it on hold at the library.

Guthater! :D

He's been nice to me. Sent me a couple books on running.

KaliMama
09-09-2008, 02:17 PM
I've heard that Stepheson's Anathem is awesome, have you read it?

That's supposed to be out today. I'm on the list for it at the library. Whoever you heard that from is a fast reader! :laugh:

bluedawg
09-09-2008, 09:38 PM
i finally finished breaking dawn (book 4 in the twilight saga) last night, so i can again re-join the world of books written for adults. :silly:

Miso Vegan
09-09-2008, 09:59 PM
That's supposed to be out today. I'm on the list for it at the library. Whoever you heard that from is a fast reader! :laugh:

Oh, ha! it was a book reviewer I slightly know (I know his wife). Must've gotten an advance copy.

grog
09-09-2008, 10:07 PM
Guthater! :D

He's been nice to me. Sent me a couple books on running.

don't get him started! :silly:

bluedawg
09-26-2008, 08:09 PM
i'm currently reading thanking the monkey by karen dawn, and i'm almost halfway through. i'm "supposed to be" (according to my own loose plan for the day) reading it downstairs on the couch right now, but instead i'm here, waiting for y'all to write some stuff so i can read it and talk to you. :silly:

VegeTexan
09-26-2008, 08:17 PM
Just now finished "Day by Day Armageddon", a zombie novel. One of the best I've read.
Starting "Wet Work", another zombie novel.
I be in a mood.
:zombie:

TressaLou
09-26-2008, 08:58 PM
I'm reading Anticancer by David Servan-Schreiber, MD, PhD. It's all about how the average American lifestyle contributes to cancer and how to fix it. It's a good one!

veganshawn
09-26-2008, 10:29 PM
Just finished the Watchmen, it was amazing!

stegan
10-01-2008, 11:11 AM
currently reading Supercapitalism by Robert Reich. It's been a real eye opener; he talks at length about the social contract stuck between companies, government, labor and citizens in the middle part of the 20th century, and how that has been eroded. It's sort of a page turner- I can't wait to read the conclusions at the end. :)

veganshawn
10-01-2008, 11:24 AM
Absolute Sandman, Vol. 1 by Neil Gaiman - For the nerd in me, good so far.

A Peoples History of Sports in the USA by Dave Zirin - If you liked People's History of the US by Howard Zinn this the sports version, have not started it yet but heard an interview with the author on Democracy Now and he was really insightful.

Making A Killing by Bob Torres - Really dry and boring so far, I get that it is written for non-vegans as a way to convert them though left wing thought, but I thought I would enjoy a little more then I have so far. I am going to try and finish it though.

gladcow
10-01-2008, 11:25 AM
that sounds interesting, stegan. I've really enjoyed what he has had to say when I've seen him on the Maddow Show.

ahimsa
10-01-2008, 07:57 PM
Just finished: The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood
Now reading: The Audacity of Hope by Barack Obama

KaliMama
10-02-2008, 03:53 AM
veganshawn has half of my favorite comic books.

I really, really hope that the Watchmen movie doesn't suck.

Apple
10-02-2008, 08:16 AM
Currently reading Les Miserables. And I LOVE IT!!!

veganshawn
10-02-2008, 12:45 PM
I really, really hope that the Watchmen movie doesn't suck.

Hear Hear to that.

JasperKat
10-02-2008, 02:12 PM
Just finished: The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

I'm certain that I've already gushed about M.Atwood in this thread already, but too bad! I LOVE her. Her books are so amazing and personal. If you haven't read anything else of hers and you liked Handmaid's Tale, get thee to the library and check out Cat's Eye or Lady Oracle (don't be put off by the romancey cover). Cat's Eye is one of my all time favorite books, it is the most realistic portrayal (I'm sure I spelled that wrong :p) of friendship between girls that I have ever read. It nearly brought me to tears, even during the second and third (and fourth!) readings.

And if you've already read them, what did you think? :p

-JK

La Végétalienne
10-03-2008, 04:53 AM
Currently reading Les Miserables. And I LOVE IT!!!

Uh, oh. I'm sensing a showdown as soon as LesMiserablesLove sees this...

VegeTexan
10-19-2008, 09:56 PM
Reading "Wet Work", a zombie novel.
it's ok, but the zombies talk. I prefer the George Romero rules of zombies, they are slow, can't talk, driven by the need for human flesh.

One interesting part I read last night....one of the main characters was a vegetarian. When he died and came back he tried to suppress his hunger for humans. He looked in his fridge and found only tofu, tempeh, soymilk. He broke into a neighbors apartment and found raw meat in their fridge, but he couldn't keep it down. He wound up eating some of the meat of a dead human he found.

I am on a zombie book binge. I have another book waiting in the wings. I went on this binge shortly before the stock market crash. It seems to me that the zombie apocalypse
is a metaphor for the economic collapse of civilization.

Miso Vegan
10-20-2008, 12:18 AM
Just finished Yiddish Policemen's Union, and it was excellent. I liked Kavalier and Clay a bit more because it had more fun parts to it, but the use of the language in YPU was, almost imperceptibly, almost impossibly, a notch better than K&C.

TressaLou
10-20-2008, 09:32 PM
A new book by Gregory Maguire came out this week: A Lion Among Men, the third book in the Wicked series. I just started reading it yesterday, and it's pretty cool so far.

LesMiserablesLove
10-20-2008, 10:17 PM
Uh, oh. I'm sensing a showdown as soon as LesMiserablesLove sees this...

Ha, a showdown? The book is fantastic. I could do without the long speeches on French vernacular and politics, though. I'm a bigger fan of the musical.

Kap
10-20-2008, 11:50 PM
The Pig That Sang To the Moon...all about farm animals emotions....kinda boring though

KaliMama
10-21-2008, 01:29 AM
A new book by Gregory Maguire came out this week: A Lion Among Men, the third book in the Wicked series. I just started reading it yesterday, and it's pretty cool so far.

I'm waiting for that from the library! I loved Wicked, and Son of a Witch even more. I've read all of his books except for Lost. The library copy had food stains (oh, godz, I hope it was food...) between so many of the pages I couldn't stand it, and returned it unread. :umm:

KaliMama
10-21-2008, 01:30 AM
Just finished Yiddish Policemen's Union, and it was excellent. I liked Kavalier and Clay a bit more because it had more fun parts to it, but the use of the language in YPU was, almost imperceptibly, almost impossibly, a notch better than K&C.

I look forward to having enough time to read Kavalier and Clay someday.

gladcow
10-21-2008, 01:53 PM
I'm waiting for that from the library! I loved Wicked, and Son of a Witch even more. I've read all of his books except for Lost. The library copy had food stains (oh, godz, I hope it was food...) between so many of the pages I couldn't stand it, and returned it unread. :umm:

I thinks I has a copy of Lost at home. I'll check. If I do, I'll happily send it on. It's just sitting on my bookshelf, waitin' to be read :p

oldradical
10-21-2008, 03:25 PM
I just finished (last night) reading Che Guevara's Reminiscences of the Cuban Revolutionary War. He was a good writer, and there are photographs from the time that show the rebels in the Sierra Maestra. The relatively short part that he wrote about the military operations is supplemented by essays addressing other, more political, aspects...all of which were interconnected, of course.

It shows what a revolution is really like--not a pretty thing, but then, people don't revolt unless their lives have become desperate. It's an excellent book to read, if you want to know, on the day-to-day, mundane level, what such an undertaking looks like.

KaliMama
10-21-2008, 04:25 PM
I thinks I has a copy of Lost at home. I'll check. If I do, I'll happily send it on. It's just sitting on my bookshelf, waitin' to be read :p

Sweet! You are so awesome. :kiss:

TressaLou
10-21-2008, 10:25 PM
Yeah, Lost was definitely a great book. If gladcow doesn't have it, I'll be happy to send my copy along to you! :)

La Végétalienne
10-21-2008, 10:50 PM
Ha, a showdown? The book is fantastic. I could do without the long speeches on French vernacular and politics, though. I'm a bigger fan of the musical.

I just meant that you two might have to duke it out to see who's the bigger fan. I started reading Les Mis once and got a couple hundred pages into before realizing that it was the abriged version. I was like :brood: and then :o because it was already a big book. The translator/abridger noted in the preface that they had just taken out insignificant details, probably the politics you mention. Some day when I'm feeling really ambitious I want to try to slog through the original French.

quagga
10-22-2008, 04:40 PM
I think there are a lot of Margaret Atwood fans on VRF (I am one of them, too), so I thought I'd share a link to a NYT OpEd piece that she just wrote. Enjoy!

A Matter of Life and Debt (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/22/opinion/22atwood.html)
By MARGARET ATWOOD
Published: October 21, 2008


THIS week, credit has begun to loosen, stock markets have been encouraged enough to reclaim lost ground (at least for now) and there is a collective sigh of hope that lenders will begin to trust in the financial system again.

But we’re deluding ourselves if we assume that we can recover from the crisis of 2008 so quickly and easily simply by watching the Dow creep upward. The wounds go deeper than that. To heal them, we must repair the broken moral balance that let this chaos loose....

KaliMama
10-22-2008, 06:38 PM
I :heart: her!

Thanks for the link, that was a wonderful read.

gladcow
10-22-2008, 06:46 PM
I thinks I has a copy of Lost at home. I'll check. If I do, I'll happily send it on. It's just sitting on my bookshelf, waitin' to be read :p
alas, what I have at home is Mirror Mirror and Son of a Witch :umm:

Yeah, Lost was definitely a great book. If gladcow doesn't have it, I'll be happy to send my copy along to you! :)

tag! you're it! :p

TressaLou
10-22-2008, 08:57 PM
I'm waiting for that from the library! I loved Wicked, and Son of a Witch even more. I've read all of his books except for Lost. The library copy had food stains (oh, godz, I hope it was food...) between so many of the pages I couldn't stand it, and returned it unread. :umm:

PM me with your address and I can send Lost to you. :)

KaliMama
10-24-2008, 07:42 PM
I just came home from the library, where I lucked out and found another copy of Lost, without the mystery stains. Thanks so much for your generous offers, gladcow and TressaLou! :kiss:

TressaLou
10-24-2008, 08:57 PM
Sweet deal, KaliMama! I hope you like it! :D

michiganveganchick
10-24-2008, 10:24 PM
mystery stains

ew!

I just read Darkly Dreaming Dexter today (it was a pretty quick read and a very slow day at work), the book that the Showtime Show Dexter was based on. It was entertaining, but a lot of it was similar to Season 1 of the show. There are 2 more books in the series which I will probably end up reading at some point.

Now I'm on to Extremely Loud and Incrediby Close, and really looking forward to it.

oldradical
10-24-2008, 11:24 PM
Two books I picked up at the library yesterday are:

Random Acts of Senseless Violence, by Jack Womack, 1993. This is a sci-fi book written in a diary format by a young girl, set in Manhattan. Only read 26 pages so far, but it's engaging. I expect to read it all. No aliens or anything like that--it's more real life, but obviously not tending in the direction we count as familiar.

Gonzo: The Life of Hunter S. Thompson, an oral biography by Jann Wenner and Corey Seymour, 2007. The Intro is written by Johnny Depp, who apparently was a close friend of Thompson's...something I didn't know, since I don't usually follow celeb news. This is written as a series of relatively short reminiscences by people who knew Thompson, covering chronological parts of his life...so you get first, memories of him as a teenager, then a young man, and so on. Thompson was certainly not an entirely admirable character, but he engendered strong feelings in a lot of people who counted him as a friend. A "character" he was, that's for sure.

veganshawn
10-25-2008, 12:54 AM
Old Radical - I think HST and Johnny Depp got to be friends when Johnny Depp played him in Fear and Loathing.

KaliMama
10-25-2008, 01:08 AM
Extremely Loud and Incrediby Close

:heart: :heart: :heart: Amazing, powerful, sweet, sad, lovely, heartbreaking, incredible book. In my opinion.

While I was at the library, I also picked up the bell hooks book that oldradical mentioned in the feminism thread.

oldradical
10-27-2008, 11:28 AM
According to Depp's intro, they were pals prior to that time, Shawn.

Anyway...I want to mention another book I recently finished. The title is Massacre at Montsegur, which is about the campaign of the Roman Catholic church to suppress the heretical Cathar faith (also referred to as the Albigensian heresy). The reason I'm mentioning this here, is because the Cathars were the vegans of their time. I say this notwithstanding the fact that they ate fish, because they shared the view common in that era that fish were self-generating, like plants. Their perfecti (the holy men and women, their spiritual "elite") taught that it was wrong to kill any animals, because the Cathars believed in reincarnation...thus, it would be murder to slaughter any animal.

Naturally, I'm focusing on this one (important) point, because it's what I think might be of most interest here. I've read several books about the Cathars before, and it's a marvel to me that, in the midst of a reactionary, misogynistic culture of violent intolerance, Tours and the other Cathar cities were places where women had freedoms unique in all of Christendom, religious tolerance prevailed, and culture flourished (this is where and when the troubadors and the tradition of courtly love originated).

I'm not a Christian, so I've no "agenda" here...in case you wondered. Just thought this might be of some interest, as I said.

Dugan
10-27-2008, 01:04 PM
Me too, liking Margaret Atwood and Geoffrey Maguire. I've only seen 3 of his at the library - I had no idea he had the others. Must order...

gladcow
10-27-2008, 01:19 PM
Now I'm on to Extremely Loud and Incrediby Close, and really looking forward to it.

mmmmm :heart: I loved reading that book. So sad, so true, so wonderful.

VegeTexan
10-27-2008, 02:57 PM
Over the last couple of days I have been reading Infected, one of the most disturbing sci-fi/horror novels I have ever read.
http://www.amazon.com/Infected-Novel-Scott-Sigler/dp/030740630X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1225133204&sr=1-1

People get infected with spores from space and most of the book describes one man's efforts at self-mutilation to cut the growing alien parasites out of his body.

I cringed a lot. Gross, yet engrossing.

Dugan
10-27-2008, 06:43 PM
Sounds like a good one, VT!

Miso Vegan
10-27-2008, 07:06 PM
I'm about 3/4 through Empress which was either not well-written or not well-translated. However, it's a historical fiction, and some parts are interesting from that perspective (how the courts of emperors in China were arranged, the ranks and roles of wives, concubines, etc.).

oldradical
10-27-2008, 08:18 PM
I'm not usually a fan of historical fiction, but was reasonably pleased with Shogun, which I read half a lifetime ago. The sequel was reasonably good, too, as I recall.

Mary Renault has written a number of historical fiction books; the one I recall having liked was The Persian Boy (also read forever ago).

Miso Vegan
10-27-2008, 08:53 PM
I'm not usually a fan of historical fiction


Apparently I'm not, either.

bluedawg
11-09-2008, 03:48 PM
i read the little prince (by antoine de saint-exupery) last night, for the very first time.

vegankitty
11-09-2008, 04:29 PM
i read the little prince (by antoine de saint-exupery) last night, for the very first time.

I read that in French class in 8th grade! I love that book!

I'm re=reading Dracula. I started a Vampire Bookclub Meetup and that's our first book. I'm nervous about whether anyone will show. I picked a combination NFS/cafe that makes awesome smoothies so even if no one shows I'll get to treat myself.

michiganveganchick
11-09-2008, 07:32 PM
i read the little prince (by antoine de saint-exupery) last night, for the very first time.

:smitten: my 11th grade French 3 teacher had us read that book.

Miso Vegan
11-10-2008, 12:51 AM
i read the little prince (by antoine de saint-exupery) last night, for the very first time.

Aw, that warms my heart! I probably have already blabbed it here, but I own a copy of the book in every language I could find it in, in every country I've visited. French, Czech, Spanish, German, Dutch ... I feel like I'm forgetting some.

And I have a tattoo! (The one titled, roughly, "the best picture that, later, I was able to draw of him.")

mamaquilla
11-12-2008, 12:05 AM
I am reading
The Places That Scare You - A guide to fearlessness in difficult times
by Pema Chodron

Have read her book When Things Fall Apart, very very good!

KaliMama
11-12-2008, 12:21 AM
When Things Fall Apart, very very good!

That is a wonderful book!

michiganveganchick
11-12-2008, 04:08 PM
Amazing, powerful, sweet, sad, lovely, heartbreaking, incredible book. In my opinion.

agreed! :heart: i loved his storytelling style in everything is illuminated, but i was still blown away. if i hadn't promised to ship it off to my aunt to borrow, i would go back and re-read some of the earlier parts.

i was stuck home today without power so i dug into twilight. it will be a quick read, but it's really engaging. i'm sucked in (no vampire pun intended! :p)

bluedawg
11-12-2008, 04:40 PM
yay, another grownup twilight victim! :silly:

i'm currently reading four second-draft chapters of an interpersonal communication textbook. i have to review them by friday. so why am i on VRF, you ask? good question!

La Végétalienne
11-12-2008, 08:56 PM
i read the little prince (by antoine de saint-exupery) last night, for the very first time.

Yaaaaaaay! I swear, they read that book in every French class ever. I wrote my college essay on it. :heart:

Miso Vegan
11-12-2008, 10:23 PM
bluedawg, what did you think of it?

What I seem to find is that it doesn't have as much meanign for people if they read it as an adult. But if it's a story they heard in their childhood, it's particularly special.

michiganveganchick
11-12-2008, 10:53 PM
But if it's a story they heard in their childhood, it's particularly special.

i think that rings true for a lot of books i read in childhood. i remember you're not a fan of harry potter :silly: but i wish i could have read those books when i was younger. i vividly remember a book i read when i was little about this boy who ordered wings through the mail. his parents went out of town and he would eat tv dinners and was able to fly with these wings. my parents left us home with my aunt for a week when they went on vacation, and i remember seriously believing that i might be able to find some wings and fly while they were gone. reading as a grown-up is never that cool!!! :laugh:

michiganveganchick
11-12-2008, 11:32 PM
yay, another grownup twilight victim! :silly:

i read the whole book today. i guess it was a little addictive :silly:

bluedawg
11-13-2008, 02:03 AM
i read the whole book today. i guess it was a little addictive :silly:

time to start on books 2 through 4! :silly:

Miso, i'm afraid to say what i thought of the little prince. it was given to me as a gift by a friend who has always LOVED the book, and i know it's a favorite of many here, so i was all psyched to read the Best Book Ever, and honestly i was kind of, "um...?" by the end. i loved that the fox had all the good lines :silly: but there were a few times where i thought, surely i'm missing some grand point here. so i've chosen to reflect for awhile, and also read about it some more. :silly:

Miso Vegan
11-13-2008, 11:22 AM
Yeah, that's what I hear from adults who didn't read it as a kid. I think the reason it resonates with those of us who read it as kids is that we probably read it at about the age that the lessons in the book - friendship, true beauty, faithfulness - are novel and meaningful.

So it may interest you to know a bit about the biography of Saint-Exupery. He was a pilot back when the airplanes were open-cockpit style (I'm sure there's a name for it). He flew air mail on a particularly dangerous route from France into Africa. (He later flew even more dangerous routes, over the Andes into Peru.)
One day he had engine troubles and landed in the middle of the Sahara. He had very little water and no food, and was having trouble repairing the engine. He took to wandering out away from the plane, looking for help, and coming back at night. After, I think 7 days, he wandered away from his plane, completely delirious, and was ultimately found, in the nick of time.

In his delirium, he hallucinated, and from that came the story of Le Petit Prince. Who could well have been Saint-Exupery himself, talking to snakes and all.

gladcow
11-13-2008, 02:14 PM
I have never read The Little Prince. And I love it still. My typing teacher in high school required us to watch the movie. It was from the seventies, with Bob Fosse as the snake and Gene Wilder as the fox (best. casting. ever.) I have loved every bit of the Little Prince since then, but still have never read it.

gladcow
11-13-2008, 02:15 PM
I'm currently reading Politics by Adam Thirlwell. It is not about politics :p

Emiloid
11-13-2008, 11:43 PM
I just read Freak the Mighty and thought it was one of the best books I've read in a long time. Seriously. It's amazing. :)

Oh yeah, and I loved The Little Prince when I was little... I mean, maybe 9 or 10? I haven't read it since then, but I still have my old copy. I also loved The Catcher in the Rye (which I read in high school), but when I recommended it to a friend in college he didn't really like it all that much. I think it's probably similar to how people react to The Little Prince.

Miso Vegan
11-14-2008, 01:48 AM
It took me far too long but I finished Empress. Alas, I cannot recommend it. :umm:

lullured
11-16-2008, 02:03 AM
I read the The Little Prince first time as an adult and liked it, but maybe it didn't make as much of an impact as it would have if I had read it as a child.

Anyway, I still think it was a good book and I got it for only a dollar :p

Right now I'm reading about how to bake with emmer, spelt and kamut, but to mix it a little I have just borrowed My name is Salma by Fadia Faqir.

AhimsaBland
11-17-2008, 05:47 AM
I managed to get excellent conditioned copies of "Brave New World" By Aldous Huxley and "A Farewell to Arms" by Ernest Hemmingway from a second hand bookstore for $12 so I'm trying to read both at the same time as well as a book on the Practical Psychology of Yoga.

Reading is the best thing i've ever learnt to do for sure!

channelz
11-17-2008, 03:34 PM
Sadly, I don't have time to read except for class assignments (too many papers!) but I love what I'm reading in my sociology class, its so interesting and eye opening! It's called "Global Lockdown:Race, Gender, and the Prison Industrial Complex" by Julia Sudbury.

michiganveganchick
11-18-2008, 09:22 PM
time to start on books 2 through 4! :silly:

done! :sweat:

*now, off to see the movie :laugh:

La Végétalienne
11-18-2008, 09:33 PM
bluedawg, what did you think of it? What I seem to find is that it doesn't have as much meanign for people if they read it as an adult. But if it's a story they heard in their childhood, it's particularly special.
The author does spend quite a lot of time talking about how adults just don't understand things. I think people who read it while young can identify with that feeling of not being understood (and with Le Petit Prince himself), whereas adults who didn't read it as children identify more with the narrator, who himself is a bit baffled by LPP.
Plus I think any time someone tells you about The Best --- Ever it's bound to be a bit disappointing.

bekah-chan
11-23-2008, 04:13 AM
i just finished reading catcher in the rye which was so much better than i expected! see, the more people hype something up the less i expect from it. but catcher really is as great as everyone makes it out to be.

but now i'm reading 1984 which i started a while ago but sadly never got around to finishing, as i was sidetracked. i know people say it was a great prediction, but seriously, it's sad how right he was.. and scary.

i also started reading cunt, a great little feminist book! so far i like that too!

i also picked up a bunch of other books yesterday which i can't wait to start reading, including the unbearable lightness of being, and the average american male, which my friend says is hilarious yet obscene, so that should get interesting.

KaliMama
11-23-2008, 04:35 PM
Just in case I am not the only vegan who never heard of this place before:

AK Press (http://www.akpress.org/)



AK Press is a worker-run collective that publishes and distributes radical books, visual and audio media, and other mind-altering material. We're small: a dozen people who work long hours for short money, because we believe in what we do. We're anarchists, which is reflected both in the books we provide and in the way we organize our business. Decisions at AK Press are made collectively, from what we publish, to what we distribute and how we structure our labor. All the work, from sweeping floors to answering phones, is shared. When the telemarketers call and ask, "who's in charge?" the answer is: everyone. Our goal isn't profit (although we do have to pay the rent). Our goal is supplying radical words and images to as many people as possible. The books and other media we distribute are published by independent presses, not the corporate giants. We make them widely available to help you make positive (or, hell, revolutionary) changes in the world. As you probably know, the stuff we carry is less and less available from the corporate publishers and their chain stores.

Here is their Veg/AR selection (http://www.akpress.org/2005/topics/VegetarianAnimalRights).

Parents/educators: have any of you read/used this activity book? Opinions?

I Love Animals and Broccoli (http://www.akpress.org/2006/items/iloveanimalsandbroccoli)

stegan
11-23-2008, 05:19 PM
About halfway through Galapagos by Kurt Vonnegut. Worldwide financial crisis caused by an absence of faith in paper money and governments, population decimated by worldwide spread of virus... Um, I'm not sure I want to know how this one ends. :)

vegematic
11-23-2008, 06:06 PM
Wait, are you reading a book or the newspaper?

Happy Ash
11-26-2008, 10:25 PM
Just started reading John Hanson Mitchell's 'Ceremonial Time: Fifteen Thousand Years On One Square Mile' for the third time. I love that dreamy non-fiction.

Best thing about having a poor memory is that you can read the same books you love over and over and not get bored.

Shion
11-27-2008, 12:11 AM
Currently reading: The Way of Shadows By: Brent Weeks (this is a really interesting fantasy novel, except the Warrens are absolutely disgusting and there are times I want to reach through the pages and strangle the main character), The Colour of Magic By: Terry Pratchette :heart: (the Graphic Novel, best stuff since Hitchhikers), and Sandworms of Dune (very slow in reading this, I am getting sick and tired of people waiting around for some prophet to show them the way to kill a bunch of hyper intelligent machines).

I will probably finish "A History of Women in America" tonight, an interesting read, but the thought processes of the Victorian Era, really, really, tick me off.:mad:

vegankitty
11-27-2008, 11:22 AM
I am reading Fledgling by Octavia Butler. It's a vampire story I'm thinking of using for my book club. Next up is The God Delusion.

vegematic
11-27-2008, 11:46 AM
I've mostly been catching up on my Sky&Telescopes while on vacation this week. Yeah, I'm a geek. Wanna make something of it?
-vegematic

Dugan
11-27-2008, 01:08 PM
My geek pick the past few days has been the US Army Map Reading and Land Navigation Handbook (http://www.amazon.com/U-S-Army-Reading-Navigation-Handbook/dp/1592283829/ref=pd_cp_b_2?pf_rd_p=413864201&pf_rd_s=center-41&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=097590096X&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=0A9ZB0WPAWTQCT9DMAJ6). Excellent info about map interpretation & planning navigation in spite of all the typos. I didn't think I'd ever need the sections about escape & evasion or avoiding fire fights until I read of a hiker getting shot at. :mad:

gladcow
11-27-2008, 05:44 PM
finished Politics. Liked it. Felt that the story-telling style grew old at the end.

now reading Flight by Sherman Alexie. Man, I forgot how much I :heart: his writing. it's super-good.

Shion
11-27-2008, 05:55 PM
I am reading Fledgling by Octavia Butler. It's a vampire story I'm thinking of using for my book club. Next up is The God Delusion.

The God Delusion was a really good read. Got me thinking.

lullured
11-29-2008, 03:15 AM
Any ideas for good books to start out with if you want to read about feminism?

vegankitty
11-29-2008, 01:52 PM
Any ideas for good books to start out with if you want to read about feminism?

Backlash by Susan Faludi is great. Female Chauvinist Pigs is good , more recent. Full Frontal Feminism by Jessica Valenti , who also has a good website-feministsting.com.

lullured
11-30-2008, 02:38 AM
Backlash by Susan Faludi is great. Female Chauvinist Pigs is good , more recent. Full Frontal Feminism by Jessica Valenti , who also has a good website-feministsting.com.

Thanks, I'm reading more about them now :)

vegakata
11-30-2008, 05:00 AM
I am reading Archipelag Gulag by Solesenitcii...From a spiritual point of you one can see that punishment is not let out- to the cruelty to animals peolpe will get similar and ...oh, it is a sad story, a horrible historical fact, really. In all our history we humans have been doing bad!!!! I often say that with just an intelligence that was necessary for inventing the wheel some thousands years ago- the human race could have invent some great non-violant living...Then the history of ours would have been better. No GULAG etc

kaylie likes plurr
11-30-2008, 10:59 PM
I'm reading ...as much as I feel weird to admit this ...
"Your scars are beautiful to god"

I'm not a big religious person - never, ever have been.
but in the summer, when i went with my moms church on
a medical mission in panama i met someone [who went with us]
who had gone through alot as a child, something i totally didn't
expect, and she knew a bit about me, and reccomended it to me.
my mom finally got it for me, and I'm reading it.
I think I believe in god though. Not positive.
I go on and off with believeing, sorry I know thats totally off topic.

anyways, your scars are beautiful to god, actually a good, good book. makes me feel not alone, it's nice. although sometimes stuff in there really, really, really pisses me off, but other than that .... lol


next it'll be "one can make a difference" by ....who else but ingrid newkirk >_< hha

gladcow
12-01-2008, 12:49 AM
I'm about to read They Shall Know Our Velocity, Sex, Drugs and Cocoa Puffs and Foreskin's Lament on my vacation! :D

Jessica?
12-01-2008, 04:45 AM
i'm reading A Million Little Pieces
it's good
i don't care if he lied about some of it:p

gladcow
12-01-2008, 11:53 AM
I really liked that book, too Jessica?. I read it before the big hubub, though, so maybe that's part of it :p

kaylie likes plurr
12-01-2008, 03:49 PM
I LOVED a million little peices and Sex Drugs &Cocoa puffs was a pretty good book too

Jessica?
12-01-2008, 04:49 PM
I LOVED a million little peices and Sex Drugs &Cocoa puffs was a pretty good book too

!!! i have heard about Sex Drugs &Cocoa puffs
a kid in my english class was reading it and he said he loved it

has anyone here read the book "The Daydreamer" when they were little, that book was so awesome, i want to hunt it down and read it again:D

kaylie likes plurr
12-01-2008, 04:53 PM
i have that book...havent read it yet though

stegan
12-01-2008, 04:57 PM
Wait, are you reading a book or the newspaper?
Hard to tell at points. :)

Next up- Liar's Poker by Michael Lewis- it's a first hand account of what it was like to work in a brokerage house in the 80's. He wrote it to be a shocking, cautionary tale. He himself was shocked when it became a handbook/blueprint for Wall Street noobs.

JasperKat
12-11-2008, 03:51 PM
I'm Just Here for More Food by Alton Brown (and it is sooooo good! perfect for a food geek like me!)

Okay, I know this post is 3 years old, but can I request a book review? :p Mr K and I like watching Good Eats occasionally and I was thinking that he might like an Alton Brown book for Xmas, but they seem to be meat-heavy. Aside from recipes, the book preview on AB's site show several pages of "meat cut diagrams". They're drawings, not pictures, but I'm wondering if the sciencey stuff makes up for the meaty stuff. What say you, Published Cookbook Author and Self-Professed Food Geek?

-JK

gladcow
12-11-2008, 04:31 PM
Okay, I know this post is 3 years old, but can I request a book review? :p Mr K and I like watching Good Eats occasionally and I was thinking that he might like an Alton Brown book for Xmas, but they seem to be meat-heavy. Aside from recipes, the book preview on AB's site show several pages of "meat cut diagrams". They're drawings, not pictures, but I'm wondering if the sciencey stuff makes up for the meaty stuff. What say you, Published Cookbook Author and Self-Professed Food Geek?

-JK
okay, so. I have I'm Just Here For the Food (book 1), I'm Just Here For More Food (book 2), and Alton Brown's Tools For Your Kitchen (or sumthin) (book 3). book 1 is very meaty. It has 4 fabulous veg recipes that I've used more than once (micro popcorn, dutch oven beans, something with ramen, and a veggie dish I'm forgetting). It's not worth the price, for vegans. book 2 is all about baking. it's astonishingly easy to understand, yet detailed. it has all measurements in cups as well as weight (*swoon*) and is organized in a way that makes my knees weak (ie very food geekily). I have veganized many a thing and they have all been awesome (my fav are the old fashioned muffins and the rum coconut waffles). the veganizing can be a little tricky, though, because he uses single yolks and other hard to be sure what to do kind of ingredients. I lurve this book. book 3 is all about what to have in your kitchen, what not to have (unitaskers!), and how to find a good one of whatever you are looking for. it's been awhile since I read it, but I think it goes into organization and ingredients a bit, too. maybe. great for a good read all the way through, and I've used it as a reference more than once when buying something new. the section on knives alone was great.

JasperKat
12-11-2008, 05:12 PM
Cool, thanks for the info! Still torn on whether I should buy it for the hub, he wouldn't be interested in the recipes and veganizing them as much as the science behind it all. Gear for your Kitchen sounds like it might appeal to him. Maybe I'll hit the library Saturday and see if they have a copy of either I'm Just Here for More Food or GftK.

-JK

AmandaMI
12-11-2008, 06:22 PM
Slightly off-topic, but Alton brown is getting less hot, don't you think? :blank:

gladcow
12-11-2008, 07:19 PM
yeah. wtf is up with the long hair? :confused: sad sad sad

mamaquilla
12-11-2008, 07:39 PM
His hair is truly tragic right now!

JasperKat
12-11-2008, 07:43 PM
I haven't watched in awhile, does he have a mop now? Trying to appeal to the shaggy kids?

-JK

mamaquilla
12-11-2008, 07:46 PM
I think its more remenicent of 70's geekboy? or or or, help me people :silly:

nauthiz
12-11-2008, 08:33 PM
Looks kinda '70s Clark Kent to me.

AmandaMI
12-11-2008, 08:49 PM
Yep, I saw his grape juice commercial, and was very bummed about the hair. :( Not even shaggy, just...bad.

vegankitty
12-11-2008, 09:16 PM
I'm reading Jungian Archetypes : Jung , Godel and the History of Archetypes. It combines a history of mathematics with a history of psychlogy upto Jung. The psychology parts are fascinating but the mathematics parts make my head hurt.

sitting_vegan
12-11-2008, 10:05 PM
Poor Alton. Yes, the hair-not so good.

gladcow
12-11-2008, 11:09 PM
over my vacation, I read Foreskin's Lament by Shalom Auslander, Sex, Drugs & Cocoa Puffs by Chuck Klosterman, You Shall Feel Our Velocity by Dave Eggers and started re-reading Still Life With Woodpecker by Tom Robbins. They were all well above average and I enjoyed the hell out of em. And I just realized my four literary boyfriends :blush:

vegankitty
12-11-2008, 11:21 PM
I love Tom Robbins! Jitterbug Perfume is one of my all time favorites.

Calliope
12-12-2008, 01:33 AM
You Shall Know Our Velocity by Dave Eggers

:heart: :heart: :heart:
That's one of my favourite books ever!!!! If you enjoyed that, you should check out A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius by him. It's really good as well. It's written in the same sort of style, but it's more autobiographical. There's a section in the middle where it kind of loses steam, but otherwise it's really good. :)

JasperKat
12-12-2008, 09:41 AM
over my vacation, I read Foreskin's Lament by Shalom Auslander, Sex, Drugs & Cocoa Puffs by Chuck Klosterman, You Shall Know Our Velocity by Dave Eggers and started re-reading Still Life With Woodpecker by Tom Robbins. They were all well above average and I enjoyed the hell out of em. And I just realized my four literary boyfriends :blush:

I have read and love three of those four books, so now I have to get to the library and see if they have Foreskin's Lament!

And I second Calliope's suggestion for AHWoSG, it's amazing. Ah-mazing.

Alton: no no no :no: It is not a good look. Men with round faces look much better with short hair as a general rule. I do kinda want some grape juice now... Maybe the magic's still there!

-JK

phloxy
12-12-2008, 10:01 AM
started re-reading Still Life With Woodpecker by Tom Robbins.

Awesome book. One of my favorites. It's never too late to have a happy childhood! :)

gladcow
12-12-2008, 02:13 PM
I love Tom Robbins! Jitterbug Perfume is one of my all time favorites.
that is my all time favorite Robbins book. I have a signed copy :smitten:


:heart: :heart: :heart:
That's one of my favourite books ever!!!! If you enjoyed that, you should check out A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius by him. It's really good as well. It's written in the same sort of style, but it's more autobiographical. There's a section in the middle where it kind of loses steam, but otherwise it's really good. :)
have it, read it. LOVE that at the beginning he tells the reader that the middle is middling :p

I have read and love three of those four books, so now I have to get to the library and see if they have Foreskin's Lament!

I'm loving Auslander. I'm reading Beware of God as soon as I can find it!


Awesome book. One of my favorites. It's never too late to have a happy childhood! :)
I read it so long ago and I'm enjoying rereading it. the husb read it on the flight to Hawaii and he quite liked it. I'm glad that he's getting into Robbins :heart:

phloxy
12-12-2008, 03:15 PM
I read it so long ago and I'm enjoying rereading it. the husb read it on the flight to Hawaii and he quite liked it. I'm glad that he's getting into Robbins :heart:

It's so good he read it so now he, too, will know how to make love stay. :love:

gladcow
12-12-2008, 03:25 PM
It's so good he read it so now he, too, will know how to make love stay. :love:

true :happy: :heart: :love:

(he's pretty good at the love part already :blush:)

Calliope
12-12-2008, 03:33 PM
I'm (re-) reading Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides. It's one of my favourites, and it's also where my VRF name came from. :) It's really interesting, I've never read a book that had a hermaphrodite as the main character, and it's done in a really respectful way. Definitely brought my attention to a lot of things I hadn't considered before.

You should all go read it now. :)

gladcow
12-12-2008, 05:04 PM
that is on my list, Calliope! :yes:

Calliope
12-12-2008, 08:05 PM
Nice!! :)

JasperKat
12-12-2008, 10:33 PM
You should all go read it now. :)

Read it! Liked it! Virgin Suicides was good, too :yes:

-JK

Calliope
12-13-2008, 01:38 AM
Read it! Liked it! Virgin Suicides was good, too :yes:

-JK

I haven't read that one yet. I've been meaning to get to it. :)

vegankitty
12-13-2008, 02:33 AM
Middlesex sounds really interesting. I just ordered it from Amazon. (Like I need any more books. Any thread involving purchasable goods is a bad influence on me.)

peaches
12-13-2008, 02:12 PM
What is the What by Dave Eggers is also really good. it's an autobiography that he wrote for someone else if that makes sense... it's about a Sudanese refugee

A Winter's Tale by Mark Helprin and The Bone People by Keri Hulme are also AMAZING books

currently reading Saving fish from Drowning by Amy Tan and Censored 2003

Greenconsciousness
12-13-2008, 03:42 PM
Why not just get already vegan recipe books or a subscription to Vegetarian Times magazine?

I think the all time best vegan cookbooks are by Joanne Stepaniak and my favorite is "Vegan Vittles". But she has a lot of cookbooks and they are all great. I also love "Tofu Cookery" by Louise Hagler

Greenconsciousness
12-13-2008, 03:44 PM
I have no idea why this post showed up here - I was answering someone about cookbooks - then it said i wasn't logged in which I was -then my post showed up here?????

rick green
12-16-2008, 02:31 PM
The heart that bleeds: dispatches from latin america by Alma Guillermoprieto. This was good journalism from the early nineties.

Aunt Julia and the scriptwriter by Mario Vargas Llosa. This is a fun novel.

Yay books. :)

peaches
12-23-2008, 03:30 PM
just finished Divisadero and The English Patient by Michael Ondaatje
both highly recommended

also, A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini

gladcow
12-23-2008, 03:40 PM
just finished Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood. Now working on The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian by Sherman Alexie. I'm passing it on to the boy when I'm done. Both books get a biiiig :thumbsup:

vegankitty
12-23-2008, 05:41 PM
just finished Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood. Now working on The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian by Sherman Alexie. I'm passing it on to the boy when I'm done. Both books get a biiiig :thumbsup:

I love Margaret Atwood! Cat's Eye is one of my favorite books ever.

Since I got my iPhone I've been reading less. I play wurdle on the train instead of reading. I got the new Wally Lamb book though and Middlesex , both of which I'm excited to read. Also 2 Robert Heinlein novels. I got a gift card for Barnes and Noble.

squirrel
12-24-2008, 04:03 PM
Right now I'm reading 2 books, one at work on lunch and one at home...A Diet For A New America and The Pig Who Sang To The Moon. :)

KaliMama
01-08-2009, 07:57 PM
Now I'm reading Neal Stephenson's Snow Crash (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snow_Crash), which Timothy Leary descried as "a fantastic, slam-bang overdrive, supersurrealistic, comic-spooky whirl through a tomorrow that is already happening." It's hilarious and disheartening at the same time, as of page 35.


I've heard that Stepheson's Anathem is awesome, have you read it?

I never finished Snow Crash, it was too frantic for my liking. deadlyhead read it, and said it settled down and got really good and that I should give it another shot.

Anathem... it's overdue at the library and I've still got 150 pages to go. :( I love it. And I love xkcd:

http://krishnamama.com/images/fiction_rule_of_thumb.png

Hover text: Except for anything by Lewis Carroll or Tolkien, you get five made-up words per story. I'm looking at you, Anathem.

:laugh: :blank:

As for the made-up words, all I'm saying is "jeejah" beats them all. Especially if it pronounced "yee-ha" as d suggested.

gladcow
01-08-2009, 08:01 PM
I'm currently on a "finish books I've started" trend. Finished Absolutely True Diary..., finished Flight (mental note: don't read two Sherman Alexie coming-of-age stories back to back or else you will be confused about who is who), working my way through The Know It All right now and then I'll have to move on to the Steve Martin autobio that I never finished (because I didn't want it to end :p)

La Végétalienne
01-09-2009, 01:20 AM
KM, I'm reading A Clockwork Orange, which is chock-full of made-up slang. The problem is, I'm reading about a gazillion books right now, so I start to get a handle on the words, but then I switch books and have to start all over again when I come back to it.

gladcow, I was just thinking about the movie Smoke Signals the other day; I had a minor obsession with it in high school. (It's based on one of Alexie's novels- The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven I believe it was.)

gladcow
01-09-2009, 11:51 AM
LaVeg, I had another friend recommend that movie recently, I'm going to have to get my eyes on it! :)

La Végétalienne
01-09-2009, 07:28 PM
:yes: Soooo good! I want to watch it now!

Emiloid
01-09-2009, 08:40 PM
KM, I'm reading A Clockwork Orange, which is chock-full of made-up slang. The problem is, I'm reading about a gazillion books right now, so I start to get a handle on the words, but then I switch books and have to start all over again when I come back to it.
Classics are exempt from the made-up words limit. :)

ganymeder
01-10-2009, 12:17 PM
Okay, I prefer to read ereader books on my Palm Pilot, especially since I can get most for free and also I can read them in the dark in bed (backlit)...

Ereader
Doctor Who and the Empire of Glass
The Moon Voyage (reading to my son as a bedtime story) by Jules Verne

paperback
The Hobbit (rereading to my son)
Double Star by Heinlein (got through PBS from another VFFer)

Hardback
Farm Sanctuary by Gene Baur (I'm having a hard time getting into it actually. It seems very welfarist which makes me cringe a bit even though I regularly support FS)

Last Chance to See by Douglas Adams (my favorite author! - rereading it so just off and on)

vegankitty
01-10-2009, 01:35 PM
KM, Snow Crash and The Diamond A (also by Neal Stephenson) are two of my favorites. I love cyberpunk stuff.

I got an e-reader on my iphone but I haven't used it. Before I saw that I bought Anna Karenina for .99 cents. I just can't get into the ebooks. I like the feel of a book. But I never thought about the backlighting.That would be great for reading in bed at night.

My bookclub meetup is tomorrow night.Last time it was full (I put a 10 person limit) and only one showed up. He picked this months book so I'm sure he'll come again. Its full again but this time we have really bad weather again , just like the first one.

Anyway , we read Anno Dracula by Kim Newman which I enjoyed.It mixes a lot of fictional characters in with real people in Victorian England and they hunt Jack the Ripper.

I'm also reading I Will Fear No Evil by Robert Heinlein. I might have said that already because I've been reading it a while. My iphone is bad for my reading because I play Scrabble and A Boggle type game obsessively on the subway.

nauthiz
01-11-2009, 12:04 PM
I just polished off The Last Best League (http://www.curledup.com/lastbest.htm) by Jim Collins. Very much worth a read if you're even remotely interested in baseball.

ganymeder
01-11-2009, 05:21 PM
I tried to read "I will fear no evil" by Heinlein, but it was just sooooo... misogynistic I couldn't take it. I thought after the annoying female character died that it would get better, but I couldn't take it. Do you like it? Did it get better?

If you change your mind about the ereader books, you can get free ones at http://www.manybooks.net (http://www.manybooks.net) They're mostly public domain with some Creative Commons ones too like Corey Doctorow's cyberpunk stuff. It's one of my favorite sites. :)

nauthiz
01-11-2009, 05:42 PM
I liked Heinlein a lot when I was younger. Now, the main thing I notice when I try to read him is the massively wacked-out sexual politics.

I think his short stories tend to have less of a problem with it than his novels do.

ganymeder
01-12-2009, 09:03 AM
After reading several of his books, I've developed my own rule of thumb for consuming Heinlein fiction.

anything written in the 1950's is okay, albeit some bearable 50's style sexism, but not necessarily over the top. Some of his stuff is at least equally sexist to men and women from this time period.

anything post 1950 is "iffy" but as the decades progress the chances of it being unreadable increase exponentially.

The one exception is "Stranger in a strange land." That book is INCREDIBLE. Now, it gets very sexy and kinky towards the end, but it's still the best novel he's written imo. I read the uncensored version (trade paperback) that was released recently (last year?). The editor apparently had him cut out like a quarter of the book, and I've just gotten a mass paperback copy (older print so it has the cuts). I'm going to read that and see how it compares just out of curiousity. Well, that and I gave my other copy away. ;)

I'm going to try to get some of his Juvenile fiction. I've heard they're really good, and I'm betting it'll be more story and less sexism.

Just my two cents! lol :D