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02-17-2006, 06:31 PM
This week from the library:

Pamela Rice's 101 reasons book: it's outstanding, but depressing.
Jane Goodall's Harvest for Hope
Chomsky on Anarchism
A Scott Nearing Reader

oldradical
02-17-2006, 06:41 PM
smarty

pants :)

oldradical
02-23-2006, 06:22 PM
Three more:

Encountering Kali: In the margins, at the center, in the west. Riachel Fell McDermott and Jeffrey J. Kripal, Eds. U of Cal Press, 2003.

Open Minded: Working Out the Logic of the Soul, by Jonathan Lear. Harvard U Press, 1998.

Sartre and Camus: A Historic Confrontation. David A. Sprintzen and Adrian van den Hoven, Eds. Humanity Books, 2004.

This makes eight books I'm currently reading, and the great part is that every one of them is interesting and worthwhile. Yippee!

grog
02-23-2006, 07:54 PM
my great aunt, who was brilliant, would read two books at a time. She'd put them on a reading rack and read one page on one book, and the read the pages on the other book, then flip them both. Maybe you should try that.

oldradical
02-23-2006, 08:11 PM
my great aunt, who was brilliant, would read two books at a time. She'd put them on a reading rack and read one page on one book, and the read the pages on the other book, then flip them both. Maybe you should try that.

You're just trying to get me to flip.

Too late, bub. :cartwheel: :kiss:

Emiloid
02-25-2006, 08:57 PM
I like to have a large pool of books to read as well. I really should be reading my textbooks, but... I'm also reading:

Waste and Want: a Social History of Trash by Susan Strasser
Crispin the Cross of Lead by Avi (that's the author's whole name!)
Crispin won the Newberry Medal in 2002.

OK, I'm really just browsing these:
Edible and Useful Plants of California (borrowed from quagga--thanks quagga!)
Square Foot Gardening by Mel Bartholomew

Yup, lots of fun stuff!

bluedawg
02-26-2006, 03:20 PM
i recently finished think like a cat: how to raise a well-adjusted cat--not a sourpuss by pam johnson-bennett. it was pretty good in spots, boring in others, and took me a long time to get through (because i didn't care much due to the boring parts). i'm thinking of reading her cat vs. cat: keeping peace when you have more than one cat next, but i'm not sure.

right now i'm reading the second summer of the sisterhood (i.e., of the traveling pants variety) by ann brashares. i thought the first one was cute, so i decided to keep reading 'em. :) i read almost 300 pages yesterday, i imagine i'll finish it today or tomorrow. yay for purely-leisure reading!

dann
02-26-2006, 10:21 PM
Das Unbehagen in der Kultur - Siggie (Sigmund Freud)
OK, I admit it:
Civilization and its Discontents (I'm reading the English version too to be sure I know what the heck is going on)
Why Marriage?: The History Shaping Today's Debate Over Gay Equality - George Chauncey
Turkish Culture in German Society Today - David Horrocks and Eva Kolinsky

oldradical
02-26-2006, 11:44 PM
I'm envious that you can read Freud in the original. Then, I feel the same way about Nietzsche, Heidegger, and a few others. Oh well.

MissLovely
02-27-2006, 09:33 AM
I'm reading We Thought You Would Be Prettier By Laurie Notaro
And Love and Logic which is a parenting book, that has some pretty cool techniques. I'm also reading a lot of paperwork. :)

gladcow
02-27-2006, 10:23 AM
Love and Other Impossible Pursuits - Ayelet Waldman

I love this book...

kikkert
02-27-2006, 10:52 AM
Promise to the Land: Essays on Rural Women by Joan Jensen This is turning out to be a depressing read. White folk have done horrible things to others (and each other) in the name of spreading their faith/beliefs/social expectations. I've known about gentrification and homogenization for years because of what I have read and studied as a student. But now I am finally getting the female perspective, which helps put everything else into context.

Money, greed, efficiency, "the right way to do things," gender defined roles, eliminating spiritual traditions...... I hope this collection takes an upturn by the end because itís not feeling very empowering at the moment.

carnelian
02-27-2006, 11:56 AM
Changing Minds by Howard Gardner

JasperKat
02-27-2006, 06:09 PM
Love and Other Impossible Pursuits - Ayelet Waldman

I love this book...


I recently read a review of this book. I wish I could remember where :p I thought it sounded good at the time. What's it about?

-JK

gladcow
02-27-2006, 06:18 PM
I recently read a review of this book. I wish I could remember where :p I thought it sounded good at the time. What's it about?

-JK
It's about a woman who has a baby that dies of SIDS and her life after. Man, that sounds bland. There is more, but I'm not sure how much to say, since part of the pace of the book is finding out this woman's back story. I just love Ayelet Waldman, her writing is excellent and I think she explores aspects of motherhood that most people avoid.

JasperKat
02-27-2006, 06:24 PM
That doesn't sound bland, it sounds heartwrenching! Maybe I'll wait on it, I've been reading a lot of "bummer books" lately and I need something lighthearted right now.

-JK

dropscone
02-28-2006, 02:35 PM
I just finished The Feast of Love by Charles Baxter which I enjoyed - it's got stories of people's experiences of great love, told to an insomniac novelist, and I like the way it represents different people's experiences of the same events without them invalidating each other.

Now reading Tales from the Torrid Zone by Alexander Frater - a travellogue/memoir kind of thing, making me feel warm to get me through a British February/March :)

mishka
02-28-2006, 03:55 PM
I spend way too much time reading blogs and posts and not enough time reading books.

I am currently (still) reading Son of a Witch.. started it early January. Sad, innit?

Next year I'll get around to reading Blink (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0316172324/qid=1141163676/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/103-1736154-5323003?s=books&v=glance&n=283155). :rolleyes:

gkleinman
03-12-2006, 01:22 AM
Just finished - Another Bullshit Night in Suck City: A Memoir by Nick Flynn

Really enjoyed it..

oldradical
03-12-2006, 09:55 AM
Narcissus and Goldmund, by Hermann Hesse. Been a long time since I read anything by Hesse, an author who was important to me when I was still a teenager and especially when I was a hippie.

apples_for_eva
03-12-2006, 10:56 AM
old macdonalds factory farm by c david coats

skyfall by catherine asaro
she's a pretty good sci-fi author, i'm sucked into the skolian empire series...

gur
03-17-2006, 09:27 AM
i finished a million little pieces and my friend leonard by james frey this week. i was number 500 and something on the waiting list at the library for million little pieces - it took forever to get and when my turn finally arrived, i'd heard everything there is to know about it so i was naturally disappointed in the read, even though i tried going in with a clear mind. however, my friend leonard was great. it made me cry, even. :p and i can't stop thinking about it - not because it was such a GREAT book, but because i'd come to know the characters and i miss them now. ha...

i'm also trudging through dominion, but that belongs in another thread. :p

atouria
03-17-2006, 11:34 AM
I'm reading Mad Cowboy and currently working on Food Revolution. It's nice to see some of the opinions AND facts echoing each other. It helps things stick to my memory better that way. :)

oldradical
03-18-2006, 06:41 PM
I mentioned a few posts back that I was reading Hermann Hesse's book, Narcissus and Goldmund. This is an extract from it:

He loitered around the fountain at the fish market and watched the fish venders and their burly wives praise their wares, watched them pull the cool silvery fish out of the barrels and offer them for sale, saw the fish open their mouths in pain, their gold eyes rigid with fear as they quietly gave in to death, or resisted it with furious desperation. He was gripped by pity for these animals and by a sad annoyance with human beings. Why were people so numb and crude, so unthinkably stupid and insensitive. How could those fishermen and fishwives, those haggling shoppers not see these mouths, the deathly frightened eyes and wildly flailing tails, the gruesome, useless, desperate battle, this unbearable transformation from mysterious, miraculously beautiful animals--the quiet last shiver that ran across the dying skin before they lay dead and spent--into flattened, miserable slabs of meat for the tables of those jovial paunches? These people saw nothing, knew nothing, and noticed nothing; nothing touched them.

Grey
03-18-2006, 09:27 PM
I'm not reading anything currently but, I ABSOLUTELY LOVE to read !! I feel like I don't have enough time for it. I read Animal Farm. I have like 3 copies of it somewhere in my room. Lol. There's a movie too. We watched it at school in 10th grade & I've rented it. When the horse went to the glue factory, I cried at school. I was the only one crying. I feel people my age have no respect or feelings for animals AT ALL.

VegeTexan
03-18-2006, 09:33 PM
The last few months I've been catching up on Dean Koontz books I hadn't read. Just finished "One Door Away From Heaven." A bit odd in that there is a drug addict who is a vegetarian. Her husband is the villian of the book and his philosophy is compared to some ideas of Peter Singer.
However, dogs play an important part in the salvation of humanity.
Koontz has always been good with dog stories, too bad he isn't more vegan friendly.

LazyGirl
03-19-2006, 08:46 AM
I'm currently reading My World of Astrology by Sydney Omarr. I think it's a pretty interesting read, no matter how you feel about astrology. I'm probably biased, though - I'm giving serious consideration to getting certified through the American Federation of Astrologers (don't y'all laugh at me! :) ). Then, I could work the fair/festival circuit with a two-for-one deal: bellydancing and astrology readings! :D

I'm also still trying to work my way through The World Peace Diet. I really can't seem to get into this book at all. I'm still on page 42 after having started this book months ago. It's funny because, in theory, this should be the kind of book that I love. In actuality, this book is not holding my interest at all. Maybe I should just put it down entirely and try again some other time.

grog
03-19-2006, 11:25 AM
I'm also still trying to work my way through The World Peace Diet. I really can't seem to get into this book at all. I'm still on page 42 after having started this book months ago.

Interesting, we are going to put that on our book list on our website, based on some recomendations. I haven't read it myself. I checked out the website (http://willtuttle.com/WPD.htm) and it seemed a little....holistic for my taste. I probably agree with all the points, just not the presentation.

petaske'kwe'
03-19-2006, 05:08 PM
I finished The Mystery of Edwin Drood by Charles Dickens last night and I'm looking at my bookcase right now deciding what to read next.

I've read of few pages each of:

La Reine Margot by Alexander Dumas
Lorna Doone by R.D. Blackmore
Ben Hur by Lew Wallace

but I couldn't really get into any of them. The print was really small in the first two (annoying!) and the third one wasn't really my style. Too esoteric and religious. But I'll probably get around to reading all three before I make another trip to the used book store.

So...maybe Shirley by Charlotte Bronte or Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift?

apples_for_eva
03-20-2006, 11:28 AM
HOLY SH**!! i just finished empty cages by tom regan, and i feel like i've been living somewhere else entirely!! the animal testing & rodeo bits left me literally sick to my stomach!! and the zoo animals!! and the animal dealers!! i think i'm going to have nightmares about someone kidnapping my cat now!! i can't stop exclaiming about it!! i'm not buying products ever again that i don't know weren't tested on animals!!

MissLovely
03-20-2006, 11:31 AM
Word Freak Stefan Fatsis

gladcow
03-20-2006, 11:38 AM
Word Freak Stefan Fatsis
yep. you're my (third) soulmate. :happy:

attackferret
03-24-2006, 08:30 PM
Don't Be Afraid, Gringo, translated/edited by Medea Benjamin, told by Elvia Alvarado. Excellent book, really interesting to hear about decades of the farmer/peasant struggle of Honduras as told by an activist. The caveat is that it's 20 years dated - I read it right before going to Honduras, and what I saw was nothing like what was described in the book. Then again, I did not get a chance to go deep into the mountains where the most extreme poverty exists.

There are Mountains to Climb by Jean Deeds. A woman's travelogue of hiking the AT. She hadn't really done any backpacking before and she had bad knees, but at 52 she felt driven to thru-hike the AT. And she pretty much did (she broke her ankle, so she had to finish maine the next year). For some reason the back of the book says it's self-help... I can only assume that's because along with her physical journey, she catalogues her mental transformation as well. Very interesting book for anyone interested in what it's like to hike the AT, especially as a solo woman.

Tracy G
04-09-2006, 10:33 AM
Altered Art: Techniques for Creating Altered Books, Boxes, Cards & More by Terry Taylor. The cover of this book caught my eye at the library. It features a number of intriguing projects, and is creating quite an itch for me to create some new assemblages and collages.

FarmerStephen
04-09-2006, 04:03 PM
Mycelium Running
How Mushrooms Can Help Save the World (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1580085792/sr=8-1/qid=1144616456/ref=pd_bbs_1/002-9041326-8076801?%5Fencoding=UTF8)
by Paul Staments

Highly recomended for any other botany geeks out there.......:thumbsup:

oldradical
04-09-2006, 04:49 PM
Is The Goddess A Feminist? The Politics of South Asian Goddesses. A. Hiltebeitel & K. M. Erndl, Eds. NYU Press, New York, 2000. I'm finding this most interesting and useful in its situating of Tantra vis-a-vis the dominant Hindu paradigm. I've long been aware that Tantra is a school of philosophical and religious thought, as well as practice...not at all the thing you typically find advertised on the internet. Its gynofilic and gynocentric stance fits perfectly with my "take" on Wicca, as does its emphasis upon immanence rather than transcendence. Unsurprisingly, therefore, Tantra does not denigrate the world as "maya," something to be subdued, shunned, and overcome...but, instead, understood, embraced, and loved. I can see why and how the lady who founded the Sha'can spiritual tradition was already both a Wiccan priestess and a Tantric adept.

dann
04-10-2006, 06:40 PM
I'm envious that you can read Freud in the original. Then, I feel the same way about Nietzsche, Heidegger, and a few others. Oh well.

Nietzsche and Freud are both great in the original because the German language does things that cannot be done in English. I've never read any Heidegger, so I don't know about him. Nietzsche does some great things with the words.

chikara_no_tori
04-10-2006, 06:49 PM
Chikara: "The Sexual Politics of Meat" (something I've wanted to read for quite some time now)

Amara (the Vegan in training): "Sparkle's in the Dark"...why? Because you can never have enough pop-up books when you're 2 years old.

dann
04-11-2006, 09:36 AM
From Nuremberg to the Hague - Philippe Sands, ed.
The Nuremberg Trials in International Law - Robert K. Woetzel
AfrikaBilder - don't know the editor 'cuz my copy is just a photocopy...
An Elephant's Life - PeTA (OK, I've already read it, but there is a copy in my bag today that will find a home on the Chicago Transit Authority somewhere prolly tomorrow morning)

MissLovely
04-11-2006, 10:10 AM
Inconsolable by Marrit Ingman

atouria
04-11-2006, 10:52 AM
No More Bull by Howard Lyman

And I've been doing Sudoku puzzles like it's going out of style. :rolleyes:

apples_for_eva
04-15-2006, 04:37 PM
the final key by katherine asaro. i requested it weeks ago, and it's finally here!

quagga
04-15-2006, 05:00 PM
Just finished The Golden Compass, book one of the His Dark Materials trilogy by Philip Pullman. I read a review of the trilogy in The New Yorker a couple of months ago, so I thought I'd give it a try. The review contrasted this trilogy with the latent Christian messages in The Lord of the Rings and The Chronicles of Narnia. In my opinion, just as you can read Narnia without being aware of the Christian context (which is what I did when I was a kid), you can do the same with this Pullman book--that is, you can read it without being aware that he is trying to take a science and rationalism approach to...um...fantasy.

The most interesting thing about the world that Pullman has created is that all humans have an animal counterpart, a daemon, that accompanies them throughout life. When you are a child, this daemon can change into different forms - bat, badger, mouse, moth, ermine, cat, tiger, sparrow, etc. If you are a boy, then your daemon is almost always female; if you are a girl, your daemon is almost always male. When you reach puberty, your daemon settles into one form or another. To me that was the most intriguing part. If I had read this book when I was young, I am sure that I would have obsessed over the idea of having a daemon. Some creatures in Pullman's world do not have daemons, and they are perceived by the young heroine as very lonely and cold beings.

I am sure that if I had a daemon, it would be in the form of a cat. No, wait, that is my waking life!

dann
04-15-2006, 07:56 PM
My bills.

Well, they sorta' make a book.

Tracy G
04-24-2006, 10:26 PM
Just finished reading a cute book called Airstream Living by Bruce Littlefield and Simon Brown. Makes me want to sell my house and wander about with a little trailer in tow.

kikkert
05-11-2006, 10:00 AM
At the recommendation of several people on VRF, I bought Becoming Vegan for myself as a refresher and for my SO for all his questions. It was quite a sound purchase.

At my SO's recommendation, I also started reading The Creature from Jekyll Island: A Second Look at the Federal Reserve, by G. Edward Griffin. It's utterly fascinating.

girlfallingdown
05-11-2006, 11:49 AM
Just finished The Golden Compass, book one of the His Dark Materials trilogy by Philip Pullman. I read a review of the trilogy in The New Yorker a couple of months ago, so I thought I'd give it a try. The review contrasted this trilogy with the latent Christian messages in The Lord of the Rings and The Chronicles of Narnia. In my opinion, just as you can read Narnia without being aware of the Christian context (which is what I did when I was a kid), you can do the same with this Pullman book--that is, you can read it without being aware that he is trying to take a science and rationalism approach to...um...fantasy.

The most interesting thing about the world that Pullman has created is that all humans have an animal counterpart, a daemon, that accompanies them throughout life. When you are a child, this daemon can change into different forms - bat, badger, mouse, moth, ermine, cat, tiger, sparrow, etc. If you are a boy, then your daemon is almost always female; if you are a girl, your daemon is almost always male. When you reach puberty, your daemon settles into one form or another. To me that was the most intriguing part. If I had read this book when I was young, I am sure that I would have obsessed over the idea of having a daemon. Some creatures in Pullman's world do not have daemons, and they are perceived by the young heroine as very lonely and cold beings.

I am sure that if I had a daemon, it would be in the form of a cat. No, wait, that is my waking life!


You sound just like me! I too read the Chronicles of Narnia & didn't realize the subtext - I wasn't much of a church-going kid. I recently read The Golden Compass, loved it, and even though I'm not a kid, am slightly obsessed with the idea of daemons! I can't wait to start the next book, but am far too broke to buy it at the moment :(

stegan
05-30-2006, 08:45 AM
FINALLY got a chance to sit down and finish Freakonomics- excellent read. While there are many intolerable economists around, I like the ones who are willing to put aside some of the politeness and ask "why?" I certainly didn't agree with all of it, but it was extremely thought provoking.

Not sure what I'm moving on to next- I've been reading a lot of non-fiction lately, and I have several recommendations in a pile (including some that are bound to make me :blush: ), but maybe it's time for a trip to the bibliotheque to pick up some light breezy summer reads...

steroidicalkiwi
05-30-2006, 08:52 AM
i'm a BIG fan of chuck palahniuk. he has a different way of writing but i swear if you read "diary", you'll fall in love. i also recommend "a heartbreaking work of staggering genius" by dave eggers. you might really like that one too. i read animal farm. i liked it, although i'm a little more into more non-fiction types. that book was good though. there was a alot of symbolism that alluded to the soviet union if i remember correctly.

bluedawg
05-30-2006, 10:11 AM
let's see, recently i've read...

living among meat eaters by carol adams: i liked this book, and it's one of those books i should probably read several times. i need a lot of her ideas to "stick" so a re-read is probably in my distant future. (too many others to get through before then!)

the five love languages by gary chapman: this book was loaned to me by one of my undergrads, who wanted my "take" on it. it's basically about different ways to communicate love, and his point is that people don't always speak the same "love language" as their partner. my take is: rather "churchy," purely anecdotal, quite over-simplified, but at its heart an interesting and valid idea.

cat vs. cat by pamela johnson-bennett: i'm still working my way through this one (had to put it on hold while i read the five love languages) but i like it so far. i'm very interested in learning about how my boys talk to each other.

MissLovely
05-30-2006, 10:28 AM
I'm reading Orgasms for Two by Betty Dodson. I have a pile of books from the library, next on my agenda is Not Buying It by Judith Levine, then Girlbomb: a halfway homeless memoir by Janice Erlbaum.

stegan
05-30-2006, 10:31 AM
I'm reading Orgasms for Two by Betty Dodson.
Too funny- one of the books in my recommendations pile is Sex For One by Betty Dodson. :)

Miso Vegan
05-30-2006, 12:36 PM
Just bought Heartbreaking Work of...

But am 1/3 thru The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, and I'm really enjoying it. I've never had a book throw so many unfamiliar words at me.

Also somewhere in the beginning/middle of the Tao of Motherhood (I'm perpetually in it, somewhere) and started but dropped off Hold Onto Your Kids (a really important book, but I'm denial about my son ever getting older despite his fast-approaching birthday so the book seems irrelevant).

And getting thru wedding books, currently Green Weddings that Don't Cost the Earth which is less helpful than I expected.

luciapet
06-03-2006, 08:10 PM
I'm reading Orgasms for Two by Betty Dodson. I have a pile of books from the library, next on my agenda is Not Buying It by Judith Levine, then Girlbomb: a halfway homeless memoir by Janice Erlbaum.

hey, misslovely, are you a bust girl? i just finished reading "girlbomb" and i loved it. although it's a little too ready to okay meat-eating sometimes, i love bust because it's also pretty vegan friendly. (recipes, products, etc.)

right now i'm reading "slaughterhouse five" by kurt vonnegut, as he is my new crush. i read "breakfast of champions" a while back and it blew me away.

theveganmary
06-03-2006, 08:21 PM
I'm reading "The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying" for the second time; I first read it a few years ago when my mom was diagnosed with breast cancer for the second time. (One mastectomy later, she's fine :) ... won't enact any dietary changes, though :umm: )

one gallant
06-03-2006, 08:26 PM
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert Pirsig. great book so far.

veganarchist
06-03-2006, 08:55 PM
A few weeks back I read Tom Wolfe's 'The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test' about Ken Kesey, the Merry Pranksters and the whole L.S.D. trip and it was one of the best books I ever read so that put me in a Ken Kesey mood. So right now I'm reading 'Sometimes A Great Notion' and 'Kesey's Garage Sale'

attackferret
06-04-2006, 07:44 AM
I read don't shoot the dog by karen pryor yesterday. i was surprised that it wasn't even in the dog training section at the library, but rather with behavioral psychology books. i think it'll really help me out, not only with dog training but also with dealing with other people/endeavors in my life :)

Prophet
06-04-2006, 12:52 PM
Reading "The Da Vinci Code" right now by Dan Brown.

earthstorm
06-05-2006, 07:20 AM
Gosh, doesn't anyone here read fiction??? ;) You guys put me to shame-- I just recovered a box of "Classics" from my folks' house and am re-reading "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep" by Philip K. Dick, the novel upon which the movie "Blade Runner" was based. :p

I LOVE Fiction, especially horror.

But right now I am reading "Hope's Edge, The Next Diet for a Small Planet" by Frances Moore Lappe and Anna Lappe

An amazing book!

MissLovely
06-05-2006, 05:09 PM
I'm reading Orgasms for Two by Betty Dodson. I have a pile of books from the library, next on my agenda is Not Buying It by Judith Levine, then Girlbomb: a halfway homeless memoir by Janice Erlbaum.

So I'm reading Girlbomb: a halfway homeless memoir by Janice Erlbaum and I can not put it down. It's so great. :heart:

gladcow
06-05-2006, 05:40 PM
library book, or can I borrow it? :D

MissLovely
06-05-2006, 06:12 PM
library book, or can I borrow it? :D
Library, as always. :kiss:

gladcow
06-05-2006, 08:52 PM
I better put it on my "look for it at the library" list. :kiss:

MissLovely
06-06-2006, 09:56 AM
So I'm reading Girlbomb: a halfway homeless memoir by Janice Erlbaum and I can not put it down. It's so great. :heart:
I finished my book yesterday afternoon. Last night as I was putting away groceries, I thought, "Oooh, I can't wait to get back to my book." I was so sad when I relaized it was over. Now I'm reading Not Buying It but it's kind of dumb. :umm:

attackferret
06-07-2006, 06:33 PM
I just finished The Farming of Bones by Edwidge Danticat. It was amazing. I loved it. It also made me cry and cringe a bit. It's a historical fiction which frames the time period before and following the Haitian genocide at the hands of the Dominicans. The author is also a short story writer, and I think she uses that to her advantage in this book. Two thumbs up :)

stegan
06-29-2006, 07:41 AM
Currently reading:

Please Feed Me: A Punk Vegan Cookbook- Niall McGuirk
The show stories are pretty amusing, but some of the recipes are hilarious:


Bread Sandwich
Slice three pieces of your favorite bread
Place one slice in between the other two slices
Eat.

Also reading:

Clitoral Truth: The Secret World At Your Fingertips- Rebecca Chalker
It's educational :D

Vegtink
06-29-2006, 09:57 AM
Animal Farm (again)

Shantih
06-29-2006, 11:55 AM
Thinner by Stephen King, and Tender Is The Night by F Scott Fitzgerald. Love them both :kiss:

gladcow
06-29-2006, 02:20 PM
Popco by Scarlett Thomas

so so SO good!

Tracy G
07-04-2006, 11:20 PM
Woman in the Mirror by Richard Avedon. This amazing collection of photographic portraits spans 1945 to 2004.

theveganmary
07-04-2006, 11:58 PM
A Minor Apocalypse, by Polish author Tadeusz Konwicki. I'm taking another break from my mostly nonfiction reading habits to read this and maybe a couple more fiction titles. I just started it, so I don't know yet if it's any good.

Miso Vegan
07-05-2006, 01:18 PM
After a month-long hiatus half way through, I returned to and nearly finished The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay. 7/8th of the way through, and I'm already so sad that it's ending soon.

gur
07-06-2006, 07:37 AM
a heartbreaking work of staggering genius - i couldn't put this down; i started it one night and only stopped because i could not see anymore due to tiredness, woke up and finished it in the morning! ha..

the orchid thief - only about 60 pages in, but it's good so far!

lip smackin' vegetarian backpackin': lightweight trail-tested vegetarian recipes for backcountry trips - holy long enough title? :p i haven't made anything out of it yet. it's mostly vegan, or easily veganized. funny recipe titles like "grizzly berry granola". it has quite a few dehydrator recipes though, and i don't have a dehydrator.

clicker training for cats (karen pryor) - short book. ima start training this weekend, methinks.

sex for one (betty dodson) - because stegan recommended it in his blog. and well, why not? :blush:

inspired by mishka and quagga; marathoning for mortals
which will hopefully counter the effects of:

sinfully vegan - the boston cream doughnuts might be dangerous. :blank:

the vegetarian meat and potatoes cookbook - maybe my dad won't 'miss the meat' so much when i cook for him at the cottage this summer. :brood:

eat to live - also to counter the effects of sinfully vegan. :p

the china study - i just can't seem to get into it.

Prophet
07-06-2006, 08:07 AM
Lord of the Flies by William Golding - I just started the book, so I don't know what it's like.

Vegtink
07-06-2006, 08:37 AM
Lord of the Flies by William Golding - I just started the book, so I don't know what it's like.
A great read Prophet, enjoy.

mishka
07-06-2006, 09:48 AM
My new Japanese sewing books (Simple Chic, Skirt a la carte, and another one I can't read the name of) that came in the mail this morning! Weee!

Okay, so they're mostly pictures... and written in Japanese... um... anyone know how to read numbers in Japanese?

bluedawg
07-06-2006, 04:04 PM
clicker training for cats (karen pryor) - short book. ima start training this weekend, methinks.NO WAY! she's awesome, i had no idea she wrote a book about kitties. please update with how it goes!

quagga
07-06-2006, 05:55 PM
inspired by mishka and quagga; marathoning for mortals


Go gur go!

gur
07-06-2006, 06:54 PM
NO WAY! she's awesome, i had no idea she wrote a book about kitties. please update with how it goes!

mmkay! what's funny is, the library doesn't even have the dog version. sheesh.

gur
07-06-2006, 06:56 PM
Go gur go!

hee hee :silly:

veganshawn
07-11-2006, 08:54 AM
Philllip K Dick - Minority Report (a bunch of his short stories).

hazelfaern
07-11-2006, 09:41 AM
Philllip K Dick - Minority Report (a bunch of his short stories).

Oooh, I love PKD. I just finished Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and a short story reader which includes one of my favorites of his, "I Hope I Shall Arrive Soon".

I'm not really reading anything, at the moment. I've got The Case for Animal Rights and Cryptonomicon both on pause. I'm considering picking up some lighter reading.

mishka
07-11-2006, 09:57 AM
I've decided to take a break from knitting during my commutes and start reading the pile of boks on my "to read" list. Starting with...

The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell

veganshawn
07-11-2006, 10:54 PM
Oooh, I love PKD. I just finished Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and a short story reader which includes one of my favorites of his, "I Hope I Shall Arrive Soon".

I'm not really reading anything, at the moment. I've got The Case for Animal Rights and Cryptonomicon both on pause. I'm considering picking up some lighter reading.

I just read Radio Free Albermuth (sp?) and loved it, but the funny thing is I have had the book since 1999 but couldn't get into back then and now love it. I am going to read the one that you mention soon. He was a very intresting person as well.

theveganmary
07-11-2006, 10:58 PM
A Minor Apocalypse, by Polish author Tadeusz Konwicki. I'm taking another break from my mostly nonfiction reading habits to read this and maybe a couple more fiction titles. I just started it, so I don't know yet if it's any good.

Wasn't getting into this book, so I abandoned it and have just started Look At All the Harlequins by Nabokov.

MissLovely
07-11-2006, 10:59 PM
Christopher Noxon-Rejuvenile Kickball, Cartoons, Cupcakes, and the Reinvention of the American Grown-up

It's basically as irrtiating as it sounds, but of course, I had to read it.

bird
07-11-2006, 11:30 PM
Is that really his last name? :laugh:

MissLovely
07-11-2006, 11:55 PM
Is that really his last name? :laugh:
woops, fruedian typo. :laugh:

zatoichi
07-12-2006, 05:31 AM
i just started Diet for a New America, which means i'm probably the last person here to read it.

i have a question though. this is an original 198? publication. is there much i'm missing from the newer editions?

hazelfaern
07-12-2006, 08:10 AM
i just started Diet for a New America, which means i'm probably the last person here to read it.

i have a question though. this is an original 198? publication. is there much i'm missing from the newer editions?

I can vouch for the fact that you're not the last person to read DNA. I have a very, very long reading list and it just keeps right on getting longer. :blank:

mishka
07-12-2006, 08:22 AM
I can vouch for the fact that you're not the last person to read DNA.
ditto.

Dandelion
07-12-2006, 02:38 PM
is there much i'm missing from the newer editions?
yeah, facts.
DOH! :p

koolkat
07-12-2006, 04:07 PM
Who Has Seen the Wind? by WO Mitchell.

I liked it so much in high school that I read it every couple of years.

seitanicvegan
07-13-2006, 07:59 PM
Pleasurable Kingdom: Animals and the Nature of Feeling Good by Jonathan Balcombe. I just bought this book today, so I haven't even started it. Apparently, Balcombe presents evidence and anecdotes to argue that animals (beyond domesticated pets) feel pleasure in response to stimuli.

I think my project for this weekend will be to read this and two books by Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson, When Elephants Weep and The Pig Who Sang to the Moon: The Emotional World of Farm Animals.

seitanicvegan
07-13-2006, 08:02 PM
I can vouch for the fact that you're not the last person to read DNA. I have a very, very long reading list and it just keeps right on getting longer. :blank:

I haven't read Diet for a New America either. :umm: It's sitting on my bookshelf right over there as I type this, part of my ever growing piles of Must Read Right Now books. :rolleyes:

nauthiz
07-13-2006, 08:08 PM
Am I the only one here who isn't currently planning on reading Diet for a New America?

I just finished the first two volumes of Nausicaä. I just started A Theory of Justice by John Rawls 'cuz I never finished it on the first try.

bluedawg
07-13-2006, 08:11 PM
Am I the only one here who isn't currently planning on reading Diet for a New America? hee! i haven't read it, and i'm not planning to do so anytime soon. i think it might be on my amazon wishlist but it's toward the bottom. there are a bunch of others i really want to read before i even think about that one.

zatoichi
07-13-2006, 11:39 PM
yeah, facts.
DOH! :p

egh. i'm just going to continue reading it and remain mindful about the publication date. the general info sounds about right. i'm not going to be taking notes when it comes to the bar graphs and specific numbers, and this won't be the last AR or health book i read. i was going to get a copy from the library, but there's is old too.

MissLovely
07-13-2006, 11:41 PM
Christopher Noxon-Rejuvenile Kickball, Cartoons, Cupcakes, and the Reinvention of the American Grown-up

It's basically as irrtiating as it sounds, but of course, I had to read it.

So, after the set-up chapters, it's turning out to be a pretty descent read. Did anyone know that Lewis Carroll was most likely a pedophile? :o

grog
07-13-2006, 11:43 PM
Lewis Carroll was most likely a pedophile? :o

um, hello? mcfly? I thought everyone knew that :p

MissLovely
07-13-2006, 11:44 PM
um, hello? mcfly? I thought everyone knew that :p
I've always hated those stories, never had interest. Um. OK.
:slinking away:

grog
07-13-2006, 11:49 PM
oh don't do that! Don't mind cranky me!
:loveyou:

zatoichi
07-13-2006, 11:56 PM
Did anyone know that Lewis Carroll was most likely a pedophile? :o

from what i read at wikipedia, the evidence sounds pretty flimsy. i think it would more fair to say that it has been suggested by certain biographers that he may have been. not that he most likely was.

MissLovely
07-14-2006, 12:33 AM
from what i read at wikipedia, the evidence sounds pretty flimsy. i think it would more fair to say that it has been suggested by certain biographers that he may have been. not that he most likely was.
Pssshhh. whatever mr. "innocent unless proven guilty" :p

zatoichi
07-14-2006, 12:42 AM
i mean, i had this impression that he was a huge drug-user as well, but apparently there's like zero evidence for that claim. it's just interesting how myths can build out of speculation to the point where nobody knows what the truth is anymore. it's just biographers quoting biographers and historians researching historians.

gladcow
07-14-2006, 01:36 AM
Just finished "Leaving the Saints" by Martha Beck

working on "We've Got Spirit" and about to start "Truth & Beauty"

Vegtink
07-14-2006, 08:16 AM
I am reading the gladcow cookbook.

gladcow
07-14-2006, 08:30 AM
I am reading the gladcow cookbook.
:D :kiss:

Vegtink
07-14-2006, 08:32 AM
:D :kiss:
It's a page turner what can I say.

stegan
07-14-2006, 08:44 AM
I am reading the gladcow cookbook.
A delicious read, to be sure. :)

Vegtink
07-14-2006, 08:53 AM
A delicious read, to be sure. :)
Oh very. :D

Dandelion
07-14-2006, 10:07 AM
from what i read at wikipedia, the evidence sounds pretty flimsy. i think it would more fair to say that it has been suggested by certain biographers that he may have been. not that he most likely was.
my theory is:
he's actually Jack the Ripper.

Sunnysublime
07-16-2006, 01:28 PM
I'm currently reading beauty in the beasts-true stories of animals who choose to do good
its awsome, I highly recommend it :)

dropscone
07-16-2006, 01:43 PM
I've just finished reading Modesty Blaise, they brought out an anniversary edition. Very enjoyable pulp fiction :D

I'm actually dipping into Paddionton Bear stories at the moment. I don't plan on having kids, but I don't see why I should miss out on reliving my childhood through fiction :)

Chrysander
07-16-2006, 01:55 PM
Reading Donnie Brasco: My Life Undercover in the Mafia by Joseph Pistone. It's very different to the film, lots more detail, he covers what he did in a very straight-forward matter-of-fact way. It has made me slightly dislike the film because of how the film-makers decided to change events for no reason. The book is a good read.

bird
07-20-2006, 07:07 PM
I borrowed Fast Food Nation from Tyler on Sunday and finished it today. Matt owned a copy, too, but for some reason I just haven't gotten around to the Vegan Bibles yet. This is my first read out of the staples in the Vegan Library. It was very engrossing. The slaughterhouse descriptions were even more horrifying than I anticipated, despite my being forewarned by Matt of their awfulness and my having previously read Packinghouse Daughter.

I only wish he had devoted as much time to the poultry industry as he did to the beef industry. Nevertheless, a great piece of investigative journalism. Now I'm all primed to see the movie when it finally comes out. :)

bluedawg
07-21-2006, 08:36 PM
i finally finished cat vs. cat on the airplane (it was okay, although unfortunately it didn't address the main question i had when i selected it. boo.) and right away i got started on vegan: the new ethics of eating by erik marcus. i'm reading the revised edition from 2001. pretty good so far; i'm wrapping up the health section.

nauthiz
07-22-2006, 06:56 PM
I finished The Dispossessed today. I just took Vegan back to the library; I skimmed it rather than reading it, but it seemed a good book. Just checked out The Satanic Verses because I haven't spent nearly enough time thinking about the clash between Islamic and Western values lately. :rolleyes:

vegbrain
07-22-2006, 07:32 PM
I started 'An Anthropologist on Mars (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0679756973/104-8059088-7310301?v=glance&n=283155)', only for it to get lost.....:mad:

great book so far....

stegan
07-24-2006, 08:24 AM
After seeing Word Play on Saturday, we went over to the used bookstore across the street and did a little stack wandering. And of course, I couldn't leave without purchases. So the new additions to my library are:

The Abortion Rights Controversy in America: A Legal Reader (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0807855359/002-0140594-2126433?v=glance&n=283155) (yeah, I dork like that.)
Henry Miller- Tropic of Capricorn (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0802151825/sr=1-1/qid=1153747323/ref=pd_bbs_1/002-0140594-2126433?ie=UTF8&s=books)
Douglas Coupland- Miss Wyoming (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0375407340/sr=1-2/qid=1153747389/ref=pd_bbs_2/002-0140594-2126433?ie=UTF8&s=books)

mishka
07-25-2006, 08:18 AM
Just finished The Tipping Point (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0316346624/sr=1-1/qid=1153833465/ref=pd_bbs_1/104-1211810-5341513?ie=UTF8&s=books) and picked up How Soon Is Never (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0609810405/104-1211810-5341513?v=glance&n=283155) this morning. I have a feeling I'll be listening to The Smiths a lot during this book. Just like when reading Girlfriend in a Coma (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0060987324/sr=1-1/qid=1153833442/ref=pd_bbs_1/104-1211810-5341513?ie=UTF8&s=books).

stegan
07-25-2006, 08:25 AM
How Soon Is Never (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0609810405/104-1211810-5341513?v=glance&n=283155) this morning. I have a feeling I'll be listening to The Smiths a lot during this book.
:laugh:

hazelfaern
07-25-2006, 10:21 PM
Read through Margaret Atwoods Cat's Eye in one sitting, the other night.

I'm still slogging through The Case for Animal Rights. It suddenly dawned on me, last night, as I'm about half-way through the book, that I would love the material if it were done as a lecture. As a book, it just gets repetitive and I start going page blind every 5 minutes or so.

Foxy
07-25-2006, 11:30 PM
Almost done with Vegan Freak: Being Vegan in a non-Vegan World. I really like it, even though the whole layout of the book is a bit odd. Still, it's easy to read (or maybe that's only because I find it interesting).

LazyGirl
07-27-2006, 01:31 PM
I'm currently reading Lady of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley. I'm already annoyed with one of the principle characters (Gawen; Sianna, too, a little bit), though, so I'm not sure if I will enjoy this one as much as I enjoyed The Mists of Avalon.

pinkvegan
07-27-2006, 11:49 PM
I'm reading The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night (http://www.powells.com/biblio?isbn=1400032717), too, and it is lovely and sweet and sad, just like Catcher (http://www.powells.com/biblio/1-0316769487-3) and also Perks of Being a Wallflower (http://www.powells.com/biblio/1-0671027344-17).

stegan
07-28-2006, 08:02 AM
I'm reading The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night (http://www.powells.com/biblio?isbn=1400032717), too, and it is lovely and sweet and sad
I loooooooove that book for the very same reason- you find yourself laughing and mad and happy and welling up with tears, all at different points in the book.

stegan
08-07-2006, 08:31 AM
I finished Douglas Coupland- Miss Wyoming last night, and it was a wonderful whirlwind of a read. But once again, I was left hungering for more about the characters at the end as they drove off into the proverbial sunset- I hate when that happens! :furious:

And yet, I highly recommend it. :D

mishka
08-07-2006, 01:34 PM
I have 2 books up next:

Blink and Freakonomics.

Which should I pick up first?

chikara_no_tori
08-07-2006, 01:35 PM
"Boogiepop and Others" is on the list right now. Pretty good actually.

stegan
08-07-2006, 01:48 PM
I have 2 books up next:

Blink and Freakonomics.

Which should I pick up first?
I haven't read Blink, but it's on my list. Freakonomics was really, really interesting though. I can't help but think I would have liked it more if Levitt (the economist) had written it by himself instead of with the newspaper guy.

Vegtink
08-07-2006, 02:05 PM
I finally started to read The DaVinci Code

Husky Corn Star
08-08-2006, 04:54 AM
... I'm reading this thread, I think that is more than obvious !!! :brood:

*sigh*

Emiloid
08-08-2006, 11:58 AM
Me too! What a coincidence!

I also started Sick Puppy by Carl Hiaasen. I really like it so far. Very funny, good characters, etc. I can see why my family kept telling me to read it. :cool:

Miso Vegan
08-08-2006, 01:50 PM
I finally started to read The DaVinci Code
Is it as bad as everyone says it is?

bird
08-08-2006, 01:53 PM
Bad? :confused: I thought it was entertaining.

atouria
08-08-2006, 02:17 PM
I loved the Da Vinci code!!

The movie, to me, was like.. "we heard you liked the book, here's a movie." And the ending was a little different, which aggravated me. The book was much, much, much better.

grog
08-08-2006, 02:54 PM
If you look at the Da Vinci code as entertaining fiction, is probably ok (i haven't actually read)

If you consider millions of dupes believe it to be fact, because they spun it that way, even though they labeled it fiction, then its probably not enjoyable.

mamaquilla
08-08-2006, 04:08 PM
I loved DeVinci Code and Angels and Demons by the same Author. They were exciting and entertaining, whats not to like!:happy:

chikara_no_tori
08-09-2006, 10:41 AM
i think i will try DaVinci code next...but no the movie...i don't like Tom Hanks as an actor for some reason...i haven't figured it out yet...

koolkat
08-10-2006, 11:22 AM
I’m deep into a book that I’ve been trying to read for almost two years – The Godfather Returns by Mark Winegardner. I’ve seen all of the Godfather movies but this is the first book I’ve read based on Mario Puzo’s characters. Once I got through the first chapter, I was hooked. In three days, I’ve read through ¾ of the book and it’s hard to put it down. Very cool book. I'm really into sequels lately, books and movies.

gravity_defiant
08-10-2006, 08:54 PM
Me too! What a coincidence!

I also started Sick Puppy by Carl Hiaasen. I really like it so far. Very funny, good characters, etc. I can see why my family kept telling me to read it. :cool:

Hey, I just read that a week or so ago. It started out grerat, but to be honest the whole thing started getting kind of old for me towards the end.

I'm currently reading Between the Bridge and the River, by Craig Ferguson. AKA the guy from The Late Late Show, aka Mr. Wick from the Drew Carey show. I was a little dubious about this guy's writing abilities, but the book is surprisingly really good!

moonflower
08-13-2006, 10:52 PM
I've just picked up Women who Run with the Wolves by Clarissa Pinkola Estes, which I've had in my room for about a year now. I've heard alot of great things about it and I'm liking it.
I feel like it's come into my life at the right time. :yes:

Miso Vegan
08-14-2006, 12:45 PM
I am about halfway through I Do, but I Don't by Kami Wycoff, and it's a very well-written deconstruction of the traditions around marraige (including engagements, rings, planning, etc). The author looks back at her engagement and wedding, processes in which she totally lost herself, and tries to figure out how that happened.
I think it's an important book for anyone (male or female) who will ever get married.
It's not an amazing book, but it is a very good book so far.

dropscone
08-14-2006, 02:05 PM
About a zillion acoustic guitar books!

grog
08-14-2006, 04:01 PM
About a zillion acoustic guitar books!

teehee. see the songs on my myspace, I'm the master of 4 chord acoustic songs ;)

MercurialMary
08-16-2006, 08:48 PM
A Sense of the World : How a Blind Man Became History's Greatest Traveler By Jason Roberts

Excellent, excellent, excellent

veganshawn
08-16-2006, 09:56 PM
Ender's Game,so far it is a good book.

nauthiz
08-17-2006, 01:37 AM
Ender's Game,so far it is a good book.

One of my favorite books ever.

gr8flgrl
08-22-2006, 06:02 PM
The Essential Ken Wilber. I really love that guy.

nauthiz
08-22-2006, 08:57 PM
I just started Gravity's Rainbow.

I'm looking forward to getting to spend a couple months strutting around and acting all superior bookish hipster intelligentsia whatever when I finish it in June.

gr8flgrl
08-22-2006, 09:27 PM
How lucky for you to still be able to pull-off hipsterish. My general demeanor just screams MOM.

Nanashi
08-22-2006, 10:24 PM
I just started Gravity's Rainbow.

I'm looking forward to getting to spend a couple months strutting around and acting all superior bookish hipster intelligentsia whatever when I finish it in June.

Yeah that part's great. That and about 1/8th of the book which manages to make some sense. Mostly I just wish I'd never read that book. I'm really hoping that Mason Dixon is better, it's on my shelf threatening to bore me to tears like Gravity's Rainbow did.

wildmindgirl
08-22-2006, 11:47 PM
check this out-Big readers might find this site interesting.

"LibraryThing can analyze your entire catalog and come up with 100 or so books you might want to check out."

"Enter what you're reading or your whole library—it's an easy, library-quality catalog. Because everyone else is doing it too, LibraryThing connects you with people who read the same things."

http://www.librarything.com/

mishka
08-31-2006, 08:18 AM
Thanks, wildmindgirl - that site sounds great!

Veronika Decides to Die (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0060955775/104-3183187-9619132?v=glance&n=283155) - Paulo Coelho

His writing is so beautiful. I read The Alchemist a few years ago, and I think I may feel inspired to read it again after I finish this one.

wildmindgirl
08-31-2006, 05:09 PM
I'm reading:

Light on Yoga by BKS Iyengar

and

Light on Pranayama BKS Iyengar

paul
08-31-2006, 06:05 PM
animal farm again goerge orwell.
and

stark- ben elton

:D

dropscone
08-31-2006, 06:53 PM
Just finished reading All over creation by Ruth L Ozeki. I really really liked My year of meat, which was her first novel.

I love the way she takes an issue (in this case genetically engineered seeds) and weaves it into a story with imense humaneness, and how she manages to find a point to identify with most of her characters. And it had a group of vegans in it, who were great :)

kikkert
09-19-2006, 09:45 PM
My partner just surprised me with The Chalice & the Blade by Riane Eisler. I can't wait to start reading it!

mamaquilla
09-19-2006, 09:53 PM
I am reading the Peace Pilgrim recommended by our own good Vegetexan, reallllllllllllly good book. She is an inspiring woman :)

Shion
09-19-2006, 10:43 PM
I just finished The Otherwind By Ursula K Le Guin:)
I am finishing A Man Rides through: Part 2 of Mordants Need By: Stephen R. Donaldson.:)
More books:

Wicca for Beginners, a Haiku anthology, An anthology of Japanese Lit, A Handbook to Everyday Life in Ancient Egypt, and will probably start re-reading my fall favorites~Tolkien, Rowling, Brave New World, and Dune...but then I love Robin Hobb too so where to start?:umm: I am also a library adict, so who knows? Need a bigger coffee table;)

kikkert
09-20-2006, 07:26 AM
Thanks to my lovin man, even more books to read!

Jasper Fforde Jack Spratt Investigates: The Big Over Easy
Gideon Defoe The Pirates! In an Adventure with Scientists, The Pirates! In an Adventure with Ahab
Thomas More Utopia
Rodney Dale The Book of Where?
Susan Shade & Jon Buller Travels of Thelonious

I am so lucky. :happy:

Vegtink
09-20-2006, 07:43 AM
I am a fiction junkie so I am reading Hot and Bothered by Annie Downey. It is about a single and sexy mom. I felt it was fitting.

veganshawn
09-20-2006, 08:39 AM
Recalling the Good Fight: An Autobiography of the Spanish Civil War (Paperback)

By John Tisa

A must read for anyone intrested in the Spanish Civil war.

wildmindgirl
09-20-2006, 10:28 AM
The 100 Simple Secrets of Happy People
Writing Personal Essays
Writing and Publishing Personal Essays

MissLovely
09-20-2006, 10:37 AM
I read Disco Bloodbath renamed Party Monster after the movie release. I haven't seen the movie, but the book is HILARIOUS. James St. James has a cunning sense of humor. I thoroughly enjoyed it. Great vacation read.

Miso Vegan
09-20-2006, 01:50 PM
I have made little progress on two books I've already mentioned. I Do But I Don't, and Hold On To Your Kids. But I'm still enjoying them.

bird
09-21-2006, 03:14 PM
Thomas Wolfe - You Can't Go Home Again

holidayatsea
09-21-2006, 04:26 PM
"fierce invalids home from hot climates"-- by tom robbins. (no, not the motivational speaker guy....) :)

gladcow
09-21-2006, 04:49 PM
"fierce invalids home from hot climates"-- by tom robbins. (no, not the motivational speaker guy....) :)
LOVE LOVE LOVE that book. I have a signed copy :D

Miso Vegan
09-21-2006, 06:22 PM
Fierce Invalids is awesome! Oh, I giggle just hearing the name, although most of his books has that effect.

LazyGirl
09-22-2006, 09:25 AM
I'm currently reading The New Book of Goddesses and Heroines by Patricia Monaghan. Great stuff! I borrowed it from the library, but I think I want my own copy to add to my mythology reference collection. Not only does it provide detailed information about goddesses and mythic female figures of various cultures, it also gives a nice overview of those cultures and the role(s) of feminine divinity in them. I've already got a long list of related topics that I want to research, thanks to this book.

Joda
10-21-2006, 10:09 PM
Among the hardcore feminist writings - Lucy Lippard's 'Get the Message' and 'The Pink Glass Swan', Griselda Pollock's 'Generation and Geographies in the Visual Arts / Feminist Readings' - :cool: I enjoy winding down with a quick read and an all time favourite - Richard Bach's 'Jonathon Livingston Seagull' ,... it makes your heart and soul sing!!!! :D

MercurialMary
10-22-2006, 02:28 PM
Anne Lamott - Traveling Mercies

VegeTexan
10-22-2006, 02:29 PM
The Face by Dean Koontz. I love Koontz.

Flower
10-22-2006, 02:33 PM
The Face by Dean Koontz. I love Koontz.

Me too! I've read every single one of his books.

I'm currently reading Dead Watch by John Sandford. Not my favorite author, but I still like his stuff.

VegeTexan
10-22-2006, 02:37 PM
Me too! I've read every single one of his books.

I'm currently reading Dead Watch by John Sandford. Not my favorite author, but I still like his stuff.

YEA, another Koontz fan. Everyone who loves dogs (and I bet there are a lot of them here) should read Watchers.

mamaquilla
10-22-2006, 03:54 PM
I read Carol J. Adams The Inner Life of a Vegetarian (most of it)
Tried to read her Living With Meat-eaters but found it to be awfully negative and stopped.
Also tried to read The Pornography of Meat but it literally made me sick to my stomach so didnt get past the first Chapter :umm:
Vegan Freak - LOVED IT =]
Am currently reading Vegan With a Vegence, Nonna's Italian Vegan Cookbook, The Vegan Family Cookbook and finished the Vegan Cupcakes Take Over The World Cookbook (oh my goodness, the yumminess!)

need to start Mercy, unloved :happy:

Dave_81
10-22-2006, 04:05 PM
I'm reading Rain Without Thunder, by Gary Francione and Towards an Inclusive Democracy, by Takis Fotopoulos. Both highly recommended.

rantingsteve
10-22-2006, 04:28 PM
I'm currently reading The Sexual Politics of Meat by Carol Adams.

veganshawn
10-22-2006, 05:46 PM
I read Carol J. Adams The Inner Life of a Vegetarian (most of it)
Tried to read her Living With Meat-eaters but found it to be awfully negative and stopped.
Also tried to read The Pornography of Meat but it literally made me sick to my stomach so didnt get past the first Chapter :umm:
Vegan Freak - LOVED IT =]
Am currently reading Vegan With a Vegence, Nonna's Italian Vegan Cookbook, The Vegan Family Cookbook and finished the Vegan Cupcakes Take Over The World Cookbook (oh my goodness, the yumminess!)

need to start Mercy, unloved :happy:

I really liked Vegan Freak when I read it, but after getting to know the author I am dissapointed in how different he is compared to how he came off in his book.
I gave my copy away to someone and I hope that she will stay vegan with help from that book.
And I have only read Carol J Adams "Sexual Politics of Meat" and at the time (10+ years ago) enjoyed it, have not read any of her other stuff.

veganshawn
10-22-2006, 05:50 PM
I am reading:
The Anarchists of Casas Viejas-Jerome R. Mintz

It is a really good read, but really hard at the same time (there is a lot of back story they try to squeeze in) it is an interesting read for anyone interested in the Spanish Civil War (their uprising is on the reasons Franco cited for his coup).

rantingsteve
10-22-2006, 06:34 PM
I also liked Vegan Freak, and the authors (there are two of them) are good friends. They even presided over my wedding ceremony at the Farm Sanctuary in Watkins Glen, NY.

veganshawn
10-22-2006, 07:37 PM
Waiting on the Library to get in Neuromancer by William Gibson, one of those books that I always wanted to read and kept forgetting about.

Kat
10-22-2006, 07:59 PM
Right now I'm reading my homework, which is the Bowel Elimination chapter in Mosby's Canadian Textbook For The Support Worker.

Not the most entertaining thing to be reading, but I am mildly amused that there is a bowel elimination word-search game in my workbook.

mamaquilla
10-22-2006, 08:10 PM
Kat - hehehe

rantingsteve - awsome!

mamaquilla
10-23-2006, 06:09 PM
I finished Mercy, Unbound by Kim Antieau (fiction) - WOW really lovely, deep book about a young girl and eating disorders. highly recommend it! :)

attackferret
10-23-2006, 09:47 PM
i just read the outlaws of sherwood by robin mckinley and gathering blue by lois lowry. yay little kid books!

bird
11-01-2006, 12:30 PM
Right now I'm two thirds of the way through Dry by Augusten Burroughs. I just came across this part, which I found lovely and wanted to share:

"You don't see stars in the city. It's easy to forget they even exist. The last time I saw stars was in rehab. These look very different from the rehab stars. And immediately, I know why. Stars should not be seen alone. That's why there are so many. Two people should stand together and look at them. One person alone will surely miss the good ones."

I am finding special symbolism in stars lately. :heart:

stegan
11-01-2006, 12:36 PM
Right now I'm reading Nick Hornby's The Polysyllabic Spree. It's sort of literary criticism, but not at the same time. Hornby's definitely one of those authors I'd love to sit down and spend a day with.

Flower
11-01-2006, 01:04 PM
In the Dark of the Night, by John Saul.

apples_for_eva
11-01-2006, 01:27 PM
i've been reading so much lately (hooray for taking the quarter off from school!!)

food fight by kelly brownell and somebody horgen (SO good and SO scary)

genetically engineered food: a self-defense guide for consumers by ronnie cummins and ben lilliston

diet for a dead planet by christopher d cook

the paradox of choice: why more is less by barry schwartz

hungry planet by peter menzel and faith d'aluisio (SO FREAKIN' GOOD!!)- it's pictures of families from around the world surrounded by a week's worth of groceries. the contrasts are just staggering. all broken down into "food groups" and costs, etc. i couldn't put it down.

material world by the same authors

women in the material by the same authors

by bread alone by sarah-kate lynch which is a novel that i liked, mostly just because i needed some ficition to get into my brain before my head exploded.

veganshawn
11-01-2006, 02:17 PM
Waiting on the Library to get in Neuromancer by William Gibson, one of those books that I always wanted to read and kept forgetting about.

This book is amazing, you can see where the Wachowski (sp?) brothers got some of their ideas for the Matrix from.

grog
11-01-2006, 02:45 PM
all cyber-punk related stuff is descended from Neuromancer. It's good stuff.

stegan
11-01-2006, 02:47 PM
This book is amazing, you can see where the Wachowski (sp?) brothers got some of their ideas for the Matrix from.
I was actually startled by the similarities when I read Neuromancer, to the point that I was surprised Gibson didn't sue. The book was much, much better though, I thought.

veganshawn
11-01-2006, 02:55 PM
I was actually startled by the similarities when I read Neuromancer, to the point that I was surprised Gibson didn't sue. The book was much, much better though, I thought.

I think they changed it just enough to make it different but yeah, this book a long with Ghost in the Shell where huge influneces for the Matrix,though they admit it, they don't try and deny where they got the ideas from.

bird
11-01-2006, 03:47 PM
apples, how are you liking the barry schwartz book? i always wanted to take one his classes when i was in college, but i could never get in because they filled up too fast. :(

bluedawg
11-01-2006, 06:41 PM
hungry planet by peter menzel and faith d'aluisio (SO FREAKIN' GOOD!!)- it's pictures of families from around the world surrounded by a week's worth of groceries. the contrasts are just staggering. all broken down into "food groups" and costs, etc. i couldn't put it down.
i saw some examples from this book recently! i can't remember where, for the life of me... but they were really fascinating.

moonflower
11-05-2006, 06:46 PM
a confederacy of dunces - john kennedy toole

jaxin
11-05-2006, 06:50 PM
This book is amazing, you can see where the Wachowski (sp?) brothers got some of their ideas for the Matrix from.

I've been meaning to read that for a while too. My friend has 3 copies of it in his house :P I'm not quite sure why.. but I know he loves it.

jaxin
11-05-2006, 06:51 PM
I'm reading Becoming Vegan.. Finally. :P I should have read it a year ago, but whatever. I read three chapters this morning and went *rubs head* "too many facts!"

VegeTexan
11-05-2006, 09:11 PM
I'm reading Becoming Vegan.. Finally. :P I should have read it a year ago, but whatever. I read three chapters this morning and went *rubs head* "too many facts!"

Yes, that's a good book. Brenda Davis goes into great detail about the chemistry of veganism.

I am reading Still the Mind, by Alan Watts, a book on meditation.

bird
11-09-2006, 08:13 PM
Finished Dry. It was good. I may check out some more of his books in the future, although I don't have any plans to see Running With Scissors.

Now I'm on a Rilke kick: Letters to a Young Poet and Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge.

Bluejade
11-10-2006, 04:03 PM
I am reading the Ian Fleming classic - Casino Royale.

Film looks promising to.

Sunnysublime
11-10-2006, 04:30 PM
I just read a really good book. It took me a while to get into it though:umm:
Its called Ishmael

http://www.ishmael.com/Origins/Ishmael/

moonflower
11-10-2006, 05:31 PM
I just read a really good book. It took me a while to get into it though:umm:
Its called Ishmael

http://www.ishmael.com/Origins/Ishmael/

such a good book!!! love it!! :thumbsup:

dropscone
11-10-2006, 07:53 PM
I'm reading Yeah, I made it myself (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Yeah-Made-Myself-Fashion-Domestic/dp/0297851179) by Eithne Farry. It's a fun book with tips on making your own clothes for people who don't really know what they're doing (like me!). My friend Emma bought it for me, and I've been dipping into it trying to get inspiration to try to figure out how to work the sewing machine someone gave me.

moonflower
11-10-2006, 07:57 PM
I'm reading Yeah, I made it myself (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Yeah-Made-Myself-Fashion-Domestic/dp/0297851179) by Eithne Farry. It's a fun book with tips on making your own clothes for people who don't really know what they're doing (like me!). My friend Emma bought it for me, and I've been dipping into it trying to get inspiration to try to figure out how to work the sewing machine someone gave me.

yay, my dad gave me that book about a week ago! it is fun but i'll admit the only thing i'm interested in is that doodling dress, and i want the dog toy on that page more than anything else :silly:

mishka
11-10-2006, 10:54 PM
what am I reading? Too. much. VRF.

And just finished Me Talk Pretty One Day (http://www.chapters.indigo.ca/books/item/books-978031677696/0316776963/Me+Talk+Pretty+One+Day?ref=Search+Books%3a+'David+ Sedaris')

mishka
11-10-2006, 10:54 PM
such a good book!!! love it!! :thumbsup:
:yes: !!!

Nanashi
11-10-2006, 11:07 PM
...just finished Me Talk Pretty One Day (http://www.chapters.indigo.ca/books/item/books-978031677696/0316776963/Me+Talk+Pretty+One+Day?ref=Search+Books%3a+'David+ Sedaris')

Funny, I just read finished these David Sedaris books.

"Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim"
"Barrel Fever"
"Naked"

I didn't like the fiction stuff in Barrel Fever as much as his essays. But Barrel Fever ends with Santaland Diaries which makes all the rest worth it.

MercurialMary
11-15-2006, 05:14 PM
I just finished this whole series of books by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child. Each can stand on its own, but all the novels share characters, some of them main characters. I had read one or two out of order, then bought the whole series and started from the beginning. Most of them take place in the Museum of Natural History, which is super cool for me.

Their Website (http://www.prestonchild.com/index.html)

The Books:
Relic
Reliquary
Cabinet of Curiosities
Still Life With Crows
Brimstone
Dance of Death
Book of the Dead

moonflower
11-15-2006, 05:29 PM
cave in the snow: a western woman's quest for enlightenment - vicki mackenzie
the story of tenzin palmo

Flower
11-15-2006, 05:45 PM
Choke by Chuck Pahluniak (sp?)

peaches
11-15-2006, 11:03 PM
i would love to have time to read all the books in this thread *sigh*

currently i am readin we the living by ayn rand

MercurialMary
11-16-2006, 12:57 PM
i would love to have time to read all the books in this thread *sigh*

currently i am readin we the living by ayn rand


:heart: ayn rand

stegan
11-16-2006, 01:26 PM
I've been working my way through the latest AdBusters. There's always a lot of really interesting stuff in there. The only problem I have is when they change fonts to something barely readable. Too artsy fartsy! :shakes fist: :)

gur
11-16-2006, 01:27 PM
I'm reading Yeah, I made it myself (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Yeah-Made-Myself-Fashion-Domestic/dp/0297851179) by Eithne Farry. It's a fun book with tips on making your own clothes for people who don't really know what they're doing (like me!). My friend Emma bought it for me, and I've been dipping into it trying to get inspiration to try to figure out how to work the sewing machine someone gave me.
:adds to wishlist:

i'm reading this one (http://www.chapters.indigo.ca/books/item/books-978076113785/0761137858/Generation+T+121+Ways+To+Transform+A+Tshirt?ref=Se arch+Books%3a+'t+shirt') right now!
i used to make my own clothes all the time, and i wanna get back into it. :yes:

hazelfaern
11-16-2006, 06:27 PM
i used to make my own clothes all the time

So jealous!


I've been on a sci-fi jag lately. Last week I read:

The Crack in Space (www.amazon.com/Crack-Space-Philip-K-Dick/dp/1400030064/sr=1-1/qid=1163722077/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/104-5731134-5951132?ie=UTF8&s=books) -- strange. It's PKD's take on the 60's, including a scifi slant on race riots, politics and the population explosion, has a sort of "It's a Mad, Mad World" feel to it. I didn't like any of the characters in this story, although I thought some of Dick's metaphors were intriguing. A salient book, but it'd never hit my favorites list.

The Man Who Japed (www.amazon.com/Man-Who-Japed-Philip-Dick/dp/0375719350/sr=8-1/qid=1163722019/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/104-5731134-5951132?ie=UTF8&s=books) -- fantastic. Has a sort of classic Dickian noire feel to it. Interesting way to view group consciousness and ethics.

The Minority Report (www.amazon.com/Minority-Report-P-K-Dick/dp/0375421874/sr=1-2/qid=1163722121/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2/104-5731134-5951132?ie=UTF8&s=books) -- It'd be interesting to take "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" and pair it with this short story and do some sort of group discussion on vegan/AR themes in PKD stories.

The Divine Invasion (www.amazon.com/Divine-Invasion-Philip-K-Dick/dp/0679734457/sr=1-1/qid=1163722183/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/104-5731134-5951132?ie=UTF8&s=books) -- still reading this one.

Nonfiction book I've been slowly nibbling (har har):

Hope's Edge (www.amazon.com/Hopes-Edge-Next-Small-Planet/dp/1585421499/sr=1-2/qid=1163722246/ref=pd_bbs_2/104-5731134-5951132?ie=UTF8&s=books) -- it's not the next Diet for a Small Planet. It's an interesting anecdotal collection of stories about individuals and small groups who are currently having a noticable impact on either chronic hunger or poverty. It's very upbeat and in that sense, this book's right up my alley. On the other hand, it's really upsetting to read a very, very well known vegetarian activist describe getting a fish bone stuck in her throat. For five paragraphs.

and

Rattling the Cage (www.amazon.com/Rattling-Cage-Toward-Rights-Animals/dp/0738204374/sr=1-1/qid=1163722305/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/104-5731134-5951132?ie=UTF8&s=books) -- still working on this one. :)

hazelfaern
11-16-2006, 06:34 PM
I've been working my way through the latest AdBusters. There's always a lot of really interesting stuff in there. The only problem I have is when they change fonts to something barely readable. Too artsy fartsy! :shakes fist: :)

That's what comes of reading a magazine put together (essentially) by and for graphic designers. :)

One of my favorite Adbuster's layouts was an overview of your standard supermarket with a little dotted arrow path indicating how you'd typically push a buggy through the aisles and the legend at the top said:

You're a rat in the maze and you keep pressing the pleasure button

Late at night, when I'm up way past my bedtime cruising aimlessly around the internet, clickety-clicking at whatever with my mouse, that phrase comes back to haunt me. Yeah, yeah. Me clikety!! Me clickety more!!

gladcow
11-16-2006, 06:50 PM
Just finished "What Einstein Told His Cook" and on to "What Einstein Told His Cook 2"

:heart: food science :heart:

Emiloid
11-19-2006, 12:10 AM
I just started Not Buying It about a couple who decides not to buy anything unnecessary for one year. So far so good.

I'm also still working on Sick Puppy by Carl Hiaasan. It's good, but I got really busy for a while and haven't gotten back into it since then. But now I have a whole week off, and I'll probably finish it. :)

For a class on teaching reading in upper elementary grades (4-8), I re-read The Giver by Lois Lowry. It's a great book, and a fast read. I'd recommend it to anyone.

Bluejade
11-19-2006, 08:08 AM
I've been working my way through the latest AdBusters. There's always a lot of really interesting stuff in there. The only problem I have is when they change fonts to something barely readable. Too artsy fartsy! :shakes fist: :)

Amen to that.

I sub-ed to the mag but barely give it 10mins an issue. Ok, so they have figured out that the marketing people are essentially psychologists who attempt to play on peoples insecurities, desires, fears etc to make them do what they want. Well done.

But they use the irony every issue, and the content is sacrificed for the art-attack, they almost worship.

Perhaps they realise that the art/bullshit is used to cover deficiencies in a poor argument. But I find that an insult to the reader, who by definition, is 'in the know'.

Nice boots though.

sane-ax_addict
11-21-2006, 05:30 PM
i'm on the last chapter of Stephen King's Gerald's Game. not bad.

compassionate1
11-21-2006, 05:45 PM
I don't read. Don't like books. Don't trust 'em. If I ever want to know something, I just look it up in my gut. It's never wrong.



Except, I like this one (http://www.healthyat100.org/). It's almost as good as my gut.

attackferret
11-21-2006, 10:55 PM
i read phillip pullman's his dark materials trilogy in the last 2 weeks (the golden compass, the subtle knife, and the amber spyglass). i quite enjoyed it, despite finding two of the three books at the library only in large print. very entertaining story :)

nchrysalis
11-27-2006, 03:21 PM
I am reading Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand..again(for the second time). I think I love it..most of it.

mamaquilla
11-27-2006, 03:35 PM
I just read The China Study, excellent, highly recommend especially for non-veggie folks :)

veganshawn
11-27-2006, 03:41 PM
I like this one (http://www.healthyat100.org/).

How is this book? I have not had a chance to read it yet, but look forward to it.

walrus
11-27-2006, 03:47 PM
I just finished reading "Angels and Demons." I liked it better than the other one, "The DaVinci Code," although both were entertaining.

I am now going to read "Breaking the Patterns of Depression" as recommended by stegan in another thread (http://www.veganrepresent.com/forums/showpost.php?p=169317&postcount=141).

Flower
11-27-2006, 03:57 PM
Diary by Chuck Pahliunak (sp?).

attackferret
11-27-2006, 05:01 PM
ender's game and seventh son by orson scott card. the problem is that they're both the first book of a series... should i read speaker for the dead next, or red prophet? decisions decisions.

i also read cat's cradle by vonnegut on thursday. i loved it.

nauthiz
11-27-2006, 05:40 PM
VRF

hazelfaern
11-27-2006, 09:10 PM
Jane Goodall's Reason for Hope, which is excellent.

Puttering About in a Small Land by PKD

Gorillas in the Mist by Diane Fossey

A Book of Luminous Things: An International Anthology of Poetry

Better Homes and Gardens Best Bread Machine Recipes

hazelfaern
12-02-2006, 12:13 AM
I just discovered the request button at the local library's website. Watch out!


Sermon on the Sea ~ Gandhi

Ghandi and Stalin ~ Fische

Gaia's Garden: A Guide to Homes Scale Permaculture ~ Hemenway

Alias Grace ~ Margaret Atwood

bluedawg
12-02-2006, 08:00 PM
i have FINALLY finished reading vegan: the new ethics of eating by erik marcus. i really liked it. it strikes me as a good book to loan to people who are curious about veganism--it covers health and animals and environment in sound ways, but it's an easy read. i'd like to read his newer book meat market now (i've been wanting to read it for a long time, but i'm stubborn and i didn't want to buy it until i'd read this one first).

in the meantime, i'm going to get started on introduction to animal rights: your child or the dog? by gary francione.

quagga
12-02-2006, 08:41 PM
I just finished re-reading The Last Unicorn by Peter S. Beagle. I still have my original copy from junior high school (1978!). It even has the fancy calligraphed bookplate that I pasted into the inside cover. It was as wonderful this time as the first time, even though I remembered virtually none of the details, except for the feeling of it.


Outside great gusts of rain growled round and round the castle walls...Nor was there any light, except for the meager glow of the cooking fire. It made the cat dozing in Molly's lap look like a heap of autumn leaves.


You were the one who taught me. I never looked at you without seeing the sweetness of the way the world goes together, or without sorrow for its spoiling.

hazelfaern
12-02-2006, 09:45 PM
i have FINALLY finished reading vegan: the new ethics of eating by erik marcus. i really liked it. it strikes me as a good book to loan to people who are curious about veganism--it covers health and animals and environment in sound ways, but it's an easy read. i'd like to read his newer book meat market now (i've been wanting to read it for a long time, but i'm stubborn and i didn't want to buy it until i'd read this one first).

in the meantime, i'm going to get started on introduction to animal rights: your child or the dog? by gary francione.

It bothered me a little bit that he began the book with a definition of vegan as someone who eats no animal products. In essence, throughout the book, he's really focused on diet, to the extent that I wouldn't be surprised if a person were truly shocked that vegans additionally avoid animal products that aren't food related as a near universal constant.

bluedawg
12-03-2006, 12:36 AM
It bothered me a little bit that he began the book with a definition of vegan as someone who eats no animal products. In essence, throughout the book, he's really focused on diet, to the extent that I wouldn't be surprised if a person were truly shocked that vegans additionally avoid animal products that aren't food related as a near universal constant.
interesting point! i hadn't really noticed that, or attended to it... probably in part because i read it over the span of several months(!)... but you're right, he does mainly focus on diet. in the final chapter where he recaps his own path to veganism, he mentions the leather thing, but that's all i remember at the moment.

veganshawn
12-03-2006, 09:50 AM
I didn't like his second book much, but it is worth reading.

Flower
12-06-2006, 08:31 PM
Just started Survivor by Chuck Palahniuk

mamaquilla
12-06-2006, 11:04 PM
Bill Bryson - In a Sunburned Country

Chijou_no_seiza
12-07-2006, 01:53 AM
VeJan wrote a book, and I'm going to start reading that this weekend. Supposedly it's about sh**, oh lovely vegan friends :D

jaxin
12-14-2006, 03:47 PM
Due to all the recent Peter Singer hoopla, and it being something I should have read long ago:

Animal Liberation by Peter Singer

Flower
12-14-2006, 04:13 PM
Cold Moon by Jeffery Deaver. I just started it and am already hooked.

rick green
12-25-2006, 07:55 PM
Mason & Dixon by Thomas Pynchon
The Bloodless Revolution by Tristram Stuart
Nativity Poems by Joseph Brodsky

hazelfaern
12-25-2006, 08:47 PM
The line divinding good and evil cuts through the heart of every human being. And who is willing to destroy a piece of his own heart?
- Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, The Gulag Archipelago v.I

Wow, that's one of my favorite quotes from one of my favorite books. And one I thought was fairly obscure. And I'm a bit confused by that 'v.I' -- my copy is paperback and just one volume in total. Is yours printed in multiple volumes?

How's Mason & Dixon?

rick green
12-25-2006, 09:18 PM
Mason Dixon is lot's of fun. It's my First Experience with Pynchon, but it won't be last. The Entire Tome is written in a Mock-archaic Style with plenty of Gratuitous Capitalization. He Takes the Piss out of the Founding Fathers, which is always an Admirable Undertaking. Ha ha. I'm about a Third of the Way through with Mason & Dixon recently arrived in America from their adventures Chronicling the Transit of Venus.

I think the Gulag Archipelago consists of seven books published in three volumes. I've only read the first volume, i.e. parts one and two. This deals with arrest, preliminary detention, trial, and transportation to the Gulag. I think life in the prison camp isn't really even examined until the third part.
It is a great book isn't it? Unfortunately, I can't think of any words to do it justice.

What other books do you like?

hazelfaern
12-25-2006, 09:53 PM
Mason Dixon is lot's of fun. It's my First Experience with Pynchon, but it won't be last. The Entire Tome is written in a Mock-archaic Style with plenty of Gratuitous Capitalization. He Takes the Piss out of the Founding Fathers, which is always an Admirable Undertaking. Ha ha. I'm about a Third of the Way through with Mason & Dixon recently arrived in America from their adventures Chronicling the Transit of Venus.

I think the Gulag Archipelago consists of seven books published in three volumes. I've only read the first volume, i.e. parts one and two. This deals with arrest, preliminary detention, trial, and transportation to the Gulag. I think life in the prison camp isn't really even examined until the third part.
It is a great book isn't it? Unfortunately, I can't think of any words to do it justice.

What other books do you like?

This is interesting. I pulled down my copy and both the spine and cover read "The Gulag Archipeligo" but the title page has the included but subtle "I-II". Never noticed that before.

So I turned to trusty Wikepedia and found (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Gulag_Archipelago):


Structurally, the work is made up of seven sections divided (in most printed editions) into three volumes: pt 1-2, pt 3-4, pt 5-7.

Which means I have 1,200 more pages left to read before I've finished this book! :o Well, no wonder it seemed to end so abruptly!

For history, I'm fond of Will and Ariel Durant (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Will_Durant), but then I enjoy big fat history books, generally. I love Margaret Atwood but she makes me cry. I devour Phillip K. Dick on occasional binges. Recently I've been reading the poetry of Rumi (from The Essential Rumi) interspersed with snippits of The Bagavad Gita, a book about Permaculture and some web investigation of local CSAs. :D

I'm a big fan of Gratuitous, Psuedo-Archaic Capitalization Done Well :silly: -- it's so Imminently Victorian, yet it makes me think of A. E. Milne. I'll have to check out Mason & Dixon soon. :)