PDA

View Full Version : what are you reading?



Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 6 [7] 8 9 10 11 12

stegan
10-01-2007, 01:03 PM
"The Sex Lives of Cannibals (Adrift in the Equatorial Pacific)" by J. Maarten Troost- a memoir of the author moving to a South Pacific atoll with his girlfriend when she gets a job with an NGO there- it's sad, and hilarious. I'm rather enjoying it. :)

Flower
10-01-2007, 05:28 PM
The Good Guy by Dean Koontz

The Frumious Bandersnatch
10-01-2007, 06:02 PM
Regency Buck by Georgette Heyer: a period drama with a wonderful heroine, it's a frightfully romantic!

diffuse
10-01-2007, 10:29 PM
oh! a lot of fantasy authors whom i like have cited heyer as an influence, hee!

i just finished reading the secret history of moscow, by ekaterina sedia, which is an amazing urban fantasy novel. i highly recommend it for folks who like that sort of thing. :)

LazyGirl
10-06-2007, 07:35 PM
I just finished Refuse to Choose by Barbara Sher. Here is a review of it that I posted to my e-group earlier today:

I have just finished my first reading of Barbara Sher's latest book, Refuse to Choose. I don't think that I've seen anyone here mention it, but even if I've somehow overlooked it, I feel this book is worthy of being mentioned several times. I suggest that you get this book on your very next trip to the library or bookstore. In fact, I even think it's worth a special trip.

Refuse to Choose is all about the type of person that Ms. Sher refers to as "Scanners". A Scanner is someone who has many different interests. Unlike people who have one or maybe even two grand passions or specialties, Scanners are interested in everything. The idea of having to focus on a single area of interest makes them depressed. These are the people who have trouble choosing a college major or a lifelong profession, who start dozens of projects but appear not to finish any of them (more on that in the book), who seem to have a new interest or hobby every week. Scanners go off on tangents. They get bored with topics once they've learned everything they need to know about them, and they lose interest in things once they've mastered them. Scanners are committment-phobes; they hesitate to focus on one thing because they are afraid that they will miss something else. The down side to all of this is that our society is set up in such a way that many Scanners feel like losers - like they will never amount to anything because they have not found their One True Purpose in Life.

Does any of that sound familiar? I am willing to bet that there are quite a few Scanners in this group. [I think there are quite a few Scanners on VRF as well.] There is not a doubt in my mind that WireWoman is one, for example. I am one, too. Over the years, I have come to own my "scatterbrained", "flaky", and restless nature. I have, in the past, generally blamed this on my astrological sign (Libra) and the fact that I am part of that generation that everyone loves to hate, "X" (aka the Slacker Generation). I have always, however, been ambivalent about my slackertude. On the one hand, I am glad that I have many interests and skills and that I am resourceful and knowledgeable about many things; on the other hand, I occasionally find myself thinking that I have wasted my potential because I have not scored a big title and big salary at an impressive firm. I ranked 6th in my graduating high school class of 324 and graduated magna cum laude from
college; people had big plans for me, and I have not fulfilled many, if any, of them.

Refuse to Choose is a workbook designed to help people like me design a life that includes all of our interests *and* provides the resources - time, energy, and money - to pursue more. The first part of the book focuses on recognizing yourself as a Scanner and figuring out what makes you tick. There's an exercise in the book designed to help you figure out what your "reward" is - why you abandon projects before you are (seemingly) finished with them. Sher spends time busting up the various internalized myths and assumptions that make Scanners feel as if they will never amount to anything. She has a real knack for helping people shift their perception. For example, I've always felt that I haven't really done anything with my life. Through one of the exercises in the book, I now see that I have actually done quite a bit, and even lots of things that other people only dream about doing.

Part Two of the book helps you to identify what type of Scanner you are and presents various Life Design Models and career suggestions based on the characteristics of each type. For example, a Serial Specialist - a Scanner who likes to delve deeply into a subject for a period of time and then move on to a new one - would benefit from the Walter Mitty Life Design Model and an Umbrella career (writer, public speaker, information broker, consultant, librarian, etc.) so that they could get paid to pursue various interests. Throughout the book, Sher presents many tools to help Scanners create the life that they want: the Scanner Daybook, the Avocation Station, the Life's Work Bookshelf, and the Show-and-Tell Party, to name a few. I have not been this impressed with a self-help book in a long time. So much so that I actually intend to go back through the book and do all of the exercises - something that I *never* do.

If you have even the faintest suspicion that you might be a Scanner, I hope that by now I've convinced you to go and get this book. You'll thank me for it later.

bluedawg
10-06-2007, 07:43 PM
that sounds really interesting, LazyGirl!

herbi
10-06-2007, 07:55 PM
start dozens of projects but appear not to finish any of them...

:uhoh: gee, that... doesn't... sound like anyone around here...

* plans to check book out from library * ;)

diffuse
10-06-2007, 08:19 PM
oh! that barbara sher book sounds similar to the renaissance soul: life design for people w/too many passions to pick just one, which i love! (altho' *cough* i haven't made my way through all the exercises yet; still, it feels like a relief to read the book & not feel like a loser for being, er, unfocused)

Miso Vegan
10-06-2007, 10:55 PM
Yep, that describes me, too. I don't have a problem with being this way, but I do recognize our society isn't really set up for our type. I used to tell my mom she made me too well rounded.

I might check out the book. Thanks, LazyGirl! (Will you soon be changing your user title from Slacker to Scanner?)

veganshawn
10-06-2007, 11:32 PM
Zen and the art of Motorcycle maintenance

LazyGirl
10-07-2007, 09:46 AM
(Will you soon be changing your user title from Slacker to Scanner?)

:laugh: No, I'm still good at doing nothing in particular. ;)

VegeTexan
10-21-2007, 09:15 AM
Just finished Practical Demonkeeping by Christopher Moore. Fun and terror. :skull:
and just started another book by Moore, Island of the Sequined Love Nun.

Thanks, Gladcow, for turning me on to Moore.

Flower
10-21-2007, 09:28 AM
The Mist by Stephen King.

Kat
10-21-2007, 09:49 AM
I'm about 2/3 of the way through reading Lesbian Nuns; Breaking Silence, by Rosemary Curb and Nancy Manahan.

It's a collection of interviews, letters and short articles written by women who are/were nuns and lesbians. Some of them have left the convent, some remain, some are still celibate, others aren't, and sometimes their stories are really surprising!

I really liked one story where two nuns left together and bought a house, but they remained religious and found a parish where the priest would still give them communion. He performed their committment ceremony, and baptised the child they conceived through artificial insemination. I love a happy ending :D

gladcow
10-21-2007, 01:50 PM
Just finished Practical Demonkeeping by Christopher Moore. Fun and terror. :skull:
and just started another book by Moore, Island of the Sequined Love Nun.

Thanks, Gladcow, for turning me on to Moore.
oh, I'm so glad you're enjoying his work :)

VegeTexan
10-21-2007, 02:37 PM
oh, I'm so glad you're enjoying his work :)

I am.
Last night I needed Moore, so I went to the bookstore and got "Island of... the nun" and "Coyote Blue." So that I won't run out soon, I just went to Amazon and ordered "You Suck" and "The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove."
:)

gladcow
10-23-2007, 07:14 PM
I am.
Last night I needed Moore, so I went to the bookstore and got "Island of... the nun" and "Coyote Blue." So that I won't run out soon, I just went to Amazon and ordered "You Suck" and "The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove."
:)
My husband loves Moore, so we've got them all, but I haven't read any lately. I'll get to them eventually.

Currently, I'm almost done with In My Blood (! it only took me months...) and have started Alternative Vegan by Dino Sarma. Initially, the font size/layout in general turned me off, but the intro and cooking info is very inspiring. I'll get around to some recipes soon.

Dugan
10-23-2007, 08:57 PM
Moore sounds interesting, ordered one through library tonight. Just started Stephen Baxter's Evolution (good so far), just finished CJ Box's Free Fire (warning: features hunting scenes) (VegeTexan - this series features a NP ranger as the main character) and Orson Scott Card's Enchanted, among others. Oh yeah, and gotta start The China Study received with my last library visit. Thanks for all the good book tips!

lizzapearl
10-24-2007, 10:00 AM
I just finished Sunshine by Robin McKinley (whom I adore). Wow. I don't get into vampires, but ... yeee! Tons of fun.

stegan
10-31-2007, 12:44 PM
I just finished The Handmaid's Tale- I hesitate to say that I enjoyed it, only because it's hard to describe a book that so accurately paints a picture of the terrifying type of society that we're headed towards as "enjoyable". I found myself with chills while reading it more often than I care to remember. Excellent, excellent stuff.

MissLovely
10-31-2007, 12:50 PM
PMA (http://www.amazon.com/Success-Through-Positive-Mental-Attitude/dp/0671743228), baby.

quagga
10-31-2007, 12:54 PM
I just finished Sunshine by Robin McKinley (whom I adore). Wow. I don't get into vampires, but ... yeee! Tons of fun.

When I was little, I wrote a fan letter to Robin McKinley after I read her book Beauty. And she wrote back! I still have the letter somewhere.

I'll have to look for this book at the library. Thanks!

nauthiz
10-31-2007, 01:00 PM
I just finished The Handmaid's Tale- I hesitate to say that I enjoyed it, only because it's hard to describe a book that so accurately paints a picture of the terrifying type of society that we're headed towards as "enjoyable". I found myself with chills while reading it more often than I care to remember. Excellent, excellent stuff.
:yes:

veganshawn
10-31-2007, 01:49 PM
Just read "The Iron Heel" by Jack London, amazing and scary, highly recomend it for those who liked 1984, Brave New World etc...

Halfway done with Ask the Dust - John Frante, intresting reading about a struggling writer in LA after the great depression.

kikkert
11-03-2007, 02:08 PM
My sweetie just finds the best books. I recently read a couple he picked up:

The Maytrees by Annie Dillard - so beautiful and soothing, simple and complex, full of mental imagery. The kind of book that lets your mind lose itself into the story as you are reading it, then snaps you back without warning. Very thoughtful. Very profound.

Rascal: A Memoir of a Better Era by Sterling North - published in 1963, took place in 1918. Loving simple life and nature and of course animals the way that I do, I loved the innocence right before realities of adulthood, sweetness, and down to earth quality of that period of his life and his adopted raccoon. Suitable reading for kids or adults.

veganshawn
11-03-2007, 08:18 PM
Imperial ambitions : conversations on the post-9/11 world- Noam Chomsky talking with David Bar.

QuietOne
11-03-2007, 10:29 PM
Diet for a Dead Planet by Christopher Cook.

LuC
11-04-2007, 08:08 AM
The Fast Food Craze: Wreaking Havoc on Our Bodies and Our Animals by Tina Volpe (:umm: I am wrong in thinking this book was written by CanyonPub.) I won this book in a raffle this weekend at an ARK fundraiser and I can't wait to read it.

VegeTexan
11-04-2007, 08:13 AM
LuC, what do you mean by "I am wrong in thinking..." ?

Apple
11-04-2007, 08:13 AM
Sense and Sensibility! I lurv Jane Austen. I've read Pride and Prejudice literally 7 times and now it's time to move to the next one. I keep starting to read other JA novels and then remember something funny in P&P so I go back and read it again!! But I won't get distracted this time!

LuC
11-04-2007, 08:31 AM
LuC, what do you mean by "I am wrong in thinking..." ?

I was asking if Tina was CanyonPub and if I would have checked some of her posts I would have realized that it is indeed her. :rolleyes: :p

michiganveganchick
11-06-2007, 11:54 AM
The Almost Moon by Alice Sebold.

I was super excited about reading it because I liked both her earlier books a lot. I'm really having trouble getting into this one, and then I listened to a New Yorker book reviewer say it was like reading a myspace page, :laugh: so that hasn't helped motivate me to keep on truckin'. I'm going to finish it dammit, because I paid hardcover price for it!!! :p

anya the vegan
11-06-2007, 12:59 PM
Stories Rabbits Tell: A Natural and Cultural History of a Misunderstood Creature

Very informative read thus far.

VegeTexan
11-07-2007, 03:49 PM
I liked that book, anya. The author, Margo DeMello has a new book out with coauthor Erin Williams, Why Animals Matter. They are both coming here to speak at my veg society in Feb.

I just finished Lauren's Story, An American Dog in Paris by Kay Pfaltz.
A very moving true story of a woman's love for a rescued beagle. Her love for the dog eventually turned her into a vegetarian and an animal advocate.
Kay will be a guest on my radio show in early December.
Find out more about the book here... http://www.kaypfaltz.com/

QuietOne
11-07-2007, 07:53 PM
Just read "The Iron Heel" by Jack London, amazing and scary, highly recomend it for those who liked 1984, Brave New World etc...

Halfway done with Ask the Dust - John Frante, intresting reading about a struggling writer in LA after the great depression.

I absolutely loved 1984 and Brave New World!! I just put The Iron Heel on reserve from my local library. Thanks Veganshawn for the recommendation.

Chijou_no_seiza
11-07-2007, 08:38 PM
I'm reading the Golden Compass, because I never read it when it came out, and wanted to read it before the movie comes in December.

So far, (100 pages or so) I enjoy the 5th grade reading level book much, much more than my college textbooks. Go figure. :silly:

anya the vegan
11-07-2007, 09:30 PM
VegeTexan, Lauren's Story sounds like something I would like...*adds to ever-growing list of 'must read'*

Chijou - I have read a little about the Golden Compass. Actually, someone emailed me about the "dangers of the Golden Compass" and how we MUST shield our children from the athiest slant of the book/movie. Clearly, the sender of the email did not realise I am in fact athiest :umm: So, after this little incident, I am intrigued. I have read the Chronicles of Narnia as a kid and the Golden Compass has been labeled as a "darker" Narnia. Are you coming away with that impression Chijou?

grog
11-07-2007, 09:38 PM
you should read. its excellent.

mamaquilla
11-07-2007, 11:16 PM
Okay, so know I have told Jane that Quagga, Chijou(grog's girlfriend), Grog and our friend Mona have ALL highly recommended reading The Golden Compass, instead of being "OK, lets go get it Mom!" shes all "I dont want to read it till next term so I can get points for it.:cool: "

:laugh:
Thanks ya all for giving me more persuasive power :happy:

quagga
11-08-2007, 12:07 AM
You can take my set home with you for Jane. It will be the second time a young person has read them....and loved them. *crosses fingers*

BTW, I'm of the opinion that she should read the book before the movie comes out. Forget the points.

Chijou_no_seiza
11-08-2007, 02:12 AM
BTW, I'm of the opinion that she should read the book before the movie comes out. Forget the points.

Word. That's why I'm reading it ASAP :cool:

It's so addicting. I just got it yesterday and keep thinking "just one more chapter", but THEN I get the last page and wholy cow I HAVE to start the next chapter now because of the plot twist or change.

mamaquilla
11-08-2007, 11:19 AM
grrrrrrrrrrr...I tried pointing out that it would be good to read it BEFORE the movie and still a no go :rolleyes:

Milkweed
11-08-2007, 11:44 AM
I read the The Golden Compass and the other two books in the trilogy years ago, despite the fact that the genre isn't really up my ally, and loved them all. Darker than Narnia, but I think they're a lot better - there's definitely no irritating not-so-subtle parallels to Christianity.

Atwood and/or poetry fans - has anyone read her poetry? She's a brilliant novelist, obviously, but her poetry is incredible as well.

LazyGirl
11-08-2007, 02:32 PM
I just finished The Handmaid's Tale- I hesitate to say that I enjoyed it, only because it's hard to describe a book that so accurately paints a picture of the terrifying type of society that we're headed towards as "enjoyable". I found myself with chills while reading it more often than I care to remember. Excellent, excellent stuff.

Margaret Atwood is one of my favorite authors. The woman knows her craft and has a razor sharp mind. For more terrifying visions of future dystopia (one that, according to her, will be the natural result if current trends, social values, etc. are continued into the future unchanged), read Oryx & Crake. I was disturbed, intrigued, fascinated, and inspired for weeks after I finished it.

As for me, I've been re-reading all of Anne Rice's vampire chronicles at an obscene pace. I'm on Blood and Gold now. It only serves as a reminder to me of how much I dislike Marius de Romanus.

ETA: Milkweed: I have read only a little of Atwood's poetry. I love all of her work, but I'm not too into poetry. :)

Flo
11-08-2007, 03:22 PM
I am in between a few books like I always do...
Dharma Bum -Kerouac
Yoga Gems
The Tree of Yoga BKS Iyengar

Emiloid
11-08-2007, 07:38 PM
I'm reading The Tale of Despereaux which is GREAT so far! I'm going to read it to my class soon. :thumbsup:

In school I'm reading Sideways Stories From Wayside School to my class. It's by Louis Sachar, who also wrote Holes, and it's reallllly funny.

I've also recently read Sadoko and the Thousand Cranes (to myself), Bunnicula (out loud to my class), and Charlotte's Web (also out loud to the class). I had to get my aide to read the end of that one because I was on the verge of tears. My goodness am I a sap! :rolleyes: I also cried at the end of Sadako, in case you're wondering. *sigh*

Flower
11-08-2007, 07:53 PM
I just finished The Quickie last week and am working my way through The 6th Target, both by James Patterson.

Miso Vegan
11-09-2007, 12:50 AM
Emiloid, when Miso Lite was younger, and we lived in FL (hot), and I didn't have to work, we were both able to indulge our innate night owl. We would meet up with other moms and toddlers at Barnes & Noble or Books-a-Million, where there was air conditioning and a Thomas train set, and the stores were open late ('til 11pm and midnite, respectively).

So, while my son and his friends played with trains, I would half-watch them and half-read whatever was nearby. I read Despereaux over the course of a couple of visits. I really enjoyed it - I planned to read the second but by then, our bookstore habit changed. I think Miso Lite is of an age to enjoy it, now, so thank you for the reminder!

Emiloid
11-09-2007, 03:29 PM
Yay!!! I only got to read two chapters last night (and they're short), so I feel Despereaux-deprived.

Shion
11-10-2007, 04:37 PM
I finished reading Foundation by: Isaac Asimov. I like two-thirds of the book. The ending where the planet-to-planet salesman saves the foundation made me want to gag. Otherwise it was decent.

veganshawn
11-10-2007, 07:04 PM
1984 - George Orwell

Chijou_no_seiza
11-12-2007, 08:17 PM
I finished the Golden Compass and the Subtle Knife. Both excellent.

I'm about 50 pages into the Amber spyglass, but probably won't finish for a week since Midterms and things are coming up and I won't have too much free time :mad:.

Now, I'm not looking forward to the movie because the book was phenomenal. Hah!

stegan
11-14-2007, 12:53 PM
I'm on to another travelogue- Bill Bryson, "A Walk In The Woods". It's a fun, easy read that's making me feel a little less claustrophobic about my physical surroundings, plus it'll keep me occupied on the plane this weekend.

MissLovely
11-14-2007, 01:00 PM
1984 - George Orwell

:uhoh:

Oatmeal Girl
11-14-2007, 07:55 PM
I'm reading Eat, Pray, Love. It's amazing.

Much more exciting news: my MOM is reading Diet for a New America! Yay! I'm so excited! I've been trying to get her to read it for years!

:banana: :banana: :banana:

mamaquilla
11-14-2007, 10:48 PM
I LOVED both those books Oatmeal Girl :silly:

veganshawn
11-14-2007, 11:54 PM
:uhoh:

Preparing for life under Hilary :)

bluedawg
11-20-2007, 01:50 PM
i've had four books open (yikes) for the longest time, but i'm happy to report that i finished one of them over the weekend! woo hoo!

i finished skinny bitch, which was entertaining, and i can see why it has helped some people make the switch to veganism. it's very no-nonsense, down-to-earth, and all that, but it also has facts and figures so it doesn't seem like they're just making crap up. also regarding tone: i was sometimes shocked, sometimes amused at the level of profanity throughout.

over the weekend i also made some good progress in your child or the dog? introduction to animal rights.

gladcow
11-20-2007, 02:31 PM
I finished In My Blood finally. It was good, but it's very long and towards the end I got a bit de-motivated. A very interesting look at familial mental disorders, tho.

Over my weekend away I started and finished Partly Cloudy Patriot by Sarah Vowell. :heart:

quagga
11-20-2007, 03:52 PM
Over my weekend away I started and finished Partly Cloudy Patriot by Sarah Vowell. :heart:

I didn't even see you reading anything! I :heart: Sarah Vowell.

gladcow
11-20-2007, 03:57 PM
I didn't even see you reading anything! I :heart: Sarah Vowell.
I read in the airports and before bed. I R IN UR AIRBED READINZ GUD BOOKZ

mamaquilla
11-20-2007, 03:59 PM
Bwah!

watchthesky
11-20-2007, 04:43 PM
I'm reading At First Sight by Nicholas Sparks right now on my own time because he's supposedly the best author of love stories ever, but I really can't get into it. :-/ And I'm reading The Great Gatsby for Honors English 3. F. Scott Fitzgerald can suck it as far as I'm concerned. Even though my teacher swears up and down that it will get better.

grog
11-20-2007, 04:49 PM
gatsby is awesome. you just gotta except the writing style and roaring twenties type of feel.

Chijou_no_seiza
11-20-2007, 08:55 PM
no watchthesky you are right The Great Gatsby sucks and it won't get better. At least it's short, sorry!

Flower
11-20-2007, 09:09 PM
Blaze by Richard Bachman (aka Stephen King). I'm loving it so far.

Jose R
12-05-2007, 11:20 AM
Introduction to Animal Rights. Your Child or the Dog? (second time) by Gary L. Francione. Good book, not his best though.

lenni
12-05-2007, 12:04 PM
Currently: Skipping Towards Gomorrah by Dan Savage (I love Dan Savage!)
and (for probably the 8th time) Everything is Illuminated by Jonathan Safran Foer

I cannot reccommend Everything is Illuminated enough--it is absolutely beautiful and inspired...just read it, ok?

Next up: "The Communist Manifesto" (I had some fun at Half-Priced Books the other day).

And a shout-out to those of you mentioning Orwell---he is hands-down my favorite author (especially 1984, Animal Farm, Down and Out in Paris and London, and Keep the Aspidistra Flying). I have "1984" tattooed on my right wrist and "2 + 2 = 4" tattooed on my neck. I love George Orwell!!!

lenni
12-05-2007, 12:07 PM
Emiloid!!!!!

Bunnicula is awesome!!!!

QuietOne
12-05-2007, 09:21 PM
I'm halfway through Jack London's "The Iron Heel". This book is scary--even though it was written in 1907, so much of it still holds true to this day.

bluedawg
12-05-2007, 09:25 PM
I have "1984" tattooed on my right wrist and "2 + 2 = 4" tattooed on my neck.
and it's kewl-lookin' :yes:

Emiloid
12-05-2007, 09:57 PM
OK, I read The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales the other night. It was short and sweet, and really funny.

Yay, book orders!

walrus
12-05-2007, 10:03 PM
i am reading all of emiloid's posts tonight! she is on a roll! wheeeee!

stegan
12-06-2007, 12:03 PM
I just started reading Neither Here Nor There by Bill Bryson. I was reading the other book of his on a lark for fun, but I've discovered that I absolutely love his writing style, so I immediately dove for this one.

Funny story- when we were back in PA for thanksgiving, we had a gathering of friends, and four of us were reading Bill Bryson books at the same time. Guess it's a travel/escapist time of year. :)

jamiexvx
12-06-2007, 12:10 PM
"The Westing Game" by Ellen Raskin. It's a kid's book but I've always loved it. :)

mishka
12-06-2007, 12:16 PM
Not reading it yet, but I just bought The China Study. I'll probably start it over the holidays.

gladcow
12-06-2007, 01:38 PM
OK, I read The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales the other night. It was short and sweet, and really funny.

Yay, book orders!
I :heart: that book. Have you read The Very Persistant Gappers of Frip? It has the same illustrator as Stinky Cheese Man.

I'm not reading any books right now. :(

veganshawn
12-06-2007, 03:13 PM
I'm halfway through Jack London's "The Iron Heel". This book is scary--even though it was written in 1907, so much of it still holds true to this day.

I just read that book as well. Really good read and very scary, more so then 1984 IMO because it seems like it could happen and is happening today, where 1984 though scary is fiction enough that it seems less plausable.

nauthiz
12-06-2007, 03:53 PM
"The Westing Game" by Ellen Raskin. It's a kid's book but I've always loved it. :)
I love that book, too.

JasperKat
12-08-2007, 02:36 PM
I just started reading Neither Here Nor There by Bill Bryson. I was reading the other book of his on a lark for fun, but I've discovered that I absolutely love his writing style, so I immediately dove for this one.

Funny story- when we were back in PA for thanksgiving, we had a gathering of friends, and four of us were reading Bill Bryson books at the same time. Guess it's a travel/escapist time of year. :)

Have you read A Short History of Nearly Everything? I loved it.

I'm on an HG Wells kick right now. I finished Island of Dr Moreau (so creepy and sad) and started the Invisible Man (also sad, but with some funny moments). His writing style really works your imagination.

-JK

walrus
12-08-2007, 04:16 PM
i just finished Go Ask Alice. interesting read. according to wiki (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Go_Ask_Alice), it isn't entirely true.

Flower
12-08-2007, 04:19 PM
i just finished Go Ask Alice. interesting read. according to wiki (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Go_Ask_Alice), it isn't entirely true.

I love that book! Maybe because it reflects so much on my past, but I found it very moving. I may have to read it again sometime.

walrus
12-08-2007, 04:21 PM
I love that book! Maybe because it reflects so much on my past, but I found it very moving. I may have to read it again sometime.
yeah, i really liked it. i'm glad it was mostly factual, anyway.

Shion
12-17-2007, 02:26 AM
I am almost done with Wicca for One and I am half way through listening to The Golden Compass.

Foreverbright
12-17-2007, 05:32 AM
'The Wanting Seed.' by Anthony Burgess. It's a favorite:) :)

veganshawn
12-17-2007, 09:44 AM
Paw prints of history (at least I think that is the name off the top of my head) it is a book about famous people's dogs effects on their lives or the lives of others.

Flower
12-17-2007, 05:38 PM
I just finished-

Dark of the Moon by John Sandford

and

I Am Legend by Richard Matheson

KaliMama
12-17-2007, 09:32 PM
Just finished "The Yiddish Policemen's Union" by Michael Chabon. Speculative fiction in which the second world war turned out differently and featuring displaced Jews in Sitka, Alaska. Wonderful! Not funny all the time, but when it is, :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

Now I am halfway through "Someone Comes to Town, Someone Leaves Town" by Cory Doctorow. I love it. It's a weird fairy tale of monsters, the internets, free as in speech and dumpster diving anarchists.

"Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close" by Jonathan Foers is the best book that I read this year. I'd even put it on a short list of the best books I've read, ever. You should read it, too. ;)

vegankitty
12-18-2007, 08:45 AM
I am on a Chuck Palahniuk kick.I read Haunted , Stranger than Fiction and Choke.Now I am reading Lullaby.I love Chuck!

I also read The List by Steve Martini.I had finished my current book and had nothing to read and found a copy.It was totally predictable but I still felt compelled to finish it.

Dugan
12-18-2007, 01:21 PM
Dark of the Moon by John Sandford
A new Sandford! Must put on library want list...

Milkweed
12-18-2007, 01:44 PM
I just finished the whole His Dark Materials Trilogy. *sigh*. So good. Far better than I remembered, and I remember loving it. Now I'm trying to get back into "Listening to Prozac" which is interesting, but, well...it's about the history, theories, and biology behind psychoactive drugs. And as entertaining as I find psychopharmacology, it just sort of lacks the draw of HDM's epic fantasy.

Flower
12-18-2007, 03:54 PM
I am on a Chuck Palahniuk kick.I read Haunted , Stranger than Fiction and Choke.Now I am reading Lullaby.I love Chuck!

I adore him, too. He's coming out with a new book earlier next year. Yay!

Flower
12-18-2007, 04:02 PM
A new Sandford! Must put on library want list...

It was a pretty decent read. :)

seitanicvegan
12-28-2007, 06:12 PM
I'm in the middle of Vegan Freak: Being Vegan in a Non-Vegan World. So far, I'm not reading a lot of new information ... maybe some new numbers/statistics and a few new responses to offer non-vegans. For the most part, this book is reaffirming the reasons that I decided to become vegan (and there is a lot of wonderful anti-mainstream sarcasm that keeps me smiling). When I started this book, I didn't expect this feeling of renewal, but it's very powerful especially when I come across statements like this:

"[O]ur very diet is a form of living protest we enact at every meal. Veganism is our lived expression of our own ethics; it is basic compassion" (58).

That statement jumped out at me and hit me hard, right in the gut. :p But in a good way. :D

gladcow
12-28-2007, 06:15 PM
I'm reading Born Standing Up by Steve Martin. I'm reading it as slowly as possible so that it will last longer :happy:

VegeTexan
12-28-2007, 06:21 PM
The Darkest Evening of the Year by Dean Koontz. Dog rescue is an important part of the book. Golden Retrievers.

seitanicvegan
12-28-2007, 07:12 PM
The Darkest Evening of the Year by Dean Koontz. Dog rescue is an important part of the book. Golden Retrievers.
I saw this at Barnes & Noble, and I thought (and thought) about picking it up. Would you recommend it? Thoughts? (Yours, not mine. ;) )

Flower
12-28-2007, 07:24 PM
That one is on my wish list. :)

Right now I'm reading The Missing by Sarah Langan. I love it.

veganshawn
12-28-2007, 07:38 PM
I'm in the middle of Vegan Freak: Being Vegan in a Non-Vegan World. So far, I'm not reading a lot of new information ... maybe some new numbers/statistics and a few new responses to offer non-vegans. For the most part, this book is reaffirming the reasons that I decided to become vegan (and there is a lot of wonderful anti-mainstream sarcasm that keeps me smiling). When I started this book, I didn't expect this feeling of renewal, but it's very powerful especially when I come across statements like this:

"[O]ur very diet is a form of living protest we enact at every meal. Veganism is our lived expression of our own ethics; it is basic compassion" (58).

That statement jumped out at me and hit me hard, right in the gut. :p But in a good way. :D

I loved that book when I read it, I was so dissapointed how my interactions with the forum turned out but o well the book itself is good.

veganshawn
12-28-2007, 07:40 PM
Just finished: Palenstine Freedom not Aparthied by Jimmy Carter- Really powerful book, it makes you so angry at how religion/racism has made this area and the world so unstable.

Now reading God isn't Great "How religion poisons everything - (authors name escapes me) - It is really good so far and highly recomend it for those who don't believe or don't care to believe in religion.

seitanicvegan
12-28-2007, 07:54 PM
I loved that book when I read it, I was so dissapointed how my interactions with the forum turned out but o well the book itself is good.
I'm reading this book in front of my parents (as they both watch mindless TV shows). Whenever I grin from something in the book, they give me funny looks. But they've seen the title, and I think they're afraid to ask me any questions. :D

quagga
12-28-2007, 08:51 PM
The Darkest Evening of the Year by Dean Koontz. Dog rescue is an important part of the book. Golden Retrievers.

Mr Q is a big Dean R Koontz fan! He started reading this a few weeks ago and is finding it slow going in terms of plot, character, and writing. The dogs in Koontz' other books are much better, according to Mr Q.

Dean Koontz has done some short podcasts about writing, dogs, and books that are a lot of fun. He really loves dogs. He explains in one podcast that his beloved dog, Trixie, passed away just before or just after he started writing this book.

VegeTexan
12-28-2007, 09:03 PM
I saw this at Barnes & Noble, and I thought (and thought) about picking it up. Would you recommend it? Thoughts? (Yours, not mine. ;) )

and



Mr Q is a big Dean R Koontz fan! He started reading this a few weeks ago and is finding it slow going in terms of plot, character, and writing. The dogs in Koontz' other books are much better, according to Mr Q.

Dean Koontz has done some short podcasts about writing, dogs, and books that are a lot of fun. He really loves dogs. He explains in one podcast that his beloved dog, Trixie, passed away just before or just after he started writing this book.

I am a huge Koontz fan, I think I have read almost all of his work.

I remember reading that Trixie passed, I felt sad for Dean. BTW, Trixie and Dean wrote a couple of books together, I haven't read them yet, but perhaps I will get around to it when Dean stops writing novels faster than I can read them.

I don't remember any other of his books being so hugely about dogs, except Watchers, which I always say was my fav of his. A super intellegent dog as the main character.

I have to say...I am a cat guy, but Watchers made me cry. It didn't make me want to go out and adopt a dog tho.

I am 2/3 through Darkest Evening and enjoying it very much so far.
There are so many parallels between the characters and a "lost and found" theme for both humans and dogs.

So yes, if you don't mind a few cold-blooded murders and want a good suspense novel with dogs....this is one to read.

SyrLinus
12-28-2007, 09:09 PM
Right now, I'm reading Heft on Wheels and recently finished Turtledove's End of the Beginning (alternative history fiction book). I'm hoping to start Isaac Asimov's Guide to the Bible soon along with The Great American Detox. :D

vegankitty
12-28-2007, 09:21 PM
I am reading the Dark Materials but it is so bulky it is my bedtime book until work slows down.I'm also reading On the Road which I tried reading before in my teens and hated but am enjoying now.Also The Uplift War by David Brin-sci-fi about different sentient species and aliens.I have a habit of leaving books behind and starting new ones.:rolleyes:

VegeTexan
12-28-2007, 09:21 PM
Lord, I've always loved Asimov, his fiction and even more so his non-fiction, but I don't think I have read his Guide to the Bible. I need to put that on my list, thanks SyrLinus.

Dugan
12-29-2007, 08:21 PM
Dark of the Moon by John Sandford
Decent indeed!

VegeTexan
12-29-2007, 08:41 PM
Speaking of dog related books (2/3 of the way into Darkest Evening of the Year by Koontz) let me once again recommend Lauren's Story by Kay Pfaltz.
http://www.kaypfaltz.com/ Kay was a recent guest on my radio show. Her love of a rescued beagle eventually led to her vegetarianism. All the profits from her book go to animal rescue organizations.
Click my signature link below to go to that show.

I'm a cat guy. Dogs make me a bit uncomfortable. All that jumping and drolling.
But Watchers by Koontz is one of my favorite books.

Flower
12-29-2007, 09:01 PM
Decent indeed!

:D ;)

veganshawn
12-30-2007, 01:10 AM
Tried reading Koontz years ago (during high school) and he bored me to tears (the book was something about lightning). I should give him a second chance, I was reading a lot of Clive Barker and Stephen King at the time, so maybe they where just much better?

JasperKat
12-30-2007, 09:38 AM
Kootz is okay, but after awhile all of his stuff starts to seem like the same thing over and over. I used to have tons of his books (ex boyfriend's mom bought me them constantly) and I pared it down to 2 or 3. Mr. Murder, Dragon Tears and maybe one more that I can't remember. I would check them out of the library if I wanted something quick to read on a plane or at the beach, can't see myself spending money on another one of his books.

Mr Kat bought me a Sony Reader for Xmas :banana: and loaded it up with lots of books. I'm in the middle of HG Well's Time Traveler, but next on the list is Mad Cowboy.

-JK

veganshawn
12-30-2007, 10:18 AM
Jasperkat- Lucky you, those readers look cool!

Dugan
12-30-2007, 01:02 PM
Koontz is okay, but after awhile all of his stuff starts to seem like the same thing over and over.
For me too. I liked Watchers but quit reading him not long after that. I listened to one in the past year - something-moon? It was okay, but I probably would not have read it.

Flower
12-30-2007, 02:16 PM
HG Well's Time Traveler

Such a good book!

I like Koontz, but not as much as other authors. I don't think I could read a lot of his books in a row. Every once in a while isn't bad, though. They're such fast reads, too, so that probably helps.

mamaquilla
12-30-2007, 03:12 PM
I borrowed
Yoga Anatomy by Leslie Kaminoff
from the library, it was forgotten till just yesterday cuz I had to return it. :rolleyes:
REALLY amazing book, great pic's, information, all you yoga lovers, this would be a book you should own!

I want to own it now :laugh:

SyrLinus
12-30-2007, 03:15 PM
I'm reading Making A Killing by Bob Torres. I finished Heft on Wheels recently. Very good book. :)

mishka
12-30-2007, 04:00 PM
I'm reading a silly little mystery, called Santa Cruise (http://www.amazon.ca/Santa-Cruise-Holiday-Mystery-Sea/dp/141653802X), that was given to me as an Xmas gift. It's totally not my style, but it helped kill time on the subway and the 2 hours I had to wait to see a walk-in doctor.

Dugan
12-30-2007, 05:02 PM
Sometimes fluffy little books are exactly what the doctor ordered!

Flower
01-01-2008, 02:51 PM
I'm currently reading Blood Red by James Moore and The Thrive Diet by Brendan Brazier. Loving both of them so far!

quagga
01-01-2008, 04:27 PM
I borrowed
Yoga Anatomy by Leslie Kaminoff
from the library, it was forgotten till just yesterday cuz I had to return it.

I have this book! I agree, it's excellent.

JasperKat
01-02-2008, 10:45 AM
Jasperkat- Lucky you, those readers look cool!

It's pretty sweet. The only drawback is that I wouldn't be comfortable taking it to the beach or camping. Well, maybe camping but put it in the car overnight so it doesn't get damp. I really love reading and owning books, but I'm running out of room (three overfilled bookshelves) so this is a great solution.

-JK

vegankitty
01-03-2008, 11:35 AM
My boyfriend was looking at one of those readers for me.We have limited space and he doesn't see why I need so much shelf space for books.Can you buy books for it cheap?Is there a way to trade titles?I buy most of my books second hand.

I'm reading Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk and I also got his new one-Rant -in hardcover.I got a Barnes and Noble gift card and an AMEX card and went bookshopping!

sitting_vegan
01-03-2008, 08:13 PM
I <heart> the library!

JasperKat
01-04-2008, 11:12 AM
My boyfriend was looking at one of those readers for me.We have limited space and he doesn't see why I need so much shelf space for books.Can you buy books for it cheap?Is there a way to trade titles?I buy most of my books second hand.

Mine came with 100 free downloads of "classics" and a $50 credit towards new books. The most expensive title I saw was $13, so cheaper than a new hardcover. I don't know if you can trade, haven't looked into that.

-JK

vegankitty
01-04-2008, 10:26 PM
$13 is still a lot-I buy a lot of stuff at thrift stores and on the street for a dollar.

Finished Fight Club and am now reading Rant-a hardcover for $24.95 but I bought with a gift card so it feels free.And I bought a book to send to my friend in jail-he's dying for books-he got caught smoking pot and is in the "box" for six months s has a lot of time on his hands.

tipsyvegan
01-04-2008, 10:33 PM
reading: atonement by ian mcewan (wich is a horribly silly name if you ask me! :p)

i always need to read books before i can see the movies that correspond... im not sure why. i just like it that way!

also: im not much of a sappy-sapish type... but something about old tyme set love stories gets me...:confused:

bluedawg
01-04-2008, 10:59 PM
tonight i finished reading committed: a rabble-rouser's memoir by dan mathews (vice president of PeTA). i really liked it. entertaining, engaging, with lots of fun details and background.

vegankitty
01-04-2008, 11:17 PM
Flower, Rant is the new Chuck , right?You want it when I'm done?I'm out of shelf space and need to clear room.And I'd like it to go to someone who'd appreciate it.

JasperKat
01-07-2008, 10:59 AM
tonight i finished reading committed: a rabble-rouser's memoir by dan mathews (vice president of PeTA). i really liked it. entertaining, engaging, with lots of fun details and background.

That's next on my list! I also have Mad Cowboy waiting and long-overdue.

-JK

Flower
01-07-2008, 07:38 PM
Flower, Rant is the new Chuck , right?You want it when I'm done?I'm out of shelf space and need to clear room.And I'd like it to go to someone who'd appreciate it.

Yes, it is, but I have already read it. :) Thanks so much for the offer, though!

On May 20 he's got a new one coming out called Snuff. I can't wait!

I read Skinny Bitch this weekend. Second time I read it (first time was when it first came out). I love this book!

Foxy
01-07-2008, 10:55 PM
Making a Killing: The Political Economy of Animal Rights by Bob Torres. So far, so good. Can't put it down. It's fabulous.

vegankitty
01-07-2008, 11:34 PM
Making a Killing: The Political Economy of Animal Rights by Bob Torres. So far, so good. Can't put it down. It's fabulous.

I just got that!Can't wait to read.

mckennasmom
01-07-2008, 11:46 PM
Well...I read Fancy Nancy and the Posh Puppy to my kinders today (always looking for a good way to re-iterate adopting a shelter dog, or eating veggies/fruits, etc) but it was SO cute (she thinks she wants a Pappilon (sp) but ends up at the shelter with some breed that looks like a big poodle to me and she fancies her up and it's great)! Another great one for those w/kids is "Let's Get a Pup." My kinders want it over and over-great shelter message too!

I'm actually reading Eat, Pray, Love cause I'm a sucker for stuff on Oprah.

veganshawn
01-08-2008, 12:29 AM
Almost down with God Isn't Great- How religion poisons everything What an amazing and powerful book it is, should be required reading for every man woman and child in this country.

Next I think I will read either Animal Farm - Orwell (second time) or The big hunger : stories, 1932-1959 by John Fante. I also have The Case for impeachment, can't recall the authors name.

Choices choices.

anya the vegan
01-08-2008, 08:47 AM
veganshawn - i would have to agree with you on "God is Not Great".

i just finished "The Creation: An Appeal to Save Life on Earth" by E.O. Wilson. He is a biologist. The book is written in the form of a plea to a pastor (God-fearing people in general) and professes that we all need to be working together despite our religous affiliation (or lack thereof) to save Nature. it was a nice, easy read.

VegeTexan
01-08-2008, 01:26 PM
veganshawn - i would have to agree with you on "God is Not Great".



Depends on how you define God.

I'm reading The Real Forbidden Fruit, How Meat Destroys Paradise and How Veganism Can Get It Back by Jeff Popick.
http://therealforbiddenfruit.com/
Jeff will be the guest on my radio show next Sunday.

veganshawn
01-08-2008, 01:31 PM
Depends on how you define God.


That is what is amazing about the book is that he takes on that vary argument and shows how the very definition of God hold back humanity. I really recomend reading the book no matter what you set of beliefs are, I think everyone will get something good out of it.

VegeTexan
01-08-2008, 01:59 PM
That is what is amazing about the book is that he takes on that vary argument and shows how the very definition of God hold back humanity. I really recomend reading the book no matter what you set of beliefs are, I think everyone will get something good out of it.

Thanks, veganshawn. I think I will go with your recommendation and read the book, a friend of mine has a copy.

In advance of reading the book, I have to offer this.... my definition is that god is the universe, and that life, the universe and therefore god is in a process of evolution.
A definition like that doesn't hold us back, it encourages us to progress. (...compassion, love, veganism and beyond)

bumblebee
01-08-2008, 02:02 PM
Husband got god is not great for me, for xmas. I will probably start reading it tonight. :)

veganshawn
01-08-2008, 02:20 PM
Thanks, veganshawn. I think I will go with your recommendation and read the book, a friend of mine has a copy.

In advance of reading the book, I have to offer this.... my definition is that god is the universe, and that life, the universe and therefore god is in a process of evolution.
A definition like that doesn't hold us back, it encourages us to progress. (...compassion, love, veganism and beyond)

I think you will like it, esp what Einstien has to say about "god"

Milkweed
01-08-2008, 05:19 PM
For those of you who have read God is Not Great, how does it compare to the God Delusion?

I've been kind of annoyed with the recent books that attack religion, not because they don't have valid points, but because the authors act like they, or other atheists, have articulated the loop-holes for the first time. I am by no means a christian apologist, but I wish these authors would at least acknowledge that people within the christian tradition have been raising and addressing these issues for centuries. They make up the substance of true theological debate. I seem to remember (and I might be wrong here) either Dawkins or Harris raising up the problem of how to reconcile an omnipotent, omniscient, and benevolent God with the reality of evil in the world as if the field of theodicy had not existed since man created god in the first place.

Granted, the average believer does seem to be sort of unaware that these questions have been, and continue to be, debated within religion. They take whatever their particular church's decision was to be the truth. But these authors just prove that they are as ignorant about it as the people they are attacking. It just seems wrong to me that atheism, a point of view that is honored specifically for it's uncompromising search for truth, would fail to take into consideration the scholarly aspect of faith - theology. It seems like when they want a scientific opinion, they go to the greatest experts they can find in a particular field. (as they should.) but when they want a religious opinion, they take whatever they've heard on the street or in sunday school instead of going to the theologians.

Okay that was kind of a rant, but I am wondering if anyone else feels this way, or if it's just me cuz I'm an atheist who happens to have studied christian theology. I mean, I never found any answers that I felt were adequate, but there are a lot of highly intelligent theologians/philosophers who have delved deeply into these topics, and even though I don't ultimately agree, I would never write a book that's sole purpose is to debunk the faith they were working to defend without at least acknowledging their efforts.

Anyway God is Not Great sounds like it might be a little bit different, in that it appears to discuss the actual effects of religion instead of the intended theology...? Thoughts, anyone? Umm sorry if this should go in a different thread, but I'm still talking about books, so perhaps it's still relevant.

veganshawn
01-08-2008, 05:23 PM
Milkweed- From your rant I think you would enjoy the book, I have not read the other one you mention so I can not compare them. One thing that did stick out to me was when the author mentions that a lot of people over the years had to hide their thoughts or the ones who dared question the chuch where totured and their work destroyed, so a lot of the debate is lost because the church censored it.

Dugan
01-08-2008, 07:54 PM
Oh my goodness. Started listening to a new audiobook on the way home tonight. It's all the way out in the car and I'm far too lazy to go look up the author and title.

The first side of the first cassette absolutely *tortured* me with food descriptions all the way home. Fresh popcorn... the smell of cinnamon and chocolate in a simmering mole... the scent of fresh corn roasting with freshly juiced lime... (okay, I could do without the brisket). :drool:

JasperKat
01-09-2008, 10:44 AM
tonight i finished reading committed: a rabble-rouser's memoir by dan mathews (vice president of PeTA). i really liked it. entertaining, engaging, with lots of fun details and background.

I'm about halfway through. I really like it, he's a good writer and has a lot of funny stories. I do wish he went into a little more detail about certain things, but I suppose he has too much ground to cover to get too deep into one story.

-JK

veganshawn
01-10-2008, 11:02 PM
Just finished Animal Farm by Orwell, it was just as amazing the second time. It was the special edition that included his original appendix and a appendix for a Ukraine edition.

tipsyvegan
01-11-2008, 12:44 AM
just started the world without us - alan weisman

im already sucked in :drool: its fascinating!

Miso Vegan
01-11-2008, 01:46 AM
So, only a little over a year after gladcow sent it to me, I finished PopCo last night and LOVED IT!

Really nicely written, interesting, fascinating, and smart pro-vegan! Yay! I already know who I'm passing it along to.

Thanks, gladcow!!!

JasperKat
01-11-2008, 10:38 AM
I finished Committed (liked it alot!) and started The Secret Garden. Even though I'm the only person on earth who hasn't read it, I didn't really know what it was about when I started it and the foreward has what seems like a big spoiler in it. Grrr.

-JK

gladcow
01-11-2008, 11:03 AM
So, only a little over a year after gladcow sent it to me, I finished PopCo last night and LOVED IT!

Really nicely written, interesting, fascinating, and smart pro-vegan! Yay! I already know who I'm passing it along to.

Thanks, gladcow!!!
yay!

we need to start a vegan book sharing thread
:thinking:

Milkweed
01-11-2008, 11:04 AM
I would so be down with a vegan book sharing thread!

I just started Margaret Atwood's new book of poetry The Door. OMG. So. Beautiful.

Shion
01-18-2008, 03:20 AM
I have been in a book "lull" so to speak. I can't seem to get through the new Thomas Covenant novel, "Fatal Revenant." I liked all the other books, but Thomas Covenant is really annoying me.

So I have just read through The One-Minute Organizer Plain & Simple, Wicca for One, and I almost through re-readingThief of Lives.

anya the vegan
01-18-2008, 10:29 AM
I tried to read "Catch 22" because it is said to be one of the greatest novels ever...I forced myself thru 50 pages before throwing in the towel on that one. Couldn't get into it at all.

veganshawn
01-18-2008, 12:36 PM
Evasion - author unknown: It is punk rock version of On the Road, lots of freight riding, dumpster diving, travel around the country with no money, all the highlights lows and lots of fun. If you do a goggle search you can find it for free to print, then pass it on.

vegankitty
01-18-2008, 03:23 PM
Evasion - author unknown: It is punk rock version of On the Road, lots of freight riding, dumpster diving, travel around the country with no money, all the highlights lows and lots of fun. If you do a goggle search you can find it for free to print, then pass it on.

And if you are printerless?

KaliMama
01-18-2008, 05:01 PM
Or don't have goggles?

veganshawn
01-18-2008, 05:43 PM
And if you are printerless?

you can order it directly from crimetinc for 5 or 6 bucks post paid.

http://www.crimethinc.com/books/evasion.html

veganshawn
01-18-2008, 05:53 PM
Or don't have goggles?

I am sure you understood what I meant, GOOGLE!

KaliMama
01-18-2008, 11:23 PM
I am sure you understood what I meant, GOOGLE!

I'm sorry. I couldn't help it. I'm nothing but trouble, I tell you.

And stop calling me GOOGLE.

abbicus
01-19-2008, 12:52 AM
anya- oooh Catch-22! I just re-read it. I think its my favorite book. I think I relate to the helplessness in it. I think the style though is sort of like cilantro- you either like it or you don't.
Before that I read Atlas Shrugged. I thought it was worth reading but damn it was long...
I just finished galapagos by Vonnegut. Its very weird and out of order like his books are, but the main message is actually kind of interesting. If you can deal with Vonnegut or are a fan, it is a pretty quick read.

Now I'm reading a book about the emotional lives of animals. I forget the name (When elephants weep?). Also a book of essays by Tom Regan, and another animal rights book which was forgetable. I'm liking the first a lot because of the poignant anecdotes.

I'm working at a call center and have a lot of reading time, so that explains the long book list.

veganshawn
01-19-2008, 02:20 AM
I'm sorry. I couldn't help it. I'm nothing but trouble, I tell you.

And stop calling me GOOGLE.

Sorry I am a little sensitive

vegankitty
01-19-2008, 11:07 AM
I just finished Diary and Invisible Monsters by Chuck Pahlianuk. I am still reading His Dark Materials-the three-in -one volume is so big to carry around all day so its been taking me a long time to read it.

anya the vegan
01-19-2008, 12:26 PM
anya- oooh Catch-22! I just re-read it. I think its my favorite book. I think I relate to the helplessness in it. I think the style though is sort of like cilantro- you either like it or you don't.

:laugh:

(for the record, i love cilantro)

i bought the hubby stephen colbert's book "I am America (and so can you!)" for the holidays...i am going to start reading it today.

vegankitty
01-19-2008, 11:41 PM
:laugh:

(for the record, i love cilantro)

i bought the hubby stephen colbert's book "I am America (and so can you!)" for the holidays...i am going to start reading it today.

Did hubby get to read it yet?

anya the vegan
01-20-2008, 09:45 AM
ummm...no...is that bad of me? the book has been sitting on the shelf looking lonely for the past few weeks. it's begging to be read. i think he actually forgot he had it. i devour books while he kinda just nibbles here and there.

anyway, the book has def made me chuckle a lot so far. stephen colbert is such a sarcastic turd. i love it.

Miso Vegan
01-20-2008, 01:16 PM
I'm reading it right now! It's f*ing hilarious.

Milkweed
01-20-2008, 01:26 PM
I had a long drive home after christmas (8 hours) so i bought Colbert's book on CD and listened to it while I drove...so funny! I was giggling the whole way, other drivers started to look at me weird. :silly:

I just read Crimes Against Logic: Exposing the Bogus Arguments of Politicians, Priests, Journalists, and Other Serial Offenders by Jamie Whyte and it was so great - it was a pretty quick read, but very smart and witty.

I am just starting Doubt: A History by Jennifer Michael Hecht which is excellent so far. Interesting, and beautifully written.

purple dinosaur
01-24-2008, 11:17 PM
I'm currently reading A Confederacy of Dunces, by John Kennedy Toole. It's awesome, but it's taking me way longer than expected to read it! Probably because school is so darn busy.

At the end of my winter hols, I read The Story of B by Daniel Quinn, which was AWESOME! I totally recommend it. I haven't read the book that comes before it yet, called Ishmael, but if it's anything like his second book I will probably love it as well.

purple dinosaur
01-24-2008, 11:20 PM
I tried to read "Catch 22" because it is said to be one of the greatest novels ever...I forced myself thru 50 pages before throwing in the towel on that one. Couldn't get into it at all.

Also...Catch-22 is one of the greatest novels ever. Seriously. It took me a while to get into it too, but once you do, it is so worth it.

vegankitty
01-24-2008, 11:23 PM
I'm currently reading A Confederacy of Dunces, by John Kennedy Toole. It's awesome, but it's taking me way longer than expected to read it! Probably because school is so darn busy.

Good book!

I'm still reading His Dark Materials.If I'd realized how big it was i wouldn't have ordered the three-in-one.

purple dinosaur
01-24-2008, 11:29 PM
Don't get discouraged! His Dark Materials is fantastic. Especially The Golden Compass, which is one of my favourite books of all time.

Oh man...I love those books. I've read them more times than I can count.

Dugan
01-25-2008, 08:11 AM
I've read Confederacy of Dunces - years and years ago. I remember enjoying it.

I just finished listening to an excellent audiobook, Little Earthquakes by Jennifer Weiner. It's about a few women forging very close friendships after they meet in a prenatal yoga class and help each other with the perils of brand new motherhood. Even not being a mom, I laughed and almost cried at some of the descriptions - learning how to getting a baby to "latch on" for nursing, for instance - had me laughing on the highway! There are good times and bad as the women learn to cope with becoming mothers and as their husbands adjust to their changing roles, and perhaps the world's worst mother in law. As much as I enjoyed this, I imagine anyone who is a parent would be able to relate to it much more. The narrator was Johanna Parker. I think it would be just as good in print form.

bluemango
01-25-2008, 11:52 AM
I'm reading 4 books right now:

1. Special Topics in Calamity Physics, by Marisha Pessl. It sounded so promising; a story of a group of students whose mentor is murdered. It's told from the point of view of one of the students, and it incorporates science and philosophy into the story. I was very excited but just can't seem to get into it.

2. The Secret History, by Donna Tartt. This was really great. It was what inspired me to start Special Topics. It describes five students and an elderly mentor at a university studying ancient Greek. Some of the students murder one of the students in the group, in an effort to cover up a previous crime. The book starts with the murder and then backtracks in time and tells the story of how they got there. Really fascinating, and the author uses extensive knowledge of Greek, history, art, and literature, and all the characters are well-developed and complex.

3. Interpreter of Maladies, by Jhumpa Lahiri. This is a collection of short stories written by the author of The Namesake. I really enjoyed The Namesake, and I think I'm enjoying this even more! I like that you can read the stories one at a time, and they are all so colorfully written. I'd really recommend it.

4. I'm re-reading the last three Chronicles of Narnia. Just because I love them. I read them as a child with complete ignorance of the religious undertones, which is why I'm still able to enjoy them as an adult.

mamaquilla
01-25-2008, 03:00 PM
Im currently re-reading
Love Poems From God, Twelve Sacred Voices from East and West
by Daniel Ladinsky
he also translated The Gift, Hafiz peotry, I also own and love :)

Milkweed
01-25-2008, 05:57 PM
Oooh mamaq those both sound good

mamaquilla
01-25-2008, 05:58 PM
They are, they are, quick run to the library :silly:

Miso Vegan
01-25-2008, 10:15 PM
bluemango, I really loved The Secret History and also The Little Friend, which was only slightly less-good (and probably would stand on its own better if I'd never read Secret History).

vegankitty
01-26-2008, 09:52 AM
I'm reading 4 books right now:

1. Special Topics in Calamity Physics, by Marisha Pessl. It sounded so promising; a story of a group of students whose mentor is murdered. It's told from the point of view of one of the students, and it incorporates science and philosophy into the story. I was very excited but just can't seem to get into it.

2. The Secret History, by Donna Tartt. This was really great. It was what inspired me to start Special Topics. It describes five students and an elderly mentor at a university studying ancient Greek. Some of the students murder one of the students in the group, in an effort to cover up a previous crime. The book starts with the murder and then backtracks in time and tells the story of how they got there. Really fascinating, and the author uses extensive knowledge of Greek, history, art, and literature, and all the characters are well-developed and complex..

3. Interpreter of Maladies, by Jhumpa Lahiri. This is a collection of short stories written by the author of The Namesake. I really enjoyed The Namesake, and I think I'm enjoying this even more! I like that you can read the stories one at a time, and they are all so colorfully written. I'd really recommend it.

4. I'm re-reading the last three Chronicles of Narnia. Just because I love them. I read them as a child with complete ignorance of the religious undertones, which is why I'm still able to enjoy them as an adult.

Oooh-I loved both The Secret History and Interepter of Maladies.Both were whim buys that worked out well-I'll have to check out Jhumpa Lahiri's other book.

LazyGirl
01-27-2008, 12:17 PM
Just finishing up The Art and Science of Dumpster Diving by John Hoffman. I have no intention of taking up dumpster diving; I've just been interested in reading this book for a long time, and decided to include it in my last amazon.com order. The book contains some interesting and very useful information if you can get past the fact that its author is a first class, grade A a$$hole (my god, Ayn Rand has a lot to account for!). The chapter on "Information Diving" was a real eye-opener, and I am now paranoid about everything that goes into my trash can. That chapter might be especially useful for activists of all kinds. Hoffman details how certain information was used to the detriment of a local planned parenthood clinic (I'm assuming; he never specifically gives the name of the organization). Pissed me off big time.

sitting_vegan
02-03-2008, 08:26 PM
I've been on a veg*n reading BINGE! Cookbooks, the old standbys, etc.

I just got "Skinny Bitch" out of the library today and my son (he's 8, almost 9) is reading it-I figured the language would keep him entertained and there is some good information in there, kinda presented at a level that he can understand!

KaliMama
02-03-2008, 08:52 PM
Oh, my. I found Skinny Bitch to be mindbogglingly misogynist and abusive. Preying on women's sad desires to fit some culturally bankrupt ideal of womanhood while feeding their insecurities with abusive and insulting language. Nice.

"Eating onions and garlic will make your breath smell like someone took a crap down your throat." Is that witty? Or is it just good nutritional advice? Like "You'll learn to love that hungry feeling?"

I loathe that book.

/rant

veganshawn
02-03-2008, 10:08 PM
Oh, my. I found Skinny Bitch to be mindbogglingly misogynist and abusive. Preying on women's sad desires to fit some culturally bankrupt ideal of womanhood while feeding their insecurities with abusive and insulting language. Nice.

"Eating onions and garlic will make your breath smell like someone took a crap down your throat." Is that witty? Or is it just good nutritional advice? Like "You'll learn to love that hungry feeling?"

I loathe that book.

/rant

You missed the point of the book, seems like a lot of people have a huge misunderstanding about them, my wife really liked it a lot, in her words "they write like I speak" so I guess my wife is a misogynist and abusive ha ha. Check out the authors interview on Herbivores website, she clears up a lot of misconceptions people have about this book.

vegankitty
02-03-2008, 11:32 PM
I lost His Dark Materials 200 pages from the end. :mad: I ordered just The Amber Spyglass to finish it.

I am currently reading Making a Killing and Siddhartha. I really enjoyed Siddhartha when i read it at 16.

rick green
02-04-2008, 03:17 AM
Recently read 50 poems of Hafiz (http://www.amazon.com/Fifty-Poems-of-Hafiz/dp/B000PY32A6/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1202112623&sr=8-8) ed. A.J. Arberry
Reading now: A Passage to India (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Passage_to_India) by E.M. Forster, La Rosa Separada (http://www.powells.com/cgi-bin/biblio?inkey=1-9781556592256-2) by Pablo Neruda (http://www.powells.com/cgi-bin/biblio?inkey=1-9781556592256-2), Antologia del la Poesia Hispanoamericana Contemporanea by various authors.

sitting_vegan
02-04-2008, 01:23 PM
Oh, my. I found Skinny Bitch to be mindbogglingly misogynist and abusive. Preying on women's sad desires to fit some culturally bankrupt ideal of womanhood while feeding their insecurities with abusive and insulting language. Nice.

"Eating onions and garlic will make your breath smell like someone took a crap down your throat." Is that witty? Or is it just good nutritional advice? Like "You'll learn to love that hungry feeling?"

I loathe that book.

/rant

The very last page from the authors explains that they don't REALLY want women to fit some cultural ideal etc, but they thought that naming the book as they did and writing it as they did would garner attention and hopefully open some eyes. I'm paraphrasing here. I think they were going for shock value, and yeah it's pretty over-the-top obnoxious. I read the China Study a few weeks ago and some of the other 'vegan classics' so this was a light read in comparison...They are going for gross humor I suppose.

stegan
02-07-2008, 07:46 PM
I love it when this happens- I went to the library and picked up a book by an author that someone else recommended to me, and on the way out I grabbed another book, based on a cool cover and the following description:


a literary retro-pulp science-fiction-mystery-superhero novel

The book by the author that was recommended was wretched- I actually stopped a quarter of the way through. But the other book was Spaceman Blues (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0765316145/ref=s9_asin_image_1_subs_55_15_14_9_7-2717_g1?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-3&pf_rd_r=1FVM9VJ6730PRB7S5MD4&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=278240801&pf_rd_i=507846) by Brian Francis Slattery, and it just blew me away. It really is what the description says- a science fiction story that never leaves contemporary New York, a clever tweaking of evangelists, a journey into a world that no one ever sees. In fact, except for the cockfighting scene, it was just about one of my favorite reads of the last few years.

KaliMama
02-07-2008, 09:03 PM
That sounds awesome, Stegan. I hope my library has it.

I just finished re-reading Alice Hoffman's Turtle Moon. I love her.

veganshawn
02-07-2008, 11:12 PM
Days and Nights of Love and War, by Eduardo Galeano. It is a book on the struggles in Latin America in the 50-70's. It is really sad, scary and all around amazing.

Miso Vegan
02-08-2008, 12:10 AM
That sounds like a great book, veganshawn, right up my alley. I'm going to put it on my library list. Thanks!

Dugan
02-08-2008, 08:46 AM
I just finished re-reading Alice Hoffman's Turtle Moon
I got that from the library last week and just started it last night.

Milkweed
02-08-2008, 11:20 AM
I just started Lust by Elfriede Jelinek. It's about a woman whose husband has basically decided that she exists solely to satisfy his every sexual whim. Jelinek won the Nobel Prize for literature, and the book is written so beautifully it's almost scary, especially because the content is horrifying. I'm hoping it's not all as bleak as the first few chapters have been.

KaliMama
02-09-2008, 12:11 AM
I got that from the library last week and just started it last night.

Alice Hoffman is like an old friend. I can always pick up a book by her and know that I will not be disappointed. I read Turtle Moon a bazillion years ago, and it was still a wonderful this time.

Ditto Margaret Atwood.

bumblebee
02-09-2008, 03:42 AM
I'm still very slowly reading God is not great. I'm liking it.

JasperKat
02-09-2008, 10:50 AM
Ditto Margaret Atwood.

:yes: I haven't sampled any of her poetry, but I love everything I've read from her. Cat's Eye and The Robber Bride are stellar.

-JK

KaliMama
02-09-2008, 11:44 AM
:yes: I haven't sampled any of her poetry, but I love everything I've read from her. Cat's Eye and The Robber Bride are stellar.

I'm now reading "Wilderness Tips" again. It's nice to re-visit authors that I love. But I do need to get to the library for something new.

veganshawn
02-09-2008, 02:17 PM
I'm still very slowly reading God is not great. I'm liking it.

:D

Dugan
02-09-2008, 04:54 PM
I like Maragaret Atwood too, including her poetry. I just read one of hers. It went back to the library this afternoon and I've already forgotten the title.

JasperKat
02-11-2008, 11:49 AM
That's not exactly a ringing endorsement, Dugan! :silly:

-JK

Dugan
02-11-2008, 01:27 PM
:laugh: I guess not, though it is more indicative of my (lack of) memory than the quality of her work.

Pisces86
02-11-2008, 04:56 PM
currently reading fit for life...trying to get back in the swing of things

Milkweed
02-12-2008, 12:07 PM
I picked up a copy of God is Not Great on Saturday, and finished it last night. It wasn't what I was expecting, but I liked it. I think. I definitely liked parts, and totally agree with most of what he says, but...I'm not sure how to put my finger on how I feel about it. I'll probably re-read sections of it throughout the week and see what I think after it's settled a bit.

sitting_vegan
02-12-2008, 02:05 PM
I just read God Is Not Great also, and I liked his arguments...the only thing that put me off a bit was his tone, he seemed a bit TOO emotionally invested in his own arguments.

I wish I could get my mom to read that book.

Milkweed
02-14-2008, 11:16 AM
Ha I don't even want to know what my mom has to say about the title (I would say the book, but I know she wouldn't touch it). *shudder*

I've decided that I really like it, although I agree with you sitting_vegan re. tone. I mean, it's great that he's passionate about it, but he could have toned down the use of the word "idiot" and the like. No need to name call...although after a pretty convincing argument, and examples galore, describing a system that's "violent, irrational, intolerant, allied to racism and tribalism and bigotry, invested in ignorance and hostile to free enquiry, contemptuous of women and coercive toward children" as idiotic seems somewhat understandable. Perhaps we should all be so outraged.

nauthiz
02-14-2008, 12:00 PM
I hate to admit it, but my level of outrage over religion is approaching Hitchens's level, and I can't really fault him for being open about it. Any ideology that says, "We're the good people, we go to Heaven; they're the bad people, they go to Hell." is encouraging a truly frightening worldview. The idea that such a profound level of elitism (and contempt) can be considered a paragon of morality in this day and age. . . I don't know what to say about it. It truly baffles me. It makes it hard for me to have much faith in humanity.

vegankitty
02-14-2008, 12:58 PM
I finally finished His Dark Materials.I loved it.I loved the ending.I knew Lyra was Eve and Mary was the snake and I guessed Will would be Adam , but I wasn't expecting the temptation Lyra faced to be something so simple or to parallell the story of Eve so closely. I liked that love saved the world(s).I liked that instead of being the downfall of humankind as Eve was in the bible , Lyra was the savior of humanity.I thought it was so sad that Will and Lyra couldn't be together.If I had kids I would want them to read this.(Despite the many non-vegan references-i was somewhat disturbed by all the animal skins and furs in the book.)

sitting_vegan
02-14-2008, 02:23 PM
..."We're the good people, we go to Heaven; they're the bad people, they go to Hell."...

As a child attending Sunday school and church, I questioned things like that-How do WE know that we are the ones going to heaven? The other ones think they are right also, what makes us so sure? and ...The Bible is true because it says it's true...also didn't sit well with me.

nauthiz
02-14-2008, 03:21 PM
The Bible is true because it says it's true...also didn't sit well with me.
I was rather delighted when I started reading the Digha Nikaya and discovered that every sutta beings with "Thus I have heard".

Milkweed
02-14-2008, 06:00 PM
yeah the whole "because the it says so" is so frustrating, and totally puts an end to any intelligent conversation. I hate when you're just getting into a really good philosophical debate and then someone pulls out the bible card, as if it's supposed to mean something to you. Where do you even begin? I guess with "umm...so what?"

Hey maybe we should move this convo to a more appropriate thread...

VegeTexan
02-15-2008, 06:15 AM
yeah the whole "because the it says so" is so frustrating, and totally puts an end to any intelligent conversation. I hate when you're just getting into a really good philosophical debate and then someone pulls out the bible card, as if it's supposed to mean something to you. Where do you even begin? I guess with "umm...so what?"

Hey maybe we should move this convo to a more appropriate thread...

Milkweed, maybe you can just join in their game and say,

"Certain books were left out of the bible for political reasons. Have you read the Essene Gospel of Peace? It's one of those books that was left out of the bible because it was a bit controversial.

In it Jesus is quoted as saying

"And the flesh of slain beasts in his body will become his own tomb. For I tell you truly, he who kills, kills himself, and whoso eats the flesh of slain beasts, eats of the body of death. For in his blood every drop of their blood turns to poison; in his breath their breath to stink; in his flesh their flesh to boils; in his bones their bones to chalk; in his bowels their bowels to decay; in his eyes their eyes to scales; in his ears their ears to waxy issue. And their death will become his death."

But that's just what Jesus supposedly said. I don't know."



http://www.thenazareneway.com/essene_gospel_of_peace_book1.htm

VegeTexan
02-15-2008, 06:48 AM
4524

Miso Vegan
02-15-2008, 10:51 AM
"aminals" :laugh: That's still how my son says it and I don't want to correct him.

mamaquilla
02-15-2008, 12:25 PM
:heart:

Emiloid
02-16-2008, 06:27 PM
I just started The China Study. Pretty good, so far!

Emiloid
02-16-2008, 06:40 PM
You missed the point of the book, seems like a lot of people have a huge misunderstanding about them, my wife really liked it a lot, in her words "they write like I speak" so I guess my wife is a misogynist and abusive ha ha. Check out the authors interview on Herbivores website, she clears up a lot of misconceptions people have about this book.
I think you're right in a way, but I think it means that this book is one some people are really going to enjoy, and others just won't. I read part of it and thought it was terrible, but I can see how it might appeal to some people. Thanks for pointing out the interview, although I can't find it online anywhere. However, I really don't think you should have to read an interview in order to "get" a book. They should have made their point more clear in the book itself, you know? :umm:

It could also be true that even if the interview sheds some light on the subject, a lot of people will still be uninterested or irritated by the book. But that's OK! We don't all have to like the same things. :)

veganshawn
02-16-2008, 08:07 PM
Reading The Genius of Impeachment by John Nichols

The fact that GWB and company have not been impeached and hung for treason shows how truly out of touch this country is with "freedom".

veganshawn
02-16-2008, 08:08 PM
I think you're right in a way, but I think it means that this book is one some people are really going to enjoy, and others just won't. I read part of it and thought it was terrible, but I can see how it might appeal to some people. Thanks for pointing out the interview, although I can't find it online anywhere. However, I really don't think you should have to read an interview in order to "get" a book. They should have made their point more clear in the book itself, you know? :umm:

It could also be true that even if the interview sheds some light on the subject, a lot of people will still be uninterested or irritated by the book. But that's OK! We don't all have to like the same things. :)

http://herbivoremagazine.com/subscribers/10-07/242

Here is the interview. Good points by the way.

sitting_vegan
02-19-2008, 06:43 PM
I just finished PopCo (great!) Twilight (pretty good) and Vegan Freaks (great!)

Shion
02-24-2008, 10:40 PM
I'm re-reading "Dune," and I intend to start "Traitor to the Blood" tonight.

veganshawn
02-24-2008, 10:49 PM
Reading Days of War, Nights of Love by CrimethInc. ex-Workers' Collective.

SURFVEGAN
02-25-2008, 12:59 PM
I'm reading: the Secret Garden
The Creation of Patriarchy
Lunch Lessons: Changing the Way We Feed Our Children
along with multiple text books :sweat:

KaliMama
02-25-2008, 02:13 PM
Fiction: I have a habit of reading an author at a time. I'll find a book that I like, and read everything else I can get my hands on by that author. Right now I'm reading Brendan Halpin (http://brendanhalpin.typepad.com/).

Donorboy (http://books.google.com/books?id=kbMAAAAACAAJ&dq=inauthor:Brendan+inauthor:Halpin) was about a young girl whose two moms were killed in a freak accident involving tofurkey. She goes to live with her biological father, whom she dubs "donorboy." The story it told entirely via her grief journal, emails and instant messages and text messages. I loved it.

Then I read Long Way Back (http://books.google.com/books?id=qp_pGQAACAAJ&dq=inauthor:Brendan+inauthor:Halpin), about a man who loses his wife and his faith in God, and then finds meaning again through punk rock. I cried like a baby at the end.

I'm on Dear Catastrophe Waitress (http://books.google.com/books?id=pkZtAAAACAAJ&dq=inauthor:Brendan+inauthor:Halpin) now.

Concurrently reading Richard Stallman's Free Software, Free Society (http://books.google.com/books?id=gRAMAAAACAAJ&dq=inauthor:Richard+inauthor:Stallman) and Dolly Parton's autobiography. John Perkins Confessions of an Economic Hit Man (http://books.google.com/books?id=gRAMAAAACAAJ&dq=inauthor:Richard+inauthor:Stallman) is next up.

KaliMama
02-25-2008, 02:16 PM
Concurrently reading Richard Stallman's Free Software, Free Society (http://books.google.com/books?id=gRAMAAAACAAJ&dq=inauthor:Richard+inauthor:Stallman) and Dolly Parton's autobiography.

I made my own self laugh reading that.

Provoked
02-27-2008, 07:30 PM
In a timely manner, in concert with the Hallmark - Westland MEat packing plant - I'm reading Slaughterhouse by Gail Eisnitz. It's brutal..... the first interview in the book took place less than 20 minutes from my home. Needless to say, I'm not so pleased with my town anymore...... Short book - but it's not good for continous "pleasure" reading.

Emiloid
02-28-2008, 01:31 AM
Ooooh! I read Slaughterhouse when I first went vegan. It was riveting and a tad painful. And infuriating. Anyway, I really enjoyed it.

These days I'm still reading The China Study. I read a big chunk of it the first weekend after I got it, and since then I've been stealing a few pages here and there. It's really interesting.

vegankitty
02-28-2008, 08:30 AM
I started Slaghterhouse when I first went vegan too.It was during Bonnie's teething phase and sne chewed it up before I was done!

I really wish I could get a library card. Before I got clean I was illegally evicted and all my stuff got thrown out , including ten library books.I owe a ton of fines , so I haven't gotten a new one,

I just finished Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler.I read it for a women's sci-fi/anarchism bookclub meetup , but the meetup is scheduled for the weekend I go away , so I'm going to miss it. It was really good. I'm a big sci-fi fan.

Provoked
03-02-2008, 04:02 PM
Now reading Gary Franceon - Your Dog or Your Child

Have listened to all his audio on his site - The best arguments for animal rights as opposed to animal welfare that I know of. It's definately the law that allows for animal ownership that's the source.... how's that for a mountain to have to climb? Oh well, I know I've got on my hiking shoes.....:)

LadyMay
03-02-2008, 04:30 PM
Right now I am reading The Jungle by Upton Sinclair. Pretty interesting so far...

Just finished Son of a Witch, the sequal to wicked. Love them both. Love the author. I will be reading more of his stuff soon.

Provoked
03-03-2008, 06:11 AM
Now reading Gary Franceon - Your Dog or Your Child

Have listened to all his audio on his site - The best arguments for animal rights as opposed to animal welfare that I know of. It's definately the law that allows for animal ownership that's the source.... how's that for a mountain to have to climb? Oh well, I know I've got on my hiking shoes.....:)

OOOOps! just to correct myself - "Your Child or the Dog". :)

veganshawn
03-03-2008, 10:02 AM
His Dark Materials - So far it is really good.

vegankitty
03-03-2008, 10:13 AM
I'm reading Redemption:The Myth of Pet Overpopulation and the No-Kill Revolution by Nathan Winograd. Very good so far , but very sad statistics. It's making really hate HSUS.

stegan
03-05-2008, 12:39 PM
Jonathan Lethem- The Fortress of Solitude

It's a slog of a read, but I'm enjoying it. His writing style I would describe as "literary pointillism"- there's so much detail to look at up close, and he spares none of it. And I can sort of relate- he puts you in the head of a kid growing up in Brooklyn in the 70's and all of the analysis the kid does of the world surrounding him. I was that kid- everyone thought I was just quiet, but I was really just taking in everything that was going on. :)

Emiloid
03-19-2008, 10:36 PM
I'm still reading The China Study. I read about 100 pages in the first weekend, and ever since then I've been reading a dozen or so pages every few nights. It's really good, but I'm pressed for time!

I've also been reading the newspaper (sometimes) and a couple of magazines. Yeah. It's not like I never read stuff. I'm just a dilettante.

KaliMama
03-19-2008, 10:45 PM
I'm just a dilettante.

:laugh: Such a lovely word!

I am a ne'er-do-well, myself.

Oh! And reading, um...a Boondocks collection (All the Rage), The Madness of Love by Katharine Davies and Practical Ethics by Peter Singer. On my bedside table calling out to me: Jean Donaldson's Culture Clash. I am loving Jean Donaldson (thanks herbi!) :heart:

veganshawn
03-19-2008, 10:54 PM
Just finished His Dark Materials, I absolutely loved all three books.

Now reading Lies my teachers told me

vegankitty
03-28-2008, 10:13 PM
I just finished The Unbearable Lightness of Being. Near the end is a very animal friendly section where he calls people cow parasites (I think that was the phrase-I had to return it) because we live off their flesh and milk. It made me wonder if Milan Kundera was vegetarian or just a contemplative omni.

I googled to see if he was a vegetarian and they have a quote from The Unbearable Lightness of Being on vegan outreach's site.

KaliMama
04-13-2008, 10:03 PM
Has anyone read Thanking the Monkey (http://www.thankingthemonkey.com./)?

bluedawg
04-13-2008, 10:05 PM
Has anyone read Thanking the Monkey (http://www.thankingthemonkey.com./)?
you know, i pre-ordered two copies, but i never received them. is it out already?

KaliMama
04-13-2008, 10:10 PM
I don't know. This review sparked my interest:


An Animal Rights Book Without An Overdose of Guilt

Sometimes a book comes along that we feel we must bring to your attention. Thanking the Monkey: Rethinking the Way We Treat Animals by Karen Dawn (Harper, April 29, 2008) is one of those books. It is a successful attempt at bringing information about the animal rights movement into the mainstream world.

The book is colorful, illustrated with cartoons and photos, easy to read, and insightful. If you have ever wondered what exactly are the animal rights issues that get people so emotionally involved, this book gives an overview and lets you decide for yourself what to think and believe.

Dawn writes in the book that her intention is "not to fight with my readers and win the battle for animals rights, and not to force my values on others. The idea, rather, is to tell you everything you wanted to know about animal rights but were afraid to get into a fight about, and to let you weigh that information against your own values. You can decide what practices you find acceptable or not, and how you might avoid supporting what you cannot condone."

Publisher's Weekly gave Dawn's book a starred review and called it a "cogent and thoroughly researched overview of all the major issues in animal rights, past and present." Library Journal called it, "sensitive and informative" and a "highly recommended riveting text." Gloria Steinam writes, "With wisdom and insight. . . [a] bridge between worlds for both the committed and the curious." Actor David Duchovny says, "Give this book to somebody you know who doesn't know." Matthew Scully, author of Dominion, says, "This book is a fast read that can change your life forever."

The author, Karen Dawn, writes the daily e-newsletter DawnWatch that alerts 20,000 readers to coverage of animal issues with information on how to praise or pan the media for its accuracy and attention. She writes opinion pieces for the Los Angeles Times and Washington Post, has hosted her own radio series about animals on Pacifica stations in Houston and Los Angeles, and been a guest on MTV.

What we especially like about this book is that with Karen Dawn's positive track record with the media, she actually has a chance of getting these important messages out into the public. The more we all support her, the larger audiences she can reach. She chose to write in an authentic style and user-friendly presentation that is not preachy or holier-than-thou.

Karen and her publisher are to be commended for presenting hard-to-take information about animal cruelty in medical and cosmetic testing, the abuse of animals for entertainment, and the practical reasons for vegetarian and vegan food choices in ways that will be easier for most people to consider without becoming defensive.

For more information about Karen Dawn's new book and one of the greatest promotional videos you'll ever see, go to www.ThankingtheMonkey.com.

Source (http://blog.seattlepi.nwsource.com/angelanimals/archives/136408.asp?from=blog_last3).

ETA: Amazon says April 29. Doh!

La Végétalienne
04-13-2008, 10:15 PM
That looks interesting- I just checked the college library catalogue and was super excited to see it listed
...but it's "on order" so here's hopin' it gets here before the semester ends! (ooh, it's on order at my hometown library, too!)

Dahlia's Mom
04-13-2008, 11:01 PM
I just [finally] got through Mommies Who Drink. It's irreverent, wacky, sarcastic, and most of all about growth and happiness. As a Mommie who doesn't drink (very often, if at all), I can still say I loved it. I recommend this as a fiction book for parents. Hysterical.

I get all my non-fiction from articles, reference books (The Vegetarian Child, etc), and blogs about interior design, world news, activism, and other interesting things. I'd love some non-fic recommendations since I prefer nonfic books!

Shion
04-23-2008, 10:30 PM
Man I have been soooo lazy about reading. I can't seem to get into anything. Any suggestions?

Shion
04-25-2008, 09:41 PM
Well, I found an old book in the library by Orson Scott Card entitled "A Planet Called Treason." Interesting concept so far, but the sexist undertones keep annoying me.

Oatmeal Girl
04-25-2008, 10:44 PM
Re-reading Eat, Pray, Love. I can't get enough of this book, but the many references to meat-eating really bum me out. I'd still recommend it, though!

stegan
05-02-2008, 09:58 AM
I'm taking a break from (finally) reading the Harry Potter books to read Starbucked: A Double Tall Tale of Caffeine, Commerce, and Culture (http://www.powells.com/biblio/1-9780316013482-3) by Taylor Clark. Really interesting so far- the author's writing style is really humorous, and the story is pretty fascinating. Whatever your opinion of Starbucks, it is helpful I think to understand how something like this happens...

purple dinosaur
05-02-2008, 01:03 PM
I've just finished Louis de Berniere's Birds Without Wings and it was amazing!! I loved it almost as much as I loved Captain Corelli's Mandolin (same author). I highly recommend both!

rick green
05-05-2008, 11:51 PM
Against the Day by Thomas Pynchon. This book is large. But good. So far.

VegeTexan
05-06-2008, 05:42 PM
I haven't been readin much fiction in a while, but today I bought The Good Guy by Dean Koontz. Can't wait to get into it.

JasperKat
05-08-2008, 09:55 AM
I'm half way through Duma Key by Stephen King. As with most of his newer stuff (Everything's Eventual being the exception) I wouldn't be slogging through it if it weren't King.

-JK

VegeTexan
05-08-2008, 10:52 PM
I have to put Dean Koontz on hold. I am reading Thanking the Monkey: Rethinking the Way We Treat Animals by Karen Dawn. She will be a guest on my radio show in early June.
http://www.harpercollins.com/books/9780061351853/Thanking_the_Monkey/index.aspx

KaliMama
05-08-2008, 11:42 PM
! My library copy of "Thanking the Monkey" just came in today. I haven't picked it up yet, though.

bluedawg
05-08-2008, 11:54 PM
i have two copies sitting here on my desk! i haven't been able to start on them yet, though. too busy with end-o-semester and greyhound stuff.