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rick green
12-25-2006, 10:19 PM
Well, no wonder it seemed to end so abruptly!
Ha ha. Yep, I've got to read the other parts too.
I read my first PKD last year: The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch. Whoa. Loved it.
Rumi's great. I haven't read much of his poetry, but I like Sufism in general, especially the teaching stories a la Idries Shah.
I have the Durant's Story of Philosophy. Must read it some time. (Along with hundreds of other wonderful books. Ha ha!)

rick green
01-03-2007, 12:37 AM
Just finished Sounds, Feelings, Thoughts: 70 Poems (http://www.amazon.com/Sounds-Feelings-Thoughts-Seventy-Translation/dp/0691064695) by Wisława Szymborska.
Great book. She's a Polish poet & won the Nobel prize a few years ago. Also rather sympathetic to animals judging from her poems. A great one called "Tarsier," for example. Maybe I'll type it out here later. Recommended.
Edit: Found "Tarsier (http://library.thinkquest.org/11959/szymbor/34poem2.htm)" online.

A different translation from the book, but the gist is the same.

Tarsier

I am a tarsier and a tarsier's son,
the grandson and great-grandson of tarsiers,
a tiny creature, made up of two pupils
and whatever simply could not be left out;
miraculously saved from further alterations -
since I'm no one's idea of a treat,
my coat's too small for a fur collar,
my glands provide no bliss,
and concerts go on without my gut -
I, a tarsier,
sit living on a human fingertip.

Good morning, lord and master,
what will you give me
for not taking anything from me?
How will you reward me for your own magnanimity?
What price will you set on my priceless head
for the poses I strike to make you smile?

My good lord is gracious,
my good lord is kind.
Who else could bear such witness if there were
no creatures unworthy of death?
You yourselves, perhaps?
But what you've come to know about yourselves
will serve for a sleepless night from star to star.

And only we few who remain unstripped of fur,
untorn from bone, unplucked of soaring feathers,
esteemed in all our quills, scales, tusks, and horns,
and in whatever else that ingenious protein
has seen fit to clothe us with,
we, my lord, are your dream,
which finds you innocent for now.

I am a tarsier - the father and grandfather of tarsiers
a tiny creature, nearly half of something,
yet nonetheless a whole no less than others,
so light that twigs spring up beneath my weight
and might have lifted me to heaven long ago
if I hadn't had to fall
time and again
like a stone lifted from hearts
grown oh so sentimental:
I, a tarsier,
know well how essential it is to be a tarsier.

epski
01-05-2007, 01:42 AM
The Bloodless Revolution (http://www.amazon.com/Bloodless-Revolution-Cultural-History-Vegetarianism/dp/0393052206/sr=8-1/qid=1167982244/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/103-4542318-9361441?ie=UTF8&s=books)

bird
01-05-2007, 09:13 AM
Recently finished But Enough About Me...

Currently reading An Annotated Walden.

VegeTexan
01-05-2007, 09:40 AM
Yesterday I finished Screams From a Dying World by VRFer David Agranoff.
http://www.veganrepresent.com/forums/member.php?u=2310
I really enjoyed the stories.

Today I start The Lifelong Activist, a nice how-to book on being more effective and preventing burn-out.
http://www.amazon.com/Lifelong-Activist-Change-Without-Losing/dp/1590560906/sr=1-1/qid=1168011524/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/103-4134978-3440637?ie=UTF8&s=books

LuC
01-05-2007, 09:41 AM
Gosh, doesn't anyone here read fiction??? ;) You guys put me to shame-- I just recovered a box of "Classics" from my folks' house and am re-reading "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep" by Philip K. Dick, the novel upon which the movie "Blade Runner" was based. :p

I loved that book! :)

I'm reading...

Raising Vegan Children in a Non Vegan World by Erin Pavlina
Until I Find You by John Irving
Buddhist Wisdon by Gill Farrer-Halls
Reason for Hope: A Spiritual Journey by Jane Goodall

MissLovely
01-05-2007, 10:07 AM
I've read the The Catcher in The Rye 4 times, and I think I can say with absolute certainty, that it is overblown, uninteresting, and used endlessly in self comparison, to the point of utter boredom.
I'm going to read it again this weekend, because, I like to be armed with this opinion. Stupid book...mutter...mutter.

attackferret
01-05-2007, 10:25 AM
I'm currently working on The Life of Pi by Yann Martel and The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid by C.K. Pralahad.

I also started on The White Man's Burden by William Easterly, but so far it's been a bunch of slanty/not quite accurate attacks on Jeffrey Sachs mixed with wierd slanty statistics, so I don't know if I'm going to push on or not. I wanted it because it was supposed to be a counterpoint to The End of Poverty by Sachs, but so far it hasn't served that purpose. Maybe he'll get over himself and it will get better later.

LazyGirl
01-05-2007, 12:15 PM
At the moment, I have bookmarks in:

A is for Alibi - serial mystery novel (re-read)
Thriftscore - cool book about thrift shopping that is chock full of all kinds of good information and fun to read (re-read)
The Lifelong Activist - my book from VegeTexan

seitanicvegan
01-05-2007, 01:56 PM
I'm in the middle of Thirteen Moons by Charles Frazier (the guy who wrote Cold Mountain) and over halfway through Dominion by Matthew Scully. I'm going to try really hard to finish both this weekend. I'll post back.

KKB
01-06-2007, 10:47 PM
Bookmarks in...

*Hey, Nostradamus by Douglas Coupland -- this one I'm actively reading and will probably finish first

*Even Cowgirls Get The Blues by Tom Robbins

*Various Psychological Science academic journals... etc...:p

Flower
01-07-2007, 12:59 PM
I'm starting Stranger than Fiction by Chuck Palahniuk today.

ithinkicare
01-09-2007, 05:00 PM
what book are you currently reading? what do you think of it? would you recommend it?

i am reading Animal Farm by George Orwell. I am only halfway through, and I am greatly enjoying it. I can't believe I haven't read this already. (so many books to read!) Basically, the animals kick out the abusive farmer and take over. I would definitely recommend it. (as well as 1984 , by the same author)


Invisible Man By: Ralph Ellison so far its amazing

Flower
01-17-2007, 10:35 AM
Just started Lullaby by Chuck Palahniuk.

I've been making my way through all his books and have been really enjoying them all. None of them can beat Fight Club, though, but they're very close!

KKB
01-19-2007, 12:35 AM
Original Zinn
(compilation of Howard Zinn interviews from alternative radio)

:cool:

attackferret
01-19-2007, 01:30 PM
yesterday i was downstairs and the books i was in the middle of were upstairs, but dean koontz's odd thomas was within grabbing distance, so i read it. yep, i'm that lazy.

i give the book an overall score of 'meh'. mr. koontz seems to have some obsession with sticking pop-culture references into the book (elvis was a character for no apparent reason, one character had family die on one of the 9/11 planes, etc.). it was also one of the most anticlimactic books i've read in a very, very long time. i decided to look past the awful cliches and try to get excited about the book in the middle, but by the end the only face i could make was :blank:

mamaquilla
01-19-2007, 02:21 PM
Wading thru The Tree by Colin Tudge - really great narative, fact heavy and fun so far

Nicoleliza
01-19-2007, 03:24 PM
The Wisdom of Yoga by Stephen Cope

If anyone is into yoga/meditation/psychology/eastern thought type of books, I'd recommend this one. It's not like the others I have read. This one has an actual narrative, with characters and everything. It kind of reads like a novel, but with other stuff thrown in, too.

atouria
01-19-2007, 03:28 PM
The Wisdom of Yoga by Stephen Cope

If anyone is into yoga/meditation/psychology/eastern thought type of books, I'd recommend this one. It's not like the others I have read. This one has an actual narrative, with characters and everything. It kind of reads like a novel, but with other stuff thrown in, too.

ohh that sounds good. :)

VegeTexan
01-19-2007, 03:29 PM
The Wisdom of Yoga by Stephen Cope

If anyone is into yoga/meditation/psychology/eastern thought type of books, I'd recommend this one. It's not like the others I have read. This one has an actual narrative, with characters and everything. It kind of reads like a novel, but with other stuff thrown in, too.

Thanks, Nicoleliza. I am into yoga/meditation/psych/east thought. I will check it out.

Earth child
01-21-2007, 12:09 PM
Miracles by C.S. Lewis.

michiganveganchick
01-21-2007, 12:17 PM
Among the Thugs by Bill Buford (non-fiction about British football fans)

matriarco
01-21-2007, 01:17 PM
White Like Me: Reflections on Race From a Privileged Son (http://www.softskull.com/detailedbook.php?isbn=1-932360-68-9), by Time Wise. He talks about a lot of important things. I'm not done with it but so far I'd definitely recommend it.

Flower
01-28-2007, 02:09 PM
Yesterday I finished Screams From a Dying World by VRFer David Agranoff.
http://www.veganrepresent.com/forums/member.php?u=2310
I really enjoyed the stories.

I just read this book this afternoon. I really enjoyed it, too!

nauthiz
01-30-2007, 08:39 PM
The Master and Margarita, by Mikhail Bulgakov (Burgin/O'Connor translation)

I just finished it, and I'm dead serious when I say that it is the most elegant novel I have read in years.

Don't repeat my mistake by false starting with the Ginsburg translation; it was made from the original Soviet printing, which was heavily censored.

Flower
01-30-2007, 08:41 PM
The Gutter Limits. It's a collection of short stories by four people. One of them is VRF'er Count Agranoff. I'm about halfway through so far and am in love with it!

dann
01-30-2007, 09:36 PM
The Tipping Point

vegankitty
01-30-2007, 10:12 PM
Midnight's Children by Salman Rushdie

Flower
02-02-2007, 02:37 PM
Invisible Monsters by Chuck Palahniuk. So good! I've read almost the entire book today.

nauthiz
02-02-2007, 02:49 PM
Midnight's Children by Salman Rushdie

How is it? That one is quickly approaching the top of my reading list.

nauthiz
02-02-2007, 02:56 PM
Oh yeah, an Asterix: La Rose et le Glaive.* Hence the avatar.

Going surprisingly well. I think I can safely upgrade my French reading comp - o -meter from "illiterate" to "can barely make sense of a children's picture book." As in, it took me 10 minutes of poring over my dictionary to figure out that Obelix was making fun of someone's pants on page 3.

* The Rose and the Sword

PS: How the hell do you type international characters and accents on Windows? Life without the option key seems to be way harder than life without the second mouse button.

rick green
02-02-2007, 03:06 PM
I usually use "insert" "symbol."

nauthiz
02-02-2007, 03:22 PM
I usually use "insert" "symbol."

Yeah, but that's an incredible pain when you're actually writing something in a language that uses accents or extra characters. Or talking about math or science and wanting to use the standard symbols for variables and constants. I'm used to being able to type twice as many characters without really having to think about it.

Plus, not all applications have that menu. Firefox, for example.

rick green
02-02-2007, 03:25 PM
Yep it is a pain. Sorry I can't help...

vegankitty
02-12-2007, 11:48 PM
How is it? That one is quickly approaching the top of my reading list.
I like it.I'm reading a few other books at the same time.
Your child or the dog by Gary Francione , The 25th Hour and Son of a Preacher Man by Jay Bakker.I just finished Vegan Freak and a cheesy vampire book , The Vampire Memoirs.I was reading Dominion by Matthew Scully but I lost it somewhere , so I ordered a new copy.I'm reading it for a book club.

vegankitty
02-12-2007, 11:52 PM
The Wisdom of Yoga by Stephen Cope

If anyone is into yoga/meditation/psychology/eastern thought type of books, I'd recommend this one. It's not like the others I have read. This one has an actual narrative, with characters and everything. It kind of reads like a novel, but with other stuff thrown in, too.
This sounds good!

Flower
02-13-2007, 07:53 AM
I'm currently reading Haunted by Chuck Palahniuk. After this, I'll have read all of his fiction books. I love them!

bird
02-13-2007, 09:04 AM
Bought a few books recently that I am rotating through:

Love is... In Bloom by Kim Casali

Learned Optimism and Authentic Happiness by Martin Seligman

95 Poems by e.e. cummings

100 Love Sonnets by Pablo Neruda

veganshawn
02-13-2007, 09:36 AM
Ishtar, Cometbus #50, and various skate and A/R magazines.

vegankitty
02-19-2007, 11:31 PM
Someone lent me When Elephants Weep today.So I'm reading that and Dominion.

Joda
02-20-2007, 08:49 PM
Someone lent me When Elephants Weep today.

Let me know what you think of 'When Elephants Weep'... I read it a number of years back and would read it again.

Currently, I'm reading 'information for Artists - a practical guide for visual and media artists'... text for my 'Business of Art' class :cool:

VegeTexan
02-20-2007, 09:11 PM
"Hour of the Wolf", by Robert McCammeron. It's a werewolf novel about a man with Lycantrophy who is an agent working against the nazis in WWII. It is why I felt the change come on last Sunday night.

vegancellist
02-20-2007, 09:24 PM
"Not Buying It: My Year Without Shopping" by Judith Levine

VegeTexan
02-20-2007, 09:29 PM
wow, I can do that, except for groceries

Jessica
02-20-2007, 10:49 PM
wow, I can do that, except for groceries

I could if I stocked up the year before. :silly:

Tracy G
02-28-2007, 02:39 PM
Learned Optimism and Authentic Happiness by Martin Seligman

I'm curious to know what you think of these. As of today, Seligman's Positive Psychology project is now officially late with my automated three-month reminder. I'm unable to log on and complete my participant questionnaires.

As a precision-oriented person, I find this makes me... unhappy. :p

Anyways, I read three fashion history books during the past month or so. These were all pretty good:

• Decades of Beauty by Kate Mulvey & Melissa Richards (1998).
• Fifty Years of Fashion by Valerie Steele (1997).
• The Rudi Gernreich Book by Peggy Moffitt (1991).

And have recently moved on to the topic of parrots. I like this one very much:

• Parrots for Dummies by Nikki Moustaki (2005).

bird
02-28-2007, 03:44 PM
I bought Learned Optimism but haven't started it yet. I am more than halfway through Authentic Happiness and am very impressed, as I figured I would be, given the author. I recommended it to my cousin as well.

Last night I started Interpeter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri and so far am enjoying it very much.

mishka
02-28-2007, 03:59 PM
I'm currently reading Haunted by Chuck Palahniuk. After this, I'll have read all of his fiction books. I love them!
Flower - the boy wants to know what you thought of the book.

Flower
02-28-2007, 04:01 PM
Flower - the boy wants to know what you thought of the book.

It was pretty good, but out of all of his books, I'd have to say this is my least favorite. I still liked it a lot, though. Some of the stories in it were quite good! Is he a Palahniuk fan?

I just started reading Brother Odd by Dean Koontz.

quagga
02-28-2007, 04:06 PM
I bought Learned Optimism but haven't started it yet. I am more than halfway through Authentic Happiness and am very impressed, as I figured I would be, given the author. I recommended it to my cousin as well.

Is the author Martin Seligman, the researcher who pioneered the concept of learned helplessness? Does he address his use of animals (dogs, I believe) to develop that theory?

Tracy G
02-28-2007, 06:31 PM
Yes, the author of those books is the same man who did the research on learned helplessness. The info is probably fresher in bird's mind, but as I recall, Seligman does mention that in Authentic Happiness.

I basically agree with you, bird, about Authentic Happiness—I thought it contained interesting ideas.

I'm uncertain of the status of the study, however. The positive psychology page (http://www.ppresearch.sas.upenn.edu/exercise/) states "new participants are being sought," while the online research page (http://www.ppresearch.sas.upenn.edu/) states "this study is no longer accepting new participants." It appears that the study closed on February 19. I can log on, but I just get a message "nothing currently scheduled," even though I'm due for my three-month feedback. Weird. Oh well.

vegancellist
03-04-2007, 09:23 PM
i just finished Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim by David Sedaris (hilarious!). Now i'm reading Know it All by A.J. Jacobs.

d_arkangel
03-04-2007, 09:28 PM
I recently finished reading "The Working Poor: Invisible in America" By Shipler, which was sad, but eye opening.. and now i'm reading "Democracy's Edge" by Frances Moor Lappe, which so far is inspiring, but too 'welfarist' in that she recommends that we should try to reform huge corporations (like McDonald's). I think we shoud just not shop at them and choose to support companies that are doing what we actually want in regards to employee treatment, not using animals as property, promoting small business, and supporting sustainability, instead of supporting corporations for 'taking a step in the right direction'. Besides that, I'm finding her book to be very empowering, and practically useful.

vegankitty
03-04-2007, 10:11 PM
Break , Blow , Burn :Camille Paglia reads 43 of the world's best poems.Very interesting.Ananlyzes the poems which helps me understand them a lot better.

Tracy G
03-05-2007, 10:12 AM
I'm uncertain of the status of the study... I can log on, but I just get a message "nothing currently scheduled," even though I'm due for my three-month feedback...

Ah, never mind. Seligman's research team actually meant "three months plus one week," since I received my reminder e-mail today and was able to complete the questionnaires.

Not currently reading anything, but I just ordered the Vikings (http://www.teach12.com/ttcx/coursedesclong2.aspx?cid=3910&pc=Search) course from The Teaching Company. Will report back on that later (in the movie thread, I guess, since I got the DVD format).

Miso Vegan
03-05-2007, 10:27 AM
bird sent me Misfortune (http://www.amazon.com/Misfortune-Novel-Wesley-Stace/dp/0316154482/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-0729966-3172912?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1173111947&sr=8-1), by Wesley Stace (a.k.a. John Wesley Harding), for my upcoming birthday, and I'm about 4 pages into it and love it already!

veganmama
03-05-2007, 11:31 AM
Currently Teach Your Own, by John Holt- a book about homeschooling/ unschooling- our newest adventure!

Miso Vegan
03-05-2007, 12:28 PM
I like John Holt. :yes:

vegankitty
03-06-2007, 11:19 PM
Lantern Books is having a sale-20% off all titles.They have a lot of animal rights books and they are a small publisher who needs support.They have some titles I want but I am in cvredit card debt as it is.If anyone has any books on AR and companion animals or just on companion animals they want to send me?:D

Jessica
03-07-2007, 01:03 AM
I just read James Patterson's "Step on a Crack."

I'm not impressed with this rash of cowritten books he's putting out.
I assume it's always the cowriter who's writing them because
1. They suck & aren't Pattersonesque.
2. The cowriter gets known because he's cowritten a Patterson book.
3. Patterson looks good because he's cranking out books one right after the other.

I say :no:.

Two of my reserved books came into the li-barry and I went and picked them up today.

One is "Childfree and Sterilized: Women's decisions and medical responses." and the other is "Living Alone & Loving it: A guide to relishing the solo life."
I haven't cracked either yet.

The librarian must think I'm nuts or obsessive because I picked up those 2 books, and I was wearing this shirt (http://www.cafepress.com/testacular.108134684). (Make sure to enlarge to see the actual font-people. Thank you, Wonder.)

Vegan Angelik
03-07-2007, 01:33 AM
Im reading a book i got off fo ebay called Vegan Freak by Toress somethign or another, lol

Its ok, but not GREAT

vegankitty
03-07-2007, 01:36 AM
Funny tee , Jessica .I thought about having my tubes tied but I'm 37 and I figure it won't be to long until menopause anyway.

Flower
03-07-2007, 06:30 AM
I just read James Patterson's "Step on a Crack."

I'm not impressed with this rash of cowritten books he's putting out.
I assume it's always the cowriter who's writing them because
1. They suck & aren't Pattersonesque.
2. The cowriter gets known because he's cowritten a Patterson book.
3. Patterson looks good because he's cranking out books one right after the other.

I say :no:.

Oh no! This book is on my list of things to read because I like his books. I'll still read it, but I know what you're saying about cowriters. :umm:

bird
03-07-2007, 09:02 AM
Is the author Martin Seligman, the researcher who pioneered the concept of learned helplessness? Does he address his use of animals (dogs, I believe) to develop that theory?yes, same author. he does not mention anything about animals in authentic happiness. authentic happiness is pretty much all in the positive psychology field. i don't think he mixes much of his depression research into it, except to explain how his experiences treating depressed patients led him to wonder why a certain percentage of them never got better, which led him to develop the positive psychology field.


Last night I started Interpeter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri and so far am enjoying it very much.finally finished this last night. i had read one of the stories in it before, and am glad i got to finish the whole collection now. highly recommended. :thumbsup:

rick green
03-07-2007, 09:37 AM
I enjoyed Lahiri's novel once a while ago (nice phrase). :)
I think it was called The Namesake. Glad you liked her story collection, bird.

Currently reading The White Castle (http://www.librarything.com/work/8509) by Orhan Pamuk. It very nearly caused me to miss a connecting flight in Detroit, which I reckon speaks well for the book. It's just the kind of thing I like: short, compelling, mysterious, exotic, symbolic, tricky, surreal... totally enjoyable.

Also enjoying The Teachings of the Compassionate Buddha (http://www.librarything.com/work/435169) in light of my recent meditation retreat.

attackferret
03-07-2007, 10:32 AM
we just had a person come and talk to us (employees of the homeless shelter) about vicarious trauma - turns out, most of us had a fair number of symptoms without even realizing it. i'm thinking of going to the library and picking out a book about it, hopefully with stuff about how to process and deal with it. anyone have any suggestions?

nauthiz
03-07-2007, 10:45 AM
Recently finished:

Under the Banner of Heaven (http://www.randomhouse.com/features/krakauer/) by Jon Krakauer. Extremely well written & fascinating, I tore through it. A bit sensationalist, but not annoyingly so.

Bones of the Master (http://www.randomhouse.com/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9780553379082) by George Crane. On its surface, a travelogue. Really, I think of it more as a portrait of a Ch'an monk. Writing is a bit uneven - some chapters are composed of beautiful, poetic prose, others are very direct and unassuming. Still, the writing is solid and I got wrapped up in this book.

Just starting: Two Arrows Meeting in Mid Air (http://www.amazon.com/Two-Arrows-Meeting-Mid-Air-Enlightenment/dp/0804830126) by John Daido Loori. Zen koans and commentary. I've only finished reading about one koan so far. Definitely not the same thing as reading suttas with commentary. Not sure that this is the best way to approach Zen, I've read extensive commentary on a few koans before and it's never helped me to have any insight into the koan. Maybe writing a book like this is like trying to explain color to someone who is blind from birth. I'll probably finish it since I have a lot of L rides ahead of me, but I'm thinking maybe starting to go to a Zendo is a better way to approach this subject.

rick green
03-07-2007, 10:54 AM
I really liked Bones of the Master. Agree about the uneven quality of the writing, but considering the author has a thing about not revising, it's understandable. Many images from that book have stuck with me since I read it in, what... 2002? (And that's more than I can say for any number of books.) The monk's harrowing journey south during starvation times in communist China, the night-time descent of the mountain without a flashlight, the stuff about foxes, and the sweet friendship that develops over time between the Mongolian monk and the American deadbeat (sorry... poet). Nice book.

nauthiz
03-07-2007, 11:13 AM
Agree about the uneven quality of the writing, but considering the author has a thing about not revising, it's understandable.

Yeah, I should disclaim a bit:

I liked the uneven quality of his writing. It made each chapter seem fresh and new. Sort of like how the animation styles and whatnot are different from segment to segment on Sesame Street.* And it's not like some sections were well written and others weren't - the writing was solid from start to finish.

*This probably has more than a little to do with my short attention span.

grog
03-07-2007, 11:14 AM
we just had a person come and talk to us (employees of the homeless shelter) about vicarious trauma - turns out, most of us had a fair number of symptoms without even realizing it. i'm thinking of going to the library and picking out a book about it, hopefully with stuff about how to process and deal with it. anyone have any suggestions?

What is it?

mishka
03-07-2007, 11:20 AM
It was pretty good, but out of all of his books, I'd have to say this is my least favorite. I still liked it a lot, though. Some of the stories in it were quite good! Is he a Palahniuk fan?

I just started reading Brother Odd by Dean Koontz.
I totally forgot I asked this. Yeah, yeah he is a Palahniuk fan. He's read other stuff, but I'm not sure what. I think the first story in this book has scared me away from reading any of his work myself, though :confused: I'm not easily shaken, but just hearing about the story made me need to stop and catch my breath!

Flower
03-07-2007, 01:06 PM
I totally forgot I asked this. Yeah, yeah he is a Palahniuk fan. He's read other stuff, but I'm not sure what. I think the first story in this book has scared me away from reading any of his work myself, though :confused: I'm not easily shaken, but just hearing about the story made me need to stop and catch my breath!

I had Mr. Flower read it & he was pretty disturbed by it. At the end of the book, he has a small "warning" chapter where he tells about how every time he's read that story to an audience that at least one person faints at the part where he mentions the corn & peanuts.

Some of the other stories are disturbing, but I'd have to say that "guts" definitely is the worst!

vegankitty
03-08-2007, 12:18 AM
I had Mr. Flower read it & he was pretty disturbed by it. At the end of the book, he has a small "warning" chapter where he tells about how every time he's read that story to an audience that at least one person faints at the part where he mentions the corn & peanuts.

Some of the other stories are disturbing, but I'd have to say that "guts" definitely is the worst!

So I don't have to go back through a lot of threads , what book are you talking about?

Jessica
03-08-2007, 12:51 AM
we just had a person come and talk to us (employees of the homeless shelter) about vicarious trauma - turns out, most of us had a fair number of symptoms without even realizing it. i'm thinking of going to the library and picking out a book about it, hopefully with stuff about how to process and deal with it. anyone have any suggestions?


I can't recommend any books, I don't think I've read any about it. I just wanted to say that we have vicarious trauma workshops because a lot of people in my field (because *gasp* we're human, contrary to popular belief) internalize a lot of things we don't think we do.

Jessica
03-08-2007, 12:53 AM
What is it?


Since I really suck at verbalizing (textualizing!):Vicarious Trauma (http://www.uic.edu/orgs/convening/vicariou.htm)

grog
03-08-2007, 01:24 AM
Since I really suck at verbalizing (textualizing!):Vicarious Trauma (http://www.uic.edu/orgs/convening/vicariou.htm)
ty

Jessica
03-08-2007, 02:19 AM
:laugh:

;) (http://www.lifeprint.com/asl101/pages-signs/w/welcome.htm)* <--link.











*I do use both that "welcome" sign and "no problem" depending on how casual or formal the situation.

Flower
03-08-2007, 06:10 AM
So I don't have to go back through a lot of threads , what book are you talking about?

Haunted by Chuck Palahniuk (the author who wrote Fight Club). :)

stegan
03-13-2007, 08:26 AM
Long Dark Tea Time of The Soul by Douglas Adams. I first read this in high school, and to this day, very few books have made me laugh out loud as much as this one.

JasperKat
03-13-2007, 08:45 AM
I just finished Lisey's Story by Stephen King. It was better than Cell, not as good as....well almost everything else he's written. I'd put it on par with Bag of Bones or Hearts in Atlantis. Miles better than From a Buick 8.

I hate to think he's losing his touch, he's the only horror writer that I enjoy on a semi-regular basis. These latest books are making me :umm:

-JK

Flower
03-13-2007, 08:22 PM
I just finished Lisey's Story by Stephen King. It was better than Cell, not as good as....well almost everything else he's written. I'd put it on par with Bag of Bones or Hearts in Atlantis. Miles better than From a Buick 8.

I hate to think he's losing his touch, he's the only horror writer that I enjoy on a semi-regular basis. These latest books are making me :umm:

-JK

Lisey's Story is on my bookshelf waiting to be read. I've been disappointed in his latest books, too. They just aren't the same as they used to be.

rick green
03-13-2007, 08:30 PM
The New Life by Orhan Pamuk.
Pretty cool.

Miso Vegan
03-14-2007, 08:04 PM
I am now 3/4 through Misfortune and positively in love with this book. I'm going to marry it. Sorry, Nanashi.

JasperKat
03-15-2007, 05:53 PM
Lisey's Story is on my bookshelf waiting to be read. I've been disappointed in his latest books, too. They just aren't the same as they used to be.


Did you like Everything's Eventual? I've always thought that short stories were his stong suit.

-JK

Flower
03-15-2007, 05:54 PM
Did you like Everything's Eventual? I've always thought that short stories were his stong suit.

-JK

Yes, I did! I've always liked short story collections and this one I particlulary enjoyed. :)

mamaquilla
03-15-2007, 05:55 PM
Eduring Lives by Carol Lee Flinders, its about 4 amazing woman and their lives including Jane Goodall :)

Miso Vegan
03-15-2007, 07:13 PM
I am now 3/4 through Misfortune and positively in love with this book. I'm going to marry it. Sorry, Nanashi.
I finished this book today. Seriously, I need someone to talk to about it NOW.

rick green
03-15-2007, 08:54 PM
PopCo by Scarlett Thomas. It's fun.

Flower
03-15-2007, 09:22 PM
I finished this book today. Seriously, I need someone to talk to about it NOW.

Is the author Wesley Stace? I was intrigued and looked it up. It sounds like an amazing book!

*puts on 'to read' list

Miso Vegan
03-15-2007, 09:55 PM
Yes, a.k.a. musician John Wesley Harding

slackar
03-15-2007, 11:59 PM
I'm giving Animal Liberation a read.

100 pages deep, not sure if I'd say I enjoy it or not.

The preface was a lot more interesting than the book itself has been.

How many editions of this book are there? The library I am reading it at only has the second edition. Is that as far as it goes? It seems to have been revised in the late 80's if the examples are an indicator of it's last revision.

gladcow
03-16-2007, 10:01 AM
PopCo by Scarlett Thomas. It's fun.
I really enjoyed that book.

Flower
03-16-2007, 11:17 AM
Yes, a.k.a. musician John Wesley Harding

It might be a while, but I'll read it, so I'll let you know as soon as I'm done!

Miso Vegan
03-16-2007, 11:24 AM
I really enjoyed that book.
Thanks to you, that's next up on my reading list!

Miso Vegan
03-16-2007, 11:25 AM
It might be a while, but I'll read it, so I'll let you know as soon as I'm done!
Yeah, and it's a big book - even with four two-hour plane rides and airport waiting and delayed flights, and nightly reading of about an hour, it still took me over a week to finish it.

But, I got into it within a couple of pages and it was well worth the time investment!

gladcow
03-16-2007, 11:28 AM
Thanks to you, that's next up on my reading list!
:kiss: hope you enjoy it as much as I did. I'm going to attempt "The End of Mr. Y" during my vacation next week.

Flower
03-16-2007, 11:40 AM
Yeah, and it's a big book - even with four two-hour plane rides and airport waiting and delayed flights, and nightly reading of about an hour, it still took me over a week to finish it.

But, I got into it within a couple of pages and it was well worth the time investment!

Oh, good! I love long books. :)

epski
03-16-2007, 12:45 PM
Igniting a Revolution

bird
03-16-2007, 01:41 PM
Just finished The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri. Looking forward to the movie.

rick green
03-16-2007, 02:14 PM
I really enjoyed that book.
Yay!

Thanks to you, that's next up on my reading list!
And Yay!

:D

Flower
03-18-2007, 02:26 PM
I'm starting Breaking the Food Seduction by Neal Barnard today. It's been a long time since I've read something non-fiction and am especially looking forward to this one. I've read a few of his other books and was quite impressed with them.

rick green
03-18-2007, 06:13 PM
Just finished PopCo. Very cool. :cool:

Also looking foreword to The End of Mr. Y, which I got the other day.

LuC
03-18-2007, 06:54 PM
Just started the 'Twinkie, Deconstructed' by Steve Ettlinger.

VegeTexan
03-18-2007, 07:18 PM
Just finished The Rising, by Brian Keene...
a horror novel about zombies

:zombie: :zombie: :zombie: :zombie: :zombie: :zombie: :zombie:

Flower
03-18-2007, 07:21 PM
Just finished The Rising, by Brian Keene...
a horror novel about zombies

:zombie: :zombie: :zombie: :zombie: :zombie: :zombie: :zombie:

Excellent! I loves me some zombies.

rick green
03-21-2007, 05:31 PM
Elizabeth Costello by J. M. Coetzee

veganshawn
03-21-2007, 05:58 PM
Hollywood - Bukowski

Amazing like all of his stuff.

Curse of Lono - Hunter S Thompson

Really cool, has amazing art along with a funny story, large size so I only read it at home, to bulky for the train.

VegeTexan
03-21-2007, 07:53 PM
Started two books today. The Beast House, horror novel by Richard Laymon and a book I got from my workplace's library, The Executive's Guide to Making a Great Speech, by a number of writers. I like read speechmakin books.

sonicdish
03-22-2007, 12:08 AM
i'm in the middle of "Self-made Man" by Norah Vincent. it's amazing. it's about a gay woman who goes undercover and infiltrates the male world. it is extremely interesting.

i also just read "Breakfast of Champions" by Kurt Vonnegut and "The Grapes of Wrath" (wooh).

rick green
03-22-2007, 04:16 AM
Elizabeth Costello is so awesome. Coetzee has her represent hardcore; much of the first half of the book concerns animal rights. This part was so great I had to share it...

‘It’s that I no longer know where I am. I seem to move around perfectly easily among people, to have perfectly normal relations with them. Is it possible, I ask myself, that all of them are participants in a crime of stupefying proportions? Am I fantasizing it all? I must be mad! Yet every day I see the evidences. The very people I suspect produce the evidence, exhibit it, offer it to me. Corpses. Fragments of corpses that they have bought for money.
‘It is as if I were to visit friends, and to make some polite remark about the lamp in their living room, and they were to say, “Yes, it’s nice, isn’t it? Polish-Jewish skin it’s made of, we find that’s best, the skins of young Polish-Jewish virgins.” And then I go to the bathroom and the soap wrapper says, “Treblinka—100% human stearate.” Am I dreaming, I say to myself? What kind of house is this?’

bluedawg
03-22-2007, 12:45 PM
i'm in the middle of "Self-made Man" by Norah Vincent. it's amazing. it's about a gay woman who goes undercover and infiltrates the male world. it is extremely interesting.
she did a talk at a bookstore near my house a couple of months ago, but i wasn't able to attend. the book looked pretty interesting, though.

grog
03-22-2007, 12:47 PM
i'm in the middle of "Self-made Man" by Norah Vincent. it's amazing. it's about a gay woman who goes undercover and infiltrates the male world. it is extremely interesting.


i think i heard her on NPR once, it was pretty neat.

veganshawn
03-22-2007, 01:30 PM
Finished Hollywood, so I will crack open Women for a second read (should be intresting my take on it this time being happily married as opposed to being bitter and single the first time).

vegankitty
03-22-2007, 11:39 PM
I just finished Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston and am now reading Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim by David Sedaris.

michiganveganchick
03-23-2007, 06:54 PM
David Sedaris.

:smitten:

VegeTexan
03-23-2007, 07:11 PM
I just finished Beast House by Richard Laymon, a horror novel. Just started Hannibal by Thomas Harris, you remember Hannibal Lecter, the guy with the different gustatory practices. It's been a month of scary fiction for me and I like it.

Miso Vegan
03-23-2007, 07:47 PM
If you think David Sedaris is funny, you gotta read Magical Thinking by Augusten Burroughs. Oh em gee, it was the funniest read In The World, I was actually crying sometimes, unable to read through my tears and fits.

(Beginning is a bit funny, then it gets progressively funnier and funnier and funnier, finally tapering off to less painful by the end.)

michiganveganchick
03-24-2007, 10:31 PM
If you think David Sedaris is funny, you gotta read Magical Thinking by Augusten Burroughs. Oh em gee, it was the funniest read In The World, I was actually crying sometimes, unable to read through my tears and fits.

(Beginning is a bit funny, then it gets progressively funnier and funnier and funnier, finally tapering off to less painful by the end.)

i did read running w/ scissors several years ago, but haven't read that one -

I saw David Sedaris a couple of times speak when he was in Michigan and he is absutely hysterical. His stories are even funnier hearing him read them.

vegankitty
03-24-2007, 11:35 PM
Now I'm reading The Last King of Scotland.

kopywrited
03-24-2007, 11:40 PM
currently im in the middle of Ghandi's Passion by Stanley Wolpert

quite an interesting read, and its nice to know that he wasnt perfect.

Miso Vegan
03-25-2007, 12:07 AM
I saw David Sedaris a couple of times speak when he was in Michigan and he is absutely hysterical. His stories are even funnier hearing him read them.
I haven't seen him live but I have listened to him read his books on tape - Naked, and Santaland Diaries - his voice tOtally makes it. :laugh:

Miso Vegan
03-26-2007, 05:19 PM
A book for VegeTexan, Flower, and above all, Dandelion:

World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War
by Max Brooks



What if mankind’s greatest foe turns out to be the living dead? That’s the premise of World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War (Crown, 2006), an eerily compelling thriller by Max Brooks. The book is set up as a series of interviews with survivors of the Walking Plague, a potent virus that turns its victims into undead killing machines. Among the interviewees are the Chinese doctor who tried to treat some of the first victims; a Tibetan smuggler; an Israeli intelligence agent; a trafficker of human organs whose work inadvertently spread the virus faster throughout the world; several politicians and soldiers; and more or less ordinary people whose lives were impacted by the virus. There are several pointed references throughout the novel to issues of global politics and the state of the world today, as well as characters who might or might not be based on real people, all of which lends the novel an immediacy and an anchor to reality that it might not have otherwise. There are lots of books, both fiction and nonfiction, written about both World War I and II, but Max Brooks’ is the only one I know of about this particular war, which makes sense, of course, since he’s invented the whole shebang.

Flower
03-26-2007, 05:45 PM
A book for VegeTexan, Flower, and above all, Dandelion:

World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War
by Max Brooks

Oooooo! Thanks, Miso! :kiss:

Dandelion
03-26-2007, 05:53 PM
A book for VegeTexan, Flower, and above all, Dandelion:

World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War
by Max Brooks
:heart: thanks Miso :)
:zombie: :zombie: :zombie:

JasperKat
03-26-2007, 06:00 PM
i did read running w/ scissors several years ago, but haven't read that one -

I saw David Sedaris a couple of times speak when he was in Michigan and he is absutely hysterical. His stories are even funnier hearing him read them.

I also read Running with Scissors, wasn't really crazy about it, it seemed fake to me :umm:

We saw David Sedaris in Ann Arbor, is that where you saw him, MVC?

I'm reading Packaging Girlhood; Rescuing our Daughters from Marketer's Schemes, by Sharon Lamb and Lyn Mikel Brown. I love books like this.

-JK

veganshawn
03-26-2007, 06:34 PM
I also read Running with Scissors, wasn't really crazy about it, it seemed fake to me :umm:

-JK

That is what made Running with Scissors so amazing is how absurd that poor guys life was.

Miso Vegan
03-26-2007, 07:33 PM
Yeah, he had an unbelievably f*ed up life. BUT - nevermind Running with Scissors - Magickal Thinking is freakin' hilarious!!!!

rick green
03-27-2007, 08:42 PM
Just finished No Country for Old Men by a front running candidate for most depressing writer ever status, Cormac McCarthy.

Just started The Animal Rights Crusade: The Growth of a Moral Protest by James M. Jasper & Dorothy Nelkin. Looks good.

gladcow
03-28-2007, 10:07 AM
I'm working through "A Tribe Apart"
Started and finished "Bloodsucking Fiends" by Christopher Moore over vacation
Also reading "In My Blood" by John Sedgwick (and it's really really good)

vegankitty
03-30-2007, 09:24 PM
I'm reading I Never Promised You a Rosegarden , which I read in high school and remember liking first time around.

VegeTexan
03-30-2007, 09:53 PM
Started and finished "Bloodsucking Fiends" by Christopher Moore

uuuu nice title...scanned the amazon.com description, sounds like fun (I am in a horror fiction reading mode, and this one supposedly has comedy
es verdad?

superwife
03-30-2007, 09:54 PM
i'm in the middle of 'sex, drugs and cheap labor' by eric schlosser :)

Flower
03-31-2007, 08:58 AM
I just finished Turn Off the Fat Genese by Neal Barnard yesterday.

Today, I'm starting More Twisted by Jeffery Deaver.

gladcow
03-31-2007, 10:35 AM
uuuu nice title...scanned the amazon.com description, sounds like fun (I am in a horror fiction reading mode, and this one supposedly has comedy
es verdad?
verdad! In a bit I'll be reading the follow-up "You Suck"

hazelfaern
03-31-2007, 08:23 PM
I'm reading I Never Promised You a Rosegarden , which I read in high school and remember liking first time around.

Ohhhh, how I :heart:ed that book when I was younger.

hazelfaern
03-31-2007, 08:27 PM
I have way too many books out from the library. Too many. More than 16, I think. I'm in an exploring-vegan-cooking/reading-about-local-history/dipping-into-Norse-mythology/and -permaculture-too mood. So on the side, I'm reading The Bloodless Revolution.

I :heart: Odin.

vegankitty
03-31-2007, 11:16 PM
verdad! In a bit I'll be reading the follow-up "You Suck"

Tell us how "You Suck" is ; I liked the first one.In fact , after I read it I was looking at his books at the bookstore and they all looked so interesting I couldn't decide and ended up with none.

michiganveganchick
03-31-2007, 11:20 PM
We saw David Sedaris in Ann Arbor, is that where you saw him, MVC?-JK

Yep, that's where I saw him in 2005. He was also at the Detroit Opera House last year, and I saw that one too.

MissLovely
04-02-2007, 09:21 AM
Lessons In Taxidermy-Bee Lavender

It's quite riveting. Much better than I had anticipated.

nauthiz
04-02-2007, 10:53 AM
The Djinn in the Nightingale's Eye by A. S. Byatt. Pomo's not normally my bag of chips, but so far I'm enjoying it quite a bit.

Dandelion
04-02-2007, 11:00 AM
FYI Nauthiz, the book i was reading was Pseudoscience and the Paranormal by Terence Hines

stegan
04-02-2007, 11:02 AM
for the trip to Champaign, I'll be reading "The Left Hand Of Darkness" by Ursula K. Le Guin. That's right, I'm in total middle school dork flashback reading mode. :)

nauthiz
04-02-2007, 11:23 AM
for the trip to Champaign, I'll be reading "The Left Hand Of Darkness" by Ursula K. Le Guin. That's right, I'm in total middle school dork flashback reading mode. :)

That's one of my favorite books ever. I'm just getting off a huge LeGuin binge.

nauthiz
04-02-2007, 11:29 AM
FYI Nauthiz, the book i was reading was Pseudoscience and the Paranormal by Terence Hines

Sweet, it's at Sulzer.

I wish the Chicago public library had a reading list widget thing in their catalog. (In other words, every library system's website should be the one like they have in Madison. ;D )

The one that I mentioned is Bad Medicine by Christopher Wanjek. Unfortunately the only copy the chipublib has is categorized as a @#$@#% reference book. (As is, as far as I can tell, any book at the main branch that has anything to do with science. Their "science reference" section covers at least 1/4 of the nonfiction floor and is twice the size of my house!)

Dandelion
04-02-2007, 11:33 AM
Sweet, it's at Sulzer.

I wish the Chicago public library had a reading list widget thing in their catalog. (In other words, every library system's website should be the one like they have in Madison. ;D )

The one that I mentioned is Bad Medicine by Christopher Wanjek. Unfortunately the only copy the chipublib has is categorized as a @#$@#% reference book. (As is, as far as I can tell, any book at the main branch that has anything to do with science. Their "science reference" section covers at least 1/4 of the nonfiction floor and is twice the size of my house!)
yup, that's where i just returned it. man, you ARE a book nerd!
herbi and i are making our way through their stacks in lieu of TV.
I'll scope Bad Medicine, thanks.

nauthiz
04-02-2007, 11:37 AM
man, you ARE a book nerd!

It's bad.

Shion
04-02-2007, 01:55 PM
I'm reading Sister to the Dead by: Barb & J.C. Hendee, Golden Fool by: Robin Hobb, and Women of the Way: Discovering 2,500 years of Buddhist Wisdom by:Sallie Tisdale. I am almost done with the latter one. It has been really interesting. Although some of the situations women were put through really upset me:mad: so I take breaks from reading it from time to time.

nauthiz
04-02-2007, 02:37 PM
Women of the Way: Discovering 2,500 years of Buddhist Wisdom by:Sallie Tisdale. I am almost done with the latter one. It has been really interesting. Although some of the situations women were put through really upset me:mad: so I take breaks from reading it from time to time.

Did you see the last issue of Tricycle? They had some really interesting articles on the situation for women in Buddhism around the world.

SlightlySt00pid
04-02-2007, 08:49 PM
Currently halfway through On The Road by Jack Kerouac, and Brave New World by Aldous Huxley. Kind of an odd pair of books to be reading congruently, one being about getting out and exploring the countryside, the other about a not-too-distant future existence dominated by conformity and regulation.

rick green
04-02-2007, 10:54 PM
Epitaph of a Small Winner by Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis & The Poetry Home Repair Manual by Ted Kooser. Both are pretty good.

Shion
04-02-2007, 11:17 PM
Did you see the last issue of Tricycle? They had some really interesting articles on the situation for women in Buddhism around the world.

No, but I will probably go to the bookstore tomorrow, so I will look into it. thanks :)

Shion
04-02-2007, 11:19 PM
Currently halfway through On The Road by Jack Kerouac, and Brave New World by Aldous Huxley. Kind of an odd pair of books to be reading congruently, one being about getting out and exploring the countryside, the other about a not-too-distant future existence dominated by conformity and regulation.

I loved Brave New World.:smitten:

MercurialMary
04-03-2007, 06:35 PM
Now I've picked up the Plague Dogs by Richard Adams, after all the Watership Down talk over in the Movies thread. I first read this about 20+ years ago, but it's one I go back to again and again. One of my layers of paint, I guess.

Let's see how many other threads I can name drop... :rolleyes:

LazyGirl
04-03-2007, 08:58 PM
As usual, I have bookmarks in half a dozen books, mostly rereads. Two new ones that I am currently reading:

This Day in the Life: Diaries From Women Across America edited by Joni B. Cole, Rebecca Joffrey, and B.K. Rakhra - It's a collection of diary entries by women in all walks of life, all written on the same day - June 29, 2004. The women chronicled their lives for that 24-hour period. The entries are pretty diverse, funny, and surprisingly honest considering that real names, locations, and occupations are used. I'm about halfway through it (it's my lunch hour read) and I'm enjoying it immensely.

Burlesque and the Art of the Teese/Fetish and the Art of the Teese by Dita von Teese - Dita is one of my (many) guilty pleasures. This is a large, hardcover, full-color glossy photo book that is also part autobiography, part how-to (for those interested in a career in burlesque and/or fetish modeling), and part plea for a return to glamour. I will not be donning corsets or skyscraper heels anytime soon (ever), but I like to look at the pictures, and I like Dita*.

*I do wish, however, that I could find a vegan version of her. The furs and taxidermy can get to be a bit much.

rick green
04-09-2007, 11:37 PM
The End of Mr. Y by Scarlett Thomas.

Oh yeah.

veganshawn
04-09-2007, 11:45 PM
Over the last few weeks I have read:

Women and Hollywood - Charles Bukowski
Curse of Lono - Hunter S Thompson
And I am about halfway though Haunted by Chuck Palahniuk

Have Factotum by Charles Bukowski, Diary by Chuck Palahniuk and a book on the Clash called Last Gang in Town by Marcus Gray all to read after I am done with Haunted.

nauthiz
04-10-2007, 08:01 AM
The Djinn in the Nightingale's Eye was good. On a scale of get at bookstore, get at library, or get rid of, I'd say a strong get at library.

Next is The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie

It's my first Rushdie novel. I'm adoring his prose. Really dense, though. Possibly harder to read than Joyce. Not as bad as Pynchon. It's going to take me a while to get through this.

Flower
04-10-2007, 11:18 AM
Tonight I'm starting Lisey's Story by Stephen King. I hope I'm not disappointed.

mamaquilla
04-10-2007, 02:41 PM
I just finished Down and Dirty Birding by Joey Slinger - Funny, good info and an enjoyable read (Thanks Quagga :happy: )

Flower
04-10-2007, 03:13 PM
Miso- I got Misfortune, so it's my next book to read! :)

Vegtink
04-10-2007, 03:29 PM
I just finished Something Borrowed which made me read Something Blue. Now I am reading The Lovely Bones.

JasperKat
04-10-2007, 04:10 PM
Tonight I'm starting Lisey's Story by Stephen King. I hope I'm not disappointed.


Let me know what you think!


I just finished Something Borrowed which made me read Something Blue. Now I am reading The Lovely Bones.

My dad bought me this as a bday gift one year. It's not the sort of thing I'd normally read, but I liked it okay.

Right now I'm starting Afterwards You're a Genius.

-JK

Miso Vegan
04-10-2007, 06:38 PM
Miso- I got Misfortune, so it's my next book to read! :)

FINALLY someone to talk to about it!!!!

Jessica
04-10-2007, 06:56 PM
"Living alone & loving it. A guide to relishing the solo life" by Barbara Feldon

I'm not much of a reader as of late. So I just keep it in the bathroom. :silly:

rick green
04-10-2007, 08:39 PM
Margherita Dolce Vita by Stefano Benni

The first half is hilarious. I hope the second half isn't a let down.

stegan
04-12-2007, 07:59 AM
Kurt Vonnegut died yesterday. :( Times obituary here (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/12/books/12vonnegut.html?_r=2&hp&oref=slogin&oref=slogin).

What's your favorite Vonnegut book?

My vote is for "Cat's Cradle"- I've never read a more hilarious or accurate skewering of western religious culture.

ShackleMeNot
04-12-2007, 09:29 AM
Blackhawk Down - Mark Bowden

MercurialMary
04-12-2007, 09:19 PM
Naked Pictures Of Famous People - Jon Stewart

VegeTexan
04-12-2007, 09:39 PM
Kurt Vonnegut died yesterday. :( Times obituary here (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/12/books/12vonnegut.html?_r=2&hp&oref=slogin&oref=slogin).

What's your favorite Vonnegut book?

My vote is for "Cat's Cradle"- I've never read a more hilarious or accurate skewering of western religious culture.


I have mentioned one of his plays, Happy Birthday Wanda June, the other play I was involved with was Fortitude, a short Sci-Fi piece about modern science and the ability to keep the head of a patient alive. (think about a funny version of The Brain That Wouldn't Die.)

Slaughterhouse 5 and The Sirens of Titan were big favorites of mine. I almost bought his last book at the bookstore the other day, Timequake. I know I will get it now, and also re-read some of his other books and plays that played a part in my life.

superwife
04-13-2007, 03:19 PM
my dad (RIP) read me 'breakfast of champions' when i was a little kid. he figured i'd like it because it had pictures in it... even if one of the pictures was of a vagina.

my dad was kind of a hippie :)

rick green
04-13-2007, 05:17 PM
Hey, that was a beaver, not a vagina!

;)

vegankitty
04-13-2007, 11:03 PM
^^^ Total WTF moment!


I'm listening to How to Talk to a Liberal (If You Must) by Ann Coulter.It is as bloodboiling as might be expected.I like listening to conservatives , just so I can't be accused of having no knowledge of their actual words when I "talk" to them.

(It's an audiobook , so I thought I could put it here.)

hazelfaern
04-14-2007, 12:37 AM
Just finished The Permaculture Way by Graham Bell and started up Gaia: The Growth of an Idea

nauthiz
04-14-2007, 11:21 AM
I'm listening to How to Talk to a Liberal (If You Must) by Ann Coulter.It is as bloodboiling as might be expected.I like listening to conservatives , just so I can't be accused of having no knowledge of their actual words when I "talk" to them.

I spent some time reading her blog last night. It's getting very hard for me to believe that she's serious - I'm starting to half-believe the theory that she's secretly a radical leftist who says all this ridiculous crap to make conservatives look bad.

Mattitude
04-14-2007, 01:30 PM
I'm just finishing Dominion....what a great book covering many ethical and moral issues.

veganshawn
04-14-2007, 01:32 PM
Just finished Haunted by Chuck Palanhiuk (sp?) and I can't figure out if I really hated it or really loved it.

Flower
04-14-2007, 03:09 PM
Just finished Haunted by Chuck Palanhiuk (sp?) and I can't figure out if I really hated it or really loved it.

It was my least favorite of all his books, but I still liked it. :)

veganshawn
04-14-2007, 06:05 PM
It was my least favorite of all his books, but I still liked it. :)

yeah there where things that I thought where awesome about it, but some of the stuff just felt like he was trying to gross out for the sake of it. Plus I saw the ending a mile away.

What was your favorite? I have diary to read next.

sonicdish
04-14-2007, 08:53 PM
i went through a huge palahniuk phase for a while... then i started realizing that all his books are essentially the same... they're good nonetheless. since i've found some more contemporary authors that are better. has anyone read Nick Hornby? his novel "A Long Way Down" is phenomenal. so funny.

Flower
04-14-2007, 09:07 PM
yeah there where things that I thought where awesome about it, but some of the stuff just felt like he was trying to gross out for the sake of it. Plus I saw the ending a mile away.

What was your favorite? I have diary to read next.

Fight Club, but Survivor is a close second.

veganshawn
04-14-2007, 10:51 PM
i went through a huge palahniuk phase for a while... then i started realizing that all his books are essentially the same... they're good nonetheless. since i've found some more contemporary authors that are better. has anyone read Nick Hornby? his novel "A Long Way Down" is phenomenal. so funny.

Have not read his stuff. I will keep an eye out for his stuff.

vegankitty
04-15-2007, 11:21 AM
i went through a huge palahniuk phase for a while... then i started realizing that all his books are essentially the same... they're good nonetheless. since i've found some more contemporary authors that are better. has anyone read Nick Hornby? his novel "A Long Way Down" is phenomenal. so funny.

"How to Be Good" was the first book I read when I got clean.I also read "high Fidelity".

vegankitty
04-15-2007, 11:22 AM
Fight Club, but Survivor is a close second.

I haven't read "Fight Cub" yet , but I loved "Survivor".

veganshawn
04-15-2007, 11:23 AM
"How to Be Good" was the first book I read when I got clean.I also read "high Fidelity".

Wait I did read High Fidelity, it was really good.

vegankitty
04-15-2007, 11:29 AM
Nick Hornby also wrote "About a Boy" and "31 Songs" (about songs that are importnt to him for one reason , or another , though I thought it had another title.My copy is in storage.)I loved "about a Boy" , didn't finish the song one.I'm looking forward to the new one , mentioned above.(Logs off to head out to bookstore...):)

veganshawn
04-15-2007, 11:31 AM
Nick Hornby also wrote "About a Boy" and "31 Songs" (about songs that are importnt to him for one reason , or another , though I thought it had another title.My copy is in storage.)I loved "about a Boy" , didn't finish the song one.I'm looking forward to the new one , mentioned above.(Logs off to head out to bookstore...):)

I will put some of his other works on my library's hold list. :)

vegankitty
04-15-2007, 02:15 PM
I will put some of his other works on my library's hold list. :)

I need a library card.I got illegaly evicted in 2003 ; my landlord threw out all my stuff while I was away.I had ten libraray books , all hard cover and now I owe the library $300.

veganshawn
04-15-2007, 02:19 PM
I need a library card.I got illegaly evicted in 2003 ; my landlord threw out all my stuff while I was away.I had ten libraray books , all hard cover and now I owe the library $300.


That sucks!!! If it wasn't for the library I wouldn't read as much as I do, though yesterday at the thrift store I found some good books. I also get CD's from the library.

Flower
04-15-2007, 02:21 PM
That does suck, vegankitty. :(

I'll be checking out Hornby's stuff as soon as I'm through the next two books I've got right now. I need a new author to read, so thanks, sonicdish!:)

mamaquilla
04-15-2007, 02:23 PM
Im 2/3 thru Mindless Eating - Why We Eat More Than We Think by Brian Wansink, Ph.D - a food pychologist/researcher.

Very interesting, refer's to numerous studies that he has been a part of.

Miso Vegan
04-16-2007, 01:47 PM
Miso- I got Misfortune, so it's my next book to read! :)
I'm waaaaaaiiiiiiiitiiiiiiing........

:silly:

Flower
04-16-2007, 02:14 PM
I'm waaaaaaiiiiiiiitiiiiiiing........

:silly:

I kind of started Lisey's Story, but now I'm really tempted to put it off & read Misfortune instead.... :D

MercurialMary
04-16-2007, 04:52 PM
Eat, Pray, Love (http://www.elizabethgilbert.com/eatpraylove.htm) by Elizabeth Gilbert - good so far. The author is witty, although not too annoyingly.

The downside is I keep thinking of Melissa Gilbert, which is distracting. Half Pint! :silly:

vegankitty
04-17-2007, 06:22 PM
Eat, Pray, Love (http://www.elizabethgilbert.com/eatpraylove.htm) by Elizabeth Gilbert - good so far. The author is witty, although not too annoyingly.

The downside is I keep thinking of Melissa Gilbert, which is distracting. Half Pint! :silly:

You like it?I have it in my pile of books to read.(Which is ever increasing.I think I have a years worth of books.)

Currently I'm reading The Secret Supper by Javier Sierra.It was a best seller in Spain.It's a DaVinci Code type book about DaVinci's The Last Supper and the symbols he put in it , set while he was painting it.I like it , but I'm a fan of historical mysteries.My boyfriend found it boring.Anyone interested pm me and I'll mail it to you,I need to get rid of books when I'm done with them.All AR titles go in my library but I pass on most fiction.I used to give my old books to a homeless guy who sold books , but he's disappeared.

mamaquilla
04-17-2007, 06:59 PM
I really enjoyed Eat, Love, Pray, like not put down till read the whole thing enjoyed :happy:

MercurialMary
04-17-2007, 08:16 PM
I really enjoyed Eat, Love, Pray, like not put down till read the whole thing enjoyed :happy:

I'm at that point right now, but the brownies were done and I had to get up from the couch. ;)
I'm in the India chapters now....

I really like this book

vegankitty
04-17-2007, 08:22 PM
I'm at that point right now, but the brownies were done and I had to get up from the couch. ;)
I'm in the India chapters now....

I really like this book

*bumped to top of pille*

veganshawn
04-20-2007, 03:19 PM
Starting Diary by Chuck Palunik (sp?). Just finished Factotum by Charles Bukowski, which is by far one of my favorites of his.

MercurialMary
04-21-2007, 06:34 PM
Savage Beauty: The Life of Edna St. Vincent Millay by Nancy Milford

Dandelion
04-23-2007, 02:39 AM
i'm finally getting around to knocking books off my list. two that i bumped to the top were the ones i kept hearing omnis mention to me: Omnivore's Dilemma and The China Study. Instead of chasing them down from the library i ended up just buying them. The others are Francione's Rain Without Thunder and Introduction to Animal Rights.

I just finished Omnivore's Dilemma and Rain Without Thunder before that. Last week i was abolitionist and this week i'm an omni again. ;) Seriously though everything i thought about veganism, animal rights and welfare is completely out the window and i'm rebuilding my position from the ground up. I think i got a bit complacent over the years and this was long overdue. unfortunately it's at a time my professional life is also being challenged so i'm in crisis mode all around.

i would like to make a complete review of these texts at some point but i'm still digesting alot and i'd like to read Introduction to Animal Rights for a well rounded view of Francione.

I wish book club threads would work out better.

Drew!
04-23-2007, 02:44 AM
The others are Francione's Rain Without Thunder and Introduction to Animal Rights.

How is Francione? I'm reading Animal Liberation right now, and I totally agree with his "equal consideration of interests" bit but utilitarianism doesn't leave me satisfied. That might be a emotional response to some hard questions though.

Dandelion
04-23-2007, 03:45 AM
How is Francione? I'm reading Animal Liberation right now, and I totally agree with his "equal consideration of interests" bit but utilitarianism doesn't leave me satisfied. That might be a emotional response to some hard questions though.
I'll have a better feel for Francione when i finish Introduction to Animal Rights. His language is quite academic (for my wittle brayne) so it's slow digestin'. :) :zombie: :drool:

LazyGirl
04-24-2007, 10:50 AM
I just finished Unjobbing by Michael Fogler. There was nothing in it that I had not already heard before or believe myself, but it was a fresh perspective. I'm embarking on a complete restructuring of my life, and this is just the type of book I need to spur me on.

I'm also almost done with How to Live Well Without Owning a Car (http://www.amazon.com/How-Live-Well-Without-Owning/dp/1580087574). All I can say is, "Wow". I am actually starting to believe that a car-free (or at least car-lite) life may be possible for me - right where I am. What I like most about the book is that the author lays out a step-by-step plan for helping you evaluate your various transportation options for specific situations. Also, I like that the author is a regular person who stumbled onto car-free living by accident. Sometimes I get tired of reading certain kinds of books that are written by um, people whose lifestyles are vastly different from mine. :) Anyway, I encourage everyone to read this book. I was able to find it at my library, which was quite a surprise considering that this has got to be one of the car-lovingest cities in the U.S.

nauthiz
04-24-2007, 10:56 AM
Wow, that's awesome, LazyGirl. Going voluntarily car-free in Memphis is something that never would have occurred to me.

jeezycreezy
04-24-2007, 11:35 AM
I got about half way through The Alphabet of Manliness by Maddox before giving up.

Here is my review:

A is for asshole.

B is for boring.

C through Z: This book sucks.

His webpage used to be amusing when he actually wrote **** for it with any degree of frequency. But this book is essentially one sophomoric joke stretched out over 200 pages, about 175 of them being badly drawn illustrations.

LazyGirl
04-24-2007, 12:24 PM
Wow, that's awesome, LazyGirl. Going voluntarily car-free in Memphis is something that never would have occurred to me.

Yeah, me neither. I credit this book for my recent mental shift. I feel that I can relate to the author, which really helps. He lives in St. Louis which, while smaller than Memphis, has a fairly similar feel and culture to it.

nauthiz
04-24-2007, 01:01 PM
Just out of curiosity, what part of Memphis do you live in?

LazyGirl
04-24-2007, 03:09 PM
Southeast, at the city limits (we were annexed the year after I bought my house); the area is known as Hickory Hill

MercurialMary
04-24-2007, 03:34 PM
Southeast, at the city limits (we were annexed the year after I bought my house); the area is known as Hickory Hill

Hey, LazyGirl - ever been to Olive Branch, MS? I grew up there a million years ago...
did I already ask you this?

*completely off topic*

Miso Vegan
04-24-2007, 04:54 PM
I just finished Omnivore's Dilemma and Rain Without Thunder before that. Last week i was abolitionist and this week i'm an omni again. ;) Seriously though everything i thought about veganism, animal rights and welfare is completely out the window and i'm rebuilding my position from the ground up. I think i got a bit complacent over the years and this was long overdue. unfortunately it's at a time my professional life is also being challenged so i'm in crisis mode all around.
Good luck getting through this period, Dandelion. I look forward to hearing more of your thoughts on the above.

Dandelion
04-24-2007, 05:29 PM
Good luck getting through this period, Dandelion. I look forward to hearing more of your thoughts on the above.
thanks Miso Vegan, i plan on comprehensive posts coming up. That is, if there's a VRF left. ;)

rick green
04-24-2007, 05:51 PM
Yeah, me too. (What Miso Vegan said.)

bluedawg
04-24-2007, 06:07 PM
That is, if there's a VRF left. ;)
i was already insanely curious about your new thoughts after the first post, but now this REALLY has me on the edge of my seat!

rick green
04-24-2007, 06:17 PM
Hey yeah! What are you trying to say ?

pink.apple
04-24-2007, 06:23 PM
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

LazyGirl
04-24-2007, 06:43 PM
Hey, LazyGirl - ever been to Olive Branch, MS?

Olive Branch is just a few streets over. I went to a pool party at a friend's house there once, but that's about it. :)


That is, if there's a VRF left.

What's that supposed to mean, mister??? :mad:

gladcow
04-24-2007, 06:57 PM
That is, if there's a VRF left. ;)
*banned*

JasperKat
05-01-2007, 03:33 PM
I just started "Deconstructing Tyrone; A new look at black masculinity in the hip-hop generation". The first chapter is about Detroit and mayor Kwame Kilpatrick, so I'm hooked! I think he's so interesting.


-JK

quagga
05-01-2007, 03:49 PM
I just finished Unjobbing by Michael Fogler. There was nothing in it that I had not already heard before or believe myself, but it was a fresh perspective. I'm embarking on a complete restructuring of my life, and this is just the type of book I need to spur me on.

LazyGirl, I remember from the Christmas swap thread that you received a copy of The Lifelong Activist. (http://www.amazon.com/Lifelong-Activist-Change-Without-Losing/dp/1590560906/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/002-7325654-7280847?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1178052262&sr=8-1) Have you started to work through this? I'm thinking about using this book as a tool to deal with some frustrations that I'm experiencing. I listened to an interview with the author on an Animal Voices podcast and was intrigued.

Has anyone else used this book?

rick green
05-01-2007, 04:19 PM
Holy Cow: The Hare Krishna Contribution to Vegetarianism & Animal Rights
also
Krishna: The Beautiful Legend of God (Srimad Bhagavata Book X)

It's a full on Krishna-fest over here.

Miso Vegan
05-02-2007, 11:51 PM
I kind of started Lisey's Story, but now I'm really tempted to put it off & read Misfortune instead.... :D
:tapping foot:

Flower
05-03-2007, 07:06 AM
:tapping foot:

I was just coming in this thread to write a post to you! :silly:

I'm really dragging my feet on reading Lisey's Story. I'm only halfway through on it & should really be done with it by now. Misfortune is sitting on my bookshelf in the sunroom, so everytime I go back there I feel panicky.

I'm gonna kick myself in gear & finish with Lisey's Story so I can start it very soon!

Miso Vegan
05-03-2007, 09:43 AM
ok, well, I'll just be sittin' here, waiting....

;)

Shion
05-03-2007, 12:10 PM
I'm reading The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien for the fifth time and Empire by: Orson Scott Card.

VegeTexan
05-03-2007, 12:40 PM
I'm in the middle of A Dirty Job, by Christopher Moore. I like his sense of humor. I read Bloodsucking Fiends, because gladcow mentioned it here and I got hooked on Moore.

rick green
05-05-2007, 01:25 AM
All that Hare Krishna stuff went on hold so I could finish a truly great book: Waiting for the Barbarians by J.M. Coetzee. If only Dick Cheney would read it. Now I'm into Slow Man by the same author. Should be a good weekend. :)

attackferret
05-05-2007, 11:45 PM
Ooh, I started Waiting for the Barbarians a few months ago and then got distracted before I truly got into it. I need to pick it up again.

Today I actually pushed through and read Another Bullshit Night in Suck City by Nick Flynn. His background is more in poetry than in prose, so his writing drove me nuts sometime, but the content could not fail to be fascinating. I highly recommend this book, especially to anyone who has ever worked with the homeless.

Is anyone here on goodreads (http://www.goodreads.com/)? It's a book review site where you can rate books, review them, and look at what your friends are reading/have read. I just signed up a few days ago, and I'm having fun with it. If you want to be my friend, pm me for my e-mail address!

rick green
05-06-2007, 02:06 AM
I hope you like waiting for the barbarians if you go back to it. Goodreads, eh? I signed up as rick_green. Might be fun.

LazyGirl
05-06-2007, 08:44 AM
LazyGirl, I remember from the Christmas swap thread that you received a copy of The Lifelong Activist. (http://www.amazon.com/Lifelong-Activist-Change-Without-Losing/dp/1590560906/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/002-7325654-7280847?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1178052262&sr=8-1) Have you started to work through this? I'm thinking about using this book as a tool to deal with some frustrations that I'm experiencing. I listened to an interview with the author on an Animal Voices podcast and was intrigued.

Has anyone else used this book?

As with most books like this, I read through without actually doing the action steps or asking myself the tough questions. I always mean to do it "when I really have time to really do it right". :rolleyes:

I'm glad that you mentioned it and reminded me of this book. I think that now would be a good time for me to reread it again, since I'm already in a "life reengineering" phase anyway. I think I am ready for it this time. I've decided what I don't want to do with my life (what I'm doing now); the hard part is figuring out what I want to do. I know that I want to make a difference in the world, but I'm having a hard time trying to decide where to focus my energies.

Didn't VRF have book disccusion threads for specific books? Would it be worthwhile to have one for this one?

Miso Vegan
05-06-2007, 10:56 AM
As with most books like this, I read through without actually doing the action steps or asking myself the tough questions. I always mean to do it "when I really have time to really do it right". :rolleyes:

That is exactly what I do. I did that most recently with a book about stuff (as in clutter). "I'll just read through the book first, then do the 'work' questions when I have time to really think about them...."

veganshawn
05-06-2007, 10:58 AM
A man with out a country - Kurt Vonnegut

And I just finished Hell's Angels by Sonny Barger really good read, to bad vegans couldn't shake things up like the Hell Angles did in their prime.

rick green
05-08-2007, 09:26 PM
Sacred Hunger by Barry Unsworth.

Slow Man was great (I thought). It was all:

http://images.art.com/images/products/large/10091000/10091045.jpg

Cool. :cool:

Flower
05-09-2007, 07:58 PM
JasperKat- I just (finally) finished Lisey's Story today. I was disappointed. During the beginning of the book, I almost stopped reading it a few times, but I kept plugging on hoping that there would eventually be more to it. By the time I realized there wasn't going to be more, I was just about done with it, anyway, so I decided I might as well finish it. meh

Miso- guess what book I'm going to start now!

I know, it certainly took me long enough!!

Miso Vegan
05-09-2007, 08:01 PM
:sweat:

Thanks for letting me know - I was starting to hyperventilate. :silly:

Flower
05-09-2007, 08:06 PM
:sweat:

Thanks for letting me know - I was starting to hyperventilate. :silly:

I was really starting to worry that I'd never finish Lisey's Story. It was such a slow read!

Shion
05-09-2007, 10:41 PM
Finished, Empire a great sci fi read. I have to say Torrent is my hero.

I am moving on in my stack. I am reading 100 Short Stories by Ray Bradbury and Fools Fate.

calendar
05-10-2007, 08:44 AM
Started yesterday, am halfway through Margaret Atwood's "The Robber Bride."

She's very gifted. All of her works are different. I preferred Oryx and Crake, though.

There is some veg-friendly sentiment in both of these.

MercurialMary
05-10-2007, 01:21 PM
Started yesterday, am halfway through Margaret Atwood's "The Robber Bride."

She's very gifted. All of her works are different. I preferred Oryx and Crake, though.

There is some veg-friendly sentiment in both of these.


Oh, I loved The Robber Bride, one of my favorites ever. I picked up the habit of saying/reading/thinking words backwards from that book...

rick green
05-12-2007, 11:07 PM
Is The Great Gatsby all it's cracked up to be?
I just read it and thought it was good, but no masterpiece.
And I can't tell if that's an honest judgement or a bit of knee-jerk iconoclasm.
Why has it accumulated so much mystique?
Are there any Gatsby-philes in the house?
Please explain it to me.

hazelfaern
05-12-2007, 11:17 PM
Is The Great Gatsby all it's cracked up to be?
I just read it and thought it was good, but no masterpiece.
And I can't tell if that's an honest judgement or a bit of knee-jerk iconoclasm.
Why has it accumulated so much mystique?
Are there any Gatsby-philes in the house?
Please explain it to me.

Where's Grog?

rick green
05-12-2007, 11:18 PM
West Egg?

hazelfaern
05-12-2007, 11:29 PM
West Egg?

What?

rick green
05-12-2007, 11:37 PM
Sorry, it's from the book. Is grog a fan or something?

hazelfaern
05-12-2007, 11:45 PM
Sorry, it's from the book. Is grog a fan or something?

I thought so. I'm certain he's quoted a few paragraphs from it. But I can't seem to find those references at the moment.

My boyfriend says that it's the quintessential American novel -- and that it's very much the 1920's Americanized version of Barry Lyndon.

Also, that it's not uncommon for readers to dismiss the book as lightweight or superficial or not all that the first time around. Appearantly, a female reader remarked to Fitzgerald that Gatsby was the sort of book she might read while standing in line to wait for a movie. But he (boyfriend) said it becomes a much more substantial book by the 2nd, 3rd and 4th readings.

That's all I got, though, since I haven't read the book myself.

rick green
05-13-2007, 12:04 AM
I see. I'll have to give it a second (or third) chance.
Barry Lyndon: never read the book, saw the movie, but I can't remember what happened. Which is good I suppose... now I can enjoy the book without preconceptions!
I didn't find Gatsby superficial, although it is light in good way--it's an easy read.
I reckon your boyfriend is a right knowledgeable fellow.
Thanks!

Miso Vegan
05-14-2007, 12:10 AM
If it doesn't grab me the first time, I won't give a book a second chance. Maybe it'd be my loss, but there are too many good books out there to waste my time like that. Seriously, even if it's a great example of its ____ (genre, time, author's talent), that doesn't mean no other good book will fill that role.

Will my life be enriched if I tried to read Moby Dick again? perhaps. Will I be a better person if I slog through Grapes of Wrath again? could be. It's fair to say that they left me flat because I didn't extract from them all the messages I could or understand all the layers of craft they contain, but I don't care - I gave them what I was willing to give them, I will not read them again.

Flower
05-14-2007, 05:04 AM
If it doesn't grab me the first time, I won't give a book a second chance. Maybe it'd be my loss, but there are too many good books out there to waste my time like that. Seriously, even if it's a great example of its ____ (genre, time, author's talent), that doesn't mean no other good book will fill that role.

Will my life be enriched if I tried to read Moby Dick again? perhaps. Will I be a better person if I slog through Grapes of Wrath again? could be. It's fair to say that they left me flat because I didn't extract from them all the messages I could or understand all the layers of craft they contain, but I don't care - I gave them what I was willing to give them, I will not read them again.

That's how I feel. There are actually very few books that I've read more than once, compared to all of the books that I wouldn't read again.

Speaking of books, I long for a day when I can just read outside on the deck in my lounge chair allllll day long. :)

veganshawn
05-15-2007, 11:18 PM
Tried to read a book on the Clash but it was to long winded and text book like. Now I am reading Long Way Down by Nick Hornsby (thanks to who recommended it, I can't remember whom).

nymphetamine
05-15-2007, 11:20 PM
I am reading "Neither Man Nor Beast" by Carol J Adams. About Feminism and the Defence of Animals. An AMAZING book. One of the best I've ever read. It's soooo intense I can't read much at a time, I need to stop and soak it in. 12 stars out of 10.

mamaquilla
05-16-2007, 05:19 PM
The Good Good Pig by Sy Montgomery

So so so so good, inspiring, uplifting, warm hearted, thoughtful, thougth provoking, good good read :D