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grog
04-26-2005, 05:20 PM
Recently read on the prison boat, I mean cruise.

Sailing to Sarantium and Lord of Emperors, by Guy Gavrial Kay. Romanish fantasy , with good bits about Mosaicists.

Dune: House Atreides and Dune: House Harkonnen. Herbert and Anderson. Good Dune Stuff.

mandrake
04-26-2005, 06:03 PM
I'm currently reading Planet Law School II, Fast Food Nation and Bobos in Paradise (again)

Tofuy
04-26-2005, 07:39 PM
lots and lots and lots of text books an library books. late april and mid december are evil times for stuidents. evil evil times...

jenzie
04-26-2005, 07:58 PM
lots and lots and lots of text books an library books. late april and mid december are evil times for stuidents. evil evil times...

Evil times for students on the semester system. You guys have it easy! Those of us of the quarter system suffer in December, March, June, and if we take summer courses, August. Ouch. :blank:

vegbrain
04-29-2005, 08:37 PM
A Million Little Pieces by James Frey. Poignant and darkly honest.

Noteworthy dabblings in:
Italo Calvino, Phiippe Levine, and Charles Bukowski

Next up: Zen and The Art of Motorcycle Maintenance/Vonnegut's 'Cat's Cradle'

oldradical
04-29-2005, 08:46 PM
Most of the reading I do anymore is online. I have two library books at hand: The Origins of the Second World War, by AJP Taylor; and Will They Ever Trust Us Again? Letters from the War Zone, by Michael Moore.

theveganmary
04-29-2005, 09:10 PM
I'm still rereading Zop Wallop, by William Browning Spencer, and I also just started reading Thoughts Without a Thinker, by Mark Epstein, M.D. It's a book dealing with psychotherapy from a Buddhist perspective.

attackferret
04-29-2005, 11:25 PM
Before 8 am monday: memorizing Molecular Biology of the Gene (5th edition).

After finals I think I'm going to read the rest of my Pushkin short story collection

Emiloid
04-30-2005, 01:44 AM
After finals I think I'm going to read the rest of my Pushkin short story collectionWow, Pushkin! I haven't heard that name since I got back from Russia. :D Funny, he seems to be practically unknown here in the US, but he is one of Russia's most beloved writers.

downwithapathy
04-30-2005, 01:48 AM
I don't know much Pushkin, but I quite like "Eugene Onegin". It makes me think I might be missing out. :)

attackferret
04-30-2005, 09:58 AM
I got the impression that Pushkin has been all but deified in Russia. My roommate was a russian major (and now she's about to go back to Russia on a Fulbright, teaching english and being a street musician :o ). Anyhow, her enthusiasm is contagious :)

And Sonja.. did you read Eugene Onegin or see the opera when it was here? It's the only opera I've ever been to... I feel bad, but I was bored. Plus, the english translation was distracting. Since then, I've heard it's not the best opera to go to as a newbie, so I should give opera a second try. We shall see.

(sorry for the slight thread derailment)

stegan
04-30-2005, 11:40 AM
Breaking The Patterns of Depression- Michael Yapko

He's a strange duck- a hypnotherapist by trade, but knows what he's talking about. And there was the one reference to Dr. Laura, but I'll give him that one. Good insights.

SillyGoose
04-30-2005, 12:28 PM
Currently reading (and almost finished with) "Reefer Madness" by Eric Schlosser. Interesting stuff.

Just finished reading "The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test" by Tom Wolfe. I read it right after Aldous Huxley's "The Doors of Perception", which seemed like a perfect primer for Acid Test. Both books made me want to take copious amounts of illegal drugs.

FarmerStephen
04-30-2005, 12:42 PM
Hi Everyone,
To anyone who has'nt read it, I highly recomend 'Wicked', the story of how the Wicked Witch of the West, became Wicked. It's filled with political intrigue, vegetarianism, animal testing, social conflict & alienation, one of my all time favorite fictions. It's by Gregory MacGuire, and he has made a name for himself doing the 'Before' storie to popular childrens tales. He also did one about Cinderella, Ebenezer Scrooge, and he has a new one I have'nt read yet. But I definately reccomend 'Wicked'. You will pass it on to a friend when you're done.

Thanks to this thread, I'll have no money for the next 3 months, as I now have a gazillion books to get.

O yeah, if your into language at all, On a non-fiction note, I reccomend 'The Meaning of Everything, the Story of the Oxford English Dictionary'. It is really interesting, and led me to 2 Biographies of some crrraaaazy dudes.....

trichaos
04-30-2005, 01:46 PM
FarmerStephen- everytime I see Wicked in the bookstore, I think to myself that it looks interesting. After reading your recommendation, I'm definitely gonna get it. Thanks

grog
04-30-2005, 01:47 PM
O yeah, if your into language at all, On a non-fiction note, I reccomend 'The Meaning of Everything, the Story of the Oxford English Dictionary'. It is really interesting, and led me to 2 Biographies of some crrraaaazy dudes.....

I've read "The Professor and the Madman: A Tale of Murder, Insanity, and the Making of The Oxford English Dictionary" by the same author, which was a great little book.

gladcow
04-30-2005, 11:07 PM
Hi Everyone,
To anyone who has'nt read it, I highly recomend 'Wicked', the story of how the Wicked Witch of the West, became Wicked. It's filled with political intrigue, vegetarianism, animal testing, social conflict & alienation, one of my all time favorite fictions. It's by Gregory MacGuire, and he has made a name for himself doing the 'Before' storie to popular childrens tales. He also did one about Cinderella, Ebenezer Scrooge, and he has a new one I have'nt read yet. But I definately reccomend 'Wicked'. You will pass it on to a friend when you're done.

I've read all of Gregory Maguire's books. Wicked is by far the best. Second best is the one about Snow White and then the one about Cinderella. Highly recommend!!

downwithapathy
04-30-2005, 11:38 PM
And Sonja.. did you read Eugene Onegin or see the opera when it was here? It's the only opera I've ever been to... I feel bad, but I was bored. Plus, the english translation was distracting. Since then, I've heard it's not the best opera to go to as a newbie, so I should give opera a second try. We shall see.
Both! I go to every opera that happens in this town, and I actually liked that one quite a lot. :) ...which is what led me to the reading.

FarmerStephen
05-01-2005, 12:55 AM
I've read all of Gregory Maguire's books. Wicked is by far the best. Second best is the one about Snow White and then the one about Cinderella. Highly recommend!!

Oh yeah, Wicked is a broadway play now, or it was. Supposedly very successful, never came to helL.A. or S.F. though, so I never got to see it. And the Cinderella book is called ' Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister', the Scrooge one is called ' Lost ' , & I do'nt know the name of the Snow White one, it's the one I have'nt read. But ' Wicked ' is the real masterpiece. And GladCow has the right spelling of his name, not me.

attackferret
05-01-2005, 06:25 PM
I loved Wicked, although I haven't read it in years. I gave my little sister Wicked and Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister for her birthday last fall, and haven't managed to steal 'Confessions' yet. I hope to do so sometime this summer :)

dropscone
05-01-2005, 06:45 PM
My neighbours gave me their spare copy of Jane Grigson's vegetable book. There are a *lot* of meaty recipes in there as well - she seems to think that bacon goes with virtually all veg, but there are also a lot of nice and unusual vegetable dishes that are either vegan or more or less easily veganised.

I have resolved to make better use of my garden and try growing something interesting :)

By the way trichaos - I hope you realise you've got "when doves cry" stuck in my head now :brood:

trichaos
05-01-2005, 07:49 PM
By the way trichaos - I hope you realise you've got "when doves cry" stuck in my head now :brood:
It was playing on the radio when I took my dog to the park earlier. Glad I could share in the joy. :D

jenzie
05-01-2005, 09:21 PM
Reading, for school: Ceremony by Leslie Marmon Silko

Kinda slow thus far... :umm:

grog
05-01-2005, 10:01 PM
Reading, for school: Ceremony by Leslie Marmon Silko

Kinda slow thus far... :umm:

I recently, like two years ago ;) finished that. I had read half of it about 10 years ago and it disturbed me so I stopped. Its gotta interesting twist at the end. I can't remember if I thought it was slow to start or not.

Emiloid
05-02-2005, 01:27 AM
Reading, for school: Ceremony by Leslie Marmon Silko

Kinda slow thus far... :umm:I had to read that in college and realy enjoyed it.

I'm continuing on my quest to read every Newberry Award winning book I can find. Right now I'm reading Bud, Not Buddy which won in 2000. So far it's really good.

jenzie
05-02-2005, 10:48 AM
I recently, like two years ago ;) finished that. I had read half of it about 10 years ago and it disturbed me so I stopped. Its gotta interesting twist at the end. I can't remember if I thought it was slow to start or not.


I had to read that in college and realy enjoyed it.

Well, that's encouraging! I'll report back once I finish. :)

kikkert
05-02-2005, 12:12 PM
Ceremony by Leslie Marmon Silko

I picked that up a few years ago at my favorite gently used, overstock, etc bookstore. I got a strange bag of books that day.... A Collection of Beauties at the Height of Their Popularity, Justine, The Rose City, Burning Girl, Carter Clay, and others.

Anyway, I thought it was slow to start, too. I had to make a point to read several pages at a time to get through it in the beginning. Then I couldn't put it down and absolutely loved it by the end.

Angelus71
05-02-2005, 07:31 PM
AdiaStar and I are reading "The New Vegan" by Janet Hudson. It's a cook book, and it's full of great recipes.

oldradical
05-12-2005, 04:06 PM
i'm reading (in the middle of all of them):

guns, germs, and steel is really interesting. it's about the hows and whys of white europeans being able to "conquer" almost everybody else on earth (written by someone who thinks white europeans are stupider and physically weaker than native peoples--yay! so true). but it's also kind of annoying because he's one of those people that writes in what i like to call the "spoon-feeding" style. he reiterates everything so that even the dumbest person can understand his point. gets a little boring for people who can understand his point without the repetition. :D

Yeah, well, that's probably because he figures most of his customers who buy the book will be white. We can't all be nonwhite, y' know, so things have to be explained in a "For Dummies" style. :rolleyes:

theveganmary
05-12-2005, 07:22 PM
i am reading wheels of life by anodea judith and evasion released by the crimethinc collective. i highly recommend both.
The crimethinc collective ROCKS!

mamaquilla
05-12-2005, 07:25 PM
Just finished Raising Vegan Children in a Non-Vegan World by Erin Pavlina

Lots of good info. :happy:

spidermonkey
05-30-2005, 08:28 AM
Crush Step 3 (for the second time) I better go study! :worried:

runningrl
05-30-2005, 08:45 AM
I am reading: "Noi che ci vogliamo cosi' bene" (something like: Us, who love each other so much) by Marcela Serrano (she's from Chile). In spite of the cheesy title, it's about guerrilla in Chiapas. She always finds those mushy titles and then goes on talking about politics! Love her! :)

On another note: The Spiral Dance by Starhawk

ETA: reading the "Fresh at home "cookbook :happy: too (haven't cooked anything yet tho, have to find out where to buy nutritional yeast...)

oldradical
05-30-2005, 10:00 AM
Running, I recommend Starhawk's Dreaming The Dark; if I had to recommend one and only one book about witchcraft, that would be the book I'd name. I say that notwithstanding the fact that I found Starhawk personally insufferable, when I met her.

Now to the topic: I just finished a book about the AOL-Time Warner merger, entitlted Fools Rush In. It was pretty good, especially if you're interested in the background and personality of some of the major players. As I have so often before, the major impression I received was just how toxic the culture of high-level business typically is.

I'm most of the way through My Brother's Shadow: A Life and Death in the SS, by Uwe Timm. It is based on a short, handwritten diary written by the author's older brother, who served, was injured, and then died of his wounds while in the SS Death's Head Division, in Russia. The author's reflections alternately range back and forth from his brother's diary, his own recollections from the war/post-war period (he was about four years old during the war, as I recall), and memories and anecdotes of various family members and associates. I'm most of the way through this modest-length book, and it is sufficiently interesting that I'll finish it.

I'm a bit more than half way through Paper Fan: The Hunt for Triad Gangster Steven Wong, which has been something of a pleasant surprise. This is not the sort of thing I usually read, but having some familiarity with Chinese culture (I've been to the PRC twice, used to speak serviceable Mandarin, etc.), I thought I'd give it a try. The "protagonist" of the piece, the gangster, is interesting enough, but the most interesting features have been the descriptions of the various countries/cultures visited by the author, a journalist trying to help police arrest Steven Wong; and his descriptions of the bureaucratic indifference, incompetence, and often outright corruption of governments and police supposedly engaged in suppressing high-level international criminals. He gives a good account of the background and reach of the triads, the criminal cartels based in the Orient and their domestic extensions in places like Vancouver, BC, where this story begins.

Yet to be read but at hand, is Buddha's Warriors, which is about the CIA-backed Tibetan guerrillas and the forced incorporation of Tibet into the mainland Chinese government. There is a foreward by the Dalai Lama. Not having read it, I can't comment on the book.

stegan
05-30-2005, 10:18 AM
Just finished "Are You Dave Gorman", which a friend had lent me. Uproariously funny and ultimately pointless. The perfect summer reading book. I did have several people look at me like I was crazy when I was laughing in the airports though :)

bluedawg
05-30-2005, 10:32 AM
i just finished reading being vegan, which was a quick and interesting-enough read.

now i'm onto obligate carnivore, which i am really enjoying.

attackferret
05-30-2005, 11:12 AM
I'm reading The Brother's Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky. I tried reading it once before, but I have a different translation now and it's 8 million times better. Now it both makes sense and is fun to read! For anyone interested, the good translation is the purple Bantam Classic translated by Andrew R. MacAndrew.

gladcow
05-30-2005, 11:33 AM
Recently finished "12,000 Miles in the Nick of Time" by Mark Jacobson. It's about a family that travels around the world together. Very good.
Finishing now "Demon in the Freezer" by Richard Preston

runningrl
05-30-2005, 11:38 AM
oldradical, thanks for the reccomandation, I'll think about that after I am done with this one. I find that, although I am familiar with most of the concepts she talks about, b/c I kinda studied religious anthropology, her writing is not easy to read. True, it's not my native language, but I don't always have difficulties in reading in english.
I am surprised she is not pleasant in real life, she seems very "democratic" in the way she leads her covens.

Hey, are you familiar with south american literatire?

thanks again!

oldradical
05-30-2005, 12:38 PM
Running, "American literature" is a biiiiiig area. I'm sure you know that. So...was there anything in particular that you might have had in mind when you asked about my familiarity with the subject?

As for Starhawk: it was a real disappointment to me to find that, while her political blather seemed equitable enough, she immediately struck me as being a "Marie Antoinette" character. Sometimes people advocate things that are not congruent with their personal manner. Too, she might be different towards women. Wicca is a mixed bag: you will find a high degree of personal autonomy and near-anarchic insistence on personal freedom, but at the same time, there are lots of hierarchies, "levels," and the like--if you care to honor them.

Her tradition--reclaiming--is very hierarchical. I find this far more in keeping with the person I met than with the one who seemed to be in her books.

runningrl
05-30-2005, 02:12 PM
oldradical, I guess for Marie Antoinette you mean somehow a diva?

I meant south american literature, I was thinking in particular about Garcia Marquez or Jorge Amado, among others. I find them more appreciated in Europe than here...?

grog
05-30-2005, 02:28 PM
I meant south american literature, I was thinking in particular about Garcia Marquez or Jorge Amado, among others. I find them more appreciated in Europe than here...?

I've read "Cien años de soledad" (100 years of solitude" and "El Colonel quien no le escribe" (No one writes to the colonel) Which were great. I read some books by Isabella Allende too, can't recall which. I think, in general, Magical Realism is too abstract and non-linear for us dumb Norte Americanos.

runningrl
05-30-2005, 02:31 PM
I think, in general, Magical Realism is too abstract and non-linear for us dumb Norte Americanos.

It wasn't easy at all to get used to that.
I think the more books like that you read the more aquainted you become with that way of thinking, it's not a matter of dumbness, just familiarity.

I haven't read the second one, I hear is good. The book I love the most from Garcia Marquez is "Of love and other demons" (or something like that).

jenzie
05-30-2005, 03:17 PM
Recently finished Ceremony by Silko (good stuff!), and Jazz by Toni Morrison.

Right now I'm reading Typical American by Gish Jen. Next up, Mona in the Promised Land. I'm in love with this author! :D

grog
05-30-2005, 03:29 PM
Recently finished Ceremony by Silko (good stuff!)

Ah, I had been wondering what your final thoughts were on it, glad it worked out for you. My deep thought on it was, that the very book itself, is a Ceremony, if ya dig.

oldradical
05-30-2005, 04:10 PM
Running, now that I understand your question...I have read almost nothing by Latin authors. This is largely due to the fact that I read very little fiction. Even in reading about the area--its politics, for example--most of what I have read has been written by non-Latin authors.

That doesn't bother me, though, so long as something is well-written and is useful to me.

Hope that answers your question.

Tofuy
05-30-2005, 04:20 PM
Recently finished Ceremony by Silko (good stuff!), and Jazz by Toni Morrison. Right now I'm reading Typical American by Gish Jen. Next up, Mona in the Promised Land. I'm in love with this author! :D

:o i read Ceremony for one of my school projects last semester. i also read Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison and Typical American for another one of my classes! egad! :o after reading Typical American, we read Native Speaker by Chang-Rae Lee. both are novels about asian american identity in NYC. i thought Native Speaker was a much better book and i strongly suggest it!

we've been covering the greek and christian creation myths in my mythologies class and lots of other creation myths. i'm reading yeats in connection with my harlem renaissance class, which is turning out to be a very cool pairing to examine modernism.

my personal reading, at the moment, is Noble House by James Clavell(again, for the umpteenth time)

jenzie
05-30-2005, 05:32 PM
:o i read Ceremony for one of my school projects last semester. i also read Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison and Typical American for another one of my classes! egad! :o after reading Typical American, we read Native Speaker by Chang-Rae Lee. both are novels about asian american identity in NYC. i thought Native Speaker was a much better book and i strongly suggest it!

Yeah, I'm reading all of these books for my current class. Native Speaker is good, but eh, I like Gish Jen's style more. Also... I wouldn't necessarily say Typical American is about "asian american identity in NYC"... it's an immigrant story about adapting to life in the US, and the cultural divide between Chinese and American ways of living.

But aaaanyway. :)

Tofuy
05-30-2005, 05:50 PM
that's definatly a closer description. but i'm biased, because anything involving nyc must of course be about nyc... :p

hurry and finish Gish Jen so we can chat about them!

attackferret
05-30-2005, 07:53 PM
runningrl - I have a very limited knowledge of Latin American literature, but I read Like Water For Chocolate by Laura Esquivel last year and adored it. It's a magical realism book that is a very quick, easy, and accessable read. You should check it out :)

spidermonkey
05-30-2005, 08:02 PM
runningrl - I have a very limited knowledge of Latin American literature, but I read Like Water For Chocolate by Laura Esquivel last year and adored it. It's a magical realism book that is a very quick, easy, and accessable read. You should check it out :)I saw the movie a long time ago and remember liking it. I'm not sure how it compares to the book, but you should check it out. :)

mandrake
06-02-2005, 07:50 AM
I'm reading Wicked right now. Has anybody read this? The Wicked Witch of the West is actually an animal rights activist. It's pretty cool.

jenzie
06-02-2005, 11:03 AM
Moving from Typical American to Mona in the Promised Land, both by Gish Jen.

:thumbsup:

gladcow
06-02-2005, 11:37 AM
I'm reading Wicked right now. Has anybody read this? The Wicked Witch of the West is actually an animal rights activist. It's pretty cool.
yup. It's real good. Maguire's best, IMHO

mandrake
06-02-2005, 02:16 PM
This is the first one of his books that I've read. It's a gift from my mother. Do you recommend his other novels?

Tofuy
06-02-2005, 09:10 PM
has anyone read Invisible Monsters (http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0393319296/ref=sib_fs_top/102-8662407-4160135?%5Fencoding=UTF8&p=S00F&checkSum=dXDFLun4LsllaJ0oTAB2pJulvqQ4Kr0P6HvRhXN%2 BnTs%3D#reader-link) by Chuck Palahniuk? start reading, get hooked, enjoy.

gladcow
06-02-2005, 10:06 PM
This is the first one of his books that I've read. It's a gift from my mother. Do you recommend his other novels?
Tentative yes. They are all good, even really good. But none is as good as Wicked, so there is a bit of a let-down. But if you go into it knowing that, they will be more enjoyable. Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister and the newest one based on Snow White are both very good.

FarmerStephen
06-03-2005, 02:06 AM
I'm reading Wicked right now. Has anybody read this? The Wicked Witch of the West is actually an animal rights activist. It's pretty cool.

Excellent Book. Correction though, She's an Animal rights activist, not an animal rights activist. Think winged Monkeys :umm: ............

The other Greg Mac books, mediocre compared to the greatness of Wicked.......

attackferret
06-09-2005, 11:25 AM
I finished The Brothers Karamazov, and I highly, highly recommend it (but get the Purple Bantam Classic translated by Andrew R. MacAndrew!). It's definitely one of the best books I have ever read. I just wish I'd read more Gogol and more Pushkin poetry first; I feel I missed a fair number of references. I also wish I spoke French. I'm starting Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy, and I'm going to wish I spoke French even more by the time I'm done.

Also, for a book club with the Timmy Foundation (http://www.indiana.edu/~timmyfc/), I'm about to start reading the book Mountains Beyond Mountains by Tracy Kidder. It's a biography of Paul Farmer, a doctor specializing in infectious diseases, and his work to improve health care in Haiti.

Emiloid
06-09-2005, 04:48 PM
I finished The Brothers Karamazov, and I highly, highly recommend it (but get the Purple Bantam Classic translated by Andrew R. MacAndrew!). It's definitely one of the best books I have ever read. I just wish I'd read more Gogol and more Pushkin poetry first; I feel I missed a fair number of references. I also wish I spoke French. I'm starting Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy, and I'm going to wish I spoke French even more by the time I'm done.

I :heart: Russian literature! Anna Karenina is one of the best books I've ever read. And I read most of it in Russia. :cool:

carnelian
06-09-2005, 05:00 PM
Meat Market by Erik Marcus

dropscone
06-09-2005, 05:31 PM
I've just finished Last Chance to See by Douglas Adams and Mark Carwardine, which was also a radio series (though I didn't hear it) - in which they go to various places looking for animals on the brink of extinction.

At the start of the book you can definitely recognise the Douglas Adams bits, but I don't know whether because it's a collaboration or because they went to many of the same places, but later on in the book I wouldn't have been able to tell it wasn't a Gerald Durrell book for most of the time. Not that that's a bad thing.

Very good book, I'd definitely recommend it.

Oatmeal Girl
06-09-2005, 06:27 PM
has anyone read Invisible Monsters (http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0393319296/ref=sib_fs_top/102-8662407-4160135?%5Fencoding=UTF8&p=S00F&checkSum=dXDFLun4LsllaJ0oTAB2pJulvqQ4Kr0P6HvRhXN%2 BnTs%3D#reader-link) by Chuck Palahniuk? start reading, get hooked, enjoy.

Crazy book!

There are sooo many surprises in that book. I loved it!

feline01
06-14-2005, 04:36 PM
I'm reading The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon. One of the best books I've read in ages. His writing is phenomenal. I wish I could read fluently in Spanish so I could read the original version, things always get messed up during translations.

atouria
06-14-2005, 11:10 PM
I just did a review of The Kite Runner on my blog. I really enjoyed this book!

www.yarnyoga.com

I also have recently read Never Let me Go, which is a wonderful book, but a completely different tone than the kite runner. it addresses the issue of cloning by letting us in on the lives of clones that attend this 'special' school.

I'm currently reading the starbucks book, Pour Your Heart Into it.

The Brothers Karamazov is next on my list!

lex_talionis
06-15-2005, 07:55 AM
I've just finished Last Chance to See by Douglas Adams and Mark Carwardine,
great book.

9nines
06-15-2005, 08:11 AM
I am about two thirds finished with "Cloud Atlas", authored by David Mitchell.

I highly recommended it:

1) Unique style - each long chapter, is from different perspectives, in different settings (both time and place) and it seems all the stories will come together (I have not got there yet.) Also, each long chapter is different syntax and prose; it is very clever.

2) Philosophy is good. For example he writes, "Yay, Old Uns' mastered sicks, miles, seeds, an' made miracles ordinary, but it din't master on thing, nay a hunger in the hearts o'humans yay, a hunger for more" when a survivor, of the Fall, was describing what happened to civilization, to a Valleyman. This is also an example of the many different styles, in syntax and words, he uses.

misanthropy
06-15-2005, 09:10 AM
I finally got my copy of Merchants of Misery (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1567510825/qid=1118841095/sr=8-1/ref=pd_csp_1/102-6779082-8800168?v=glance&s=books&n=507846). It was really hard to get since it's out of print. The publisher had to see if a copy would be sent back by a bookstore. Finally, a copy was available.

attackferret
06-15-2005, 09:36 AM
The Brothers Karamazov is next on my list! Yay! Just remember: read the purple bantam. No other will do :)

I finished Mountains Beyond Mountains. I highly recommend it to anyone, particularly those interested in medicine/humanitarian work in third world countries.

grog
06-15-2005, 06:00 PM
I'm reading Ender's Game, by Orson Scott Card. I'd always seen in referenced as one of the "big" sciFi books, but somehow never read it. I picked it up yesterday and was up until 1am reading it :happy: It's awesome, its like finding out there's one more cookie left in the cookie jar when you thought they were all gone.

Nanashi
06-15-2005, 07:02 PM
I'm reading Ender's Game, by Orson Scott Card. I'd always seen in referenced as one of the "big" sciFi books, but somehow never read it. I picked it up yesterday and was up until 1am reading it :happy: It's awesome, its like finding out there's one more cookie left in the cookie jar when you thought they were all gone.

Ender's Shadow is another cookie.

Tofuy
06-15-2005, 07:24 PM
i'm reading a john erving book right now, setting free the bears. there's some interesting parallels about control and about choice. what makes us good?

Tofuy
06-15-2005, 07:25 PM
I'm reading Ender's Game, by Orson Scott Card. I'd always seen in referenced as one of the "big" sciFi books, but somehow never read it. I picked it up yesterday and was up until 1am reading it :happy: It's awesome, its like finding out there's one more cookie left in the cookie jar when you thought they were all gone.
i LOVED enders game! it reads so simply and yet has such depth... :happy:

grog
06-16-2005, 08:17 PM
i LOVED enders game! it reads so simply and yet has such depth... :happy:

It was good stuff! I'll have to read the sequels now. Also, they are making a movie (http://www.frescopictures.com/movies/ender/index.html)! I'll keep my fingers crossed it doesn't blow, but it probably will, seems hard to translate to the silver screen correctly.

Mason
06-16-2005, 08:32 PM
It was good stuff! I'll have to read the sequels now. Also, they are making a movie (http://www.frescopictures.com/movies/ender/index.html)! I'll keep my fingers crossed it doesn't blow, but it probably will, seems hard to translate to the silver screen correctly.The sequels are excellent but it's hard to do a comparison because they are nothing like the first book. I've heard rumors of a movie for years. I've also come across the idea for a mini-series - which might lend itself better to the story.

bluedawg
06-27-2005, 10:11 PM
just finished:
obligate carnivore: cats, dogs, and what it really means to be vegan, which was funny, informative, and fascinating all at once. i have a lot to think about. i will probably post soon in the vegan cats/evolution thread(s).

the curious incident of the dog in the night-time, which i'm glad i finally read. i'd heard good things for quite some time and it just felt like one of those books i "should" read. i liked it. if you're not familiar with it, it's a novel written from the POV of a 15-year-old boy with autism.

about to start:
the pig who sang to the moon: the emotional world of farm animals, which i put on my birthday list due to several recommendations here. i'm hoping to get going on that tonight.

still on my nightstand:
dominion. i really have to be in the mood, but i like it in principle. i keep it there for evenings when i'm feeling particularly up for it. otherwise i read the less intense stuff.

hawaiigirl
06-27-2005, 10:15 PM
what book are you currently reading? what do you think of it? would you recommend it?

i am reading Animal Farm by George Orwell. I am only halfway through, and I am greatly enjoying it. I can't believe I haven't read this already. (so many books to read!) Basically, the animals kick out the abusive farmer and take over. I would definitely recommend it. (as well as 1984 , by the same author)

FYI-George Orwell has a nice collection of essays too!

seitanicvegan
06-27-2005, 10:23 PM
about to start:
the pig who sang to the moon: the emotional lives of farm animals, which i put on my birthday list due to several recommendations here. i'm hoping to get going on that tonight.

still on my nightstand:
dominion. i really have to be in the mood, but i like it in principle. i keep it there for evenings when i'm feeling particularly up for it. otherwise i read the less intense stuff.

Hey, I have The Pig Who Sang to the Moon (and When Elephants Weep) and Dominion. I would be very interested in hearing your thoughts on these books. I haven't had a chance to read them yet, but they're close to the top of my very large pile of must-reads.

I'm trying to finish The Pornography of Meat. It's slow going because it gets overwhelmingly depressing. I have to take it in small batches. I want to read something with a *Happy Ending* next. :umm:

gladcow
06-27-2005, 10:45 PM
Just finished:
Small Mediums at Large
True story of a family of psychics. Really good.

Just started:
Nobody's Home: Candid Reflections of a Nursing Home Aide
Good so far, but a little sad.

gladcow
06-27-2005, 10:47 PM
just finished:
obligate carnivore: cats, dogs, and what it really means to be vegan, which was funny, informative, and fascinating all at once. i have a lot to think about. i will probably post soon in the vegan cats/evolution thread(s).

the curious incident of the dog in the night-time, which i'm glad i finally read. i'd heard good things for quite some time and it just felt like one of those books i "should" read. i liked it. if you're not familiar with it, it's a novel written from the POV of a 15-year-old boy with autism.

I gotta read Obligate Carnivore.....

I liked the curious incident, too.

grog
06-27-2005, 11:04 PM
Just finished:

The Compleat Enchanter (http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/nonfiction/compleat.htm) by L. Sprague deCamp and Fletcher Pratt. Sorta the godfathers of Terry Pratchett and Christopher Stasheff and other sorta funny fantasy stuff.

kikkert
06-28-2005, 12:05 PM
the curious incident of the dog in the night-time, which i'm glad i finally read.
I thought that novel was really enjoyable to read. (For some reason, it made me think of Carter Clay, which is a novel I would recommend reading for different reasons - disturbing perhaps, not exactly enjoyable, but worthwhile.)

Oh, has anyone else read My Year in Meats by Ruth Ozeki? I really liked the style and tone of her writing.

kikkert
06-28-2005, 12:13 PM
Hey, I have The Pig Who Sang to the Moon (and When Elephants Weep)
I want to read both of those books too. I think Poisoned Chickens Poisoned Eggs, The Emperor's Embrace, Dogs Never Lie About Love, and The Nine Emotional Lives of Cats are by the same author or from the same publishing company. I've been trying to find them in local public libraries so I do not have to buy them all to read them.


I'm trying to finish The Pornography of Meat. It's slow going because it gets overwhelmingly depressing. I have to take it in small batches.
It's a difficult work, indeed, but so valuable.

attackferret
06-28-2005, 12:34 PM
Oh, has anyone else read My Year in Meats by Ruth Ozeki? I really liked the style and tone of her writing.My Year in Meats was one of the books in an old roommates' comp lit class. I have no idea what else they were looking at which related to it. In any event, I borrowed it. I liked that it was a quick read which outlined many problems with factory farms and slaughterhouses that the average person wouldn't think about without being horribly in your face about it.

stegan
06-28-2005, 12:56 PM
the curious incident of the dog in the night-time, which i'm glad i finally read. i'd heard good things for quite some time and it just felt like one of those books i "should" read. i liked it. if you're not familiar with it, it's a novel written from the POV of a 15-year-old boy with autism.

I'm a sucker for unusual narrative devices anyways, but really and truly enjoyed this book. It was very much in a Nick Hornby style pacing-wise (which I don't mean in a bad way at all), and it had enough surprising moments to make you want to read it in one sitting. Both good things :)

mamaquilla
06-28-2005, 02:57 PM
What if Buddha were Stuck =]

JasonSt
06-30-2005, 09:53 PM
I'm now reading Chuck Palahniuk's new novel, "Haunted." It is f'in graphic. People have been vomiting and fainting at his readings and now I know why. It's causing me physical pain. Don't get me wrong, it is a very good read so far, just...find out for yourself.

jenzie
06-30-2005, 09:57 PM
I'm now reading Chuck Palahniuk's new novel, "Haunted." It is f'in graphic. People have been vomiting and fainting at his readings and now I know why. It's causing me physical pain. Don't get me wrong, it is a very good read so far, just...find out for yourself.

Wow... I'm not sure what to think about that. :confused: (Not going to one of his readings, that's for sure! :p)

Husky Corn Star
07-01-2005, 04:51 AM
Jean-Paul Sartre - 'The Reprieve'

dropscone
07-01-2005, 11:15 AM
Oh, has anyone else read My Year in Meats by Ruth Ozeki? I really liked the style and tone of her writing.

Oh, I loved that book! I thought it put a lot of interesting facts into an engrossing story. I bookcrossed it when I went to France (left it in the chalet bookshelf with a bookcrossing bookmark and the ID number) but nobody has ever said they caught it :umm:

I'm trying to get through 'A short history of nearly everything' by Bill Bryson at the moment. It's interesting but the info isn't really sticking. I guess I just don't have a science head :(

stegan
07-01-2005, 11:20 AM
currently re-reading Jon Stewart- "Naked Pictures of Famous People". I was feeling a bit low in the sarcasm department, so... :happy:

mandrake
07-02-2005, 02:39 PM
I don't know how I feel about this book yet. I'm only on page 120 and it seems there's a lot more to it, so I'm witholding judgment.

mandrake
07-02-2005, 02:47 PM
Excellent Book. Correction though, She's an Animal rights activist, not an animal rights activist. Think winged Monkeys :umm: ............

The other Greg Mac books, mediocre compared to the greatness of Wicked.......

Actually, I was making a joke, but since you mention it...

Yeah, she fights for Animal rights, but toward the end of the book she starts experimenting with her monkey (an animal) and concludes that Animals, animals and humans are all very similar. I think the book brings up some very interesting questions about animal rights and spirituality even though Elphaba is only explicitly concerned with Animals.

I think I'm going to skip the rest of his books. I have a stack of other books to read before law school that I'm more interested in. :-)

attackferret
07-13-2005, 11:11 PM
To satisfy the requirements of this thread, I recently read Trickster's Choice and Trickster's Queen by Tamora Pierce. She writes fantasy involving strong heroines aimed at.. middle schoolers? I'm not sure, really. Whoever they're for, all the books I've read by her have been entertaining.

To go slightly off topic.. I'm trying to figure out what book to read next. After attending a few meetings of a group which discusses issues of global poverty/health related issues, I've been forced to confront the fact that I am woefully ignorant on history (both world and US), economics, and all things political. I'm also horribly ignorant on cultural anthropology/sociology/religious studies. I'd like to read a few books which would help me obtain a better foundation for talking about international health, environmental, and sustainable development issues (or environmental justice, if anyone knows anything). I'm thinking about starting off with The World is Flat by Thomas L. Friedman or The End of Poverty by Jeffrey Sachs, possibly followed by Guns, Germs, and Steel or Collapse by Jared Diamond.

If you have read any of those books or have another book to recommend, let me know! Thanks :)

Emiloid
07-14-2005, 12:11 AM
attackferret, I haven't read Collapse (yet), but I'd recommend anything by Jared Diamond. Guns, Germs, and Steel is amazing. So is The Third Chimpanzee.

That's my two cents.

Right now I'm reading Developmental Psychology: Child & Adolescence (a textbook) for school. Pretty neat stuff!

lex_talionis
07-14-2005, 07:17 AM
The Non-Local Universe (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0195144082/qid=1121343285/sr=8-1/ref=pd_bbs_ur_1/002-9714180-1153653?v=glance&s=books&n=507846), Robert Nadeau, Menas Kafatos and The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0060012358/qid=1121343371/sr=8-1/ref=pd_bbs_ur_1/002-9714180-1153653?v=glance&s=books&n=507846), Terry Pratchett

stegan
07-14-2005, 07:51 AM
Making Violence Sexy- Feminist Views on Pornography, Diana Russell, Editor (http://www.dianarussell.com/publications.html#MAKINGVIOLENCESEXY)

A little over the top and a little academic at times, as books of this ilk are wont to be. But very hard to put down, and very compelling.

oldradical
07-14-2005, 07:23 PM
AttackFerret, if you are going to read Thomas Friedman--one of the premier enthusiasts for globalization, the war in Iraq, and the universal ascendancy of the already rich and powerful--I suggest something on the other side of things might be helpful, by way of balance. Any of the books by Arundhati Roy would be useful, or perhaps Naomi Klein's best-known work on globalization, No Logo. Chomsky might be a help, but he has written so much and does go on at length (usually with good reason, it seems to me), that I'm not sure he's the best to start with. The book I'm currently reading by Roy is An Ordinary Person's Guide to Empire.

Feel free to send me private messages, or talk about it here. I think it's great that you're looking into these major issues.

Rebbie
07-14-2005, 08:59 PM
I'm now reading Chuck Palahniuk's new novel, "Haunted." It is f'in graphic. People have been vomiting and fainting at his readings and now I know why. It's causing me physical pain. Don't get me wrong, it is a very good read so far, just...find out for yourself.

Excellent choice. I read that one the other day. I recently became obsessed with Chuck Palahniuk and read all of his books. I would recommend them all. Something tells me that Mr. Palahniuk is not "one of us." I doubt he's even a vegetarian, but I won't hold that against him.
Right now I'm reading Winter's Tale by Mark Helprin. Very good so far.

stegan
07-14-2005, 09:11 PM
Chomsky might be a help, but he has written so much and does go on at length (usually with good reason, it seems to me), that I'm not sure he's the best to start with.

I found with Chomsky that it was a help to start with some of his extended interviews, some of which were published as pamphlet type things, which gives a good intro without some of the heavy detail. Znet also has an archive (http://www.zmag.org/chomsky/index.cfm) that can be a good starting point. I also highly recommend the movie version of Manufacturing Consent (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B00005Y726/qid=1121393395/sr=1-2/ref=sr_1_2/104-5241268-2307960?v=glance&s=dvd) , which is fascinating because it goes into some detail about the man himself.

attackferret
07-14-2005, 11:08 PM
Thanks for the feedback, you guys! I have the Chomsky site bookmarked. I also revisited the Friedman book online and realized that it wasn't what i thought it was.. oops. Now I'm not really planning on reading it. The only two books I was interested in that I could find at Borders half an hour ago were Confessions of an Economic Hitman and The End of Poverty (really, they hide everything. I couldn't find any Jared Diamond or Vandana Shiva books). I picked up The End of Poverty. I'm only several pages in and it's already given me tidbits on sweatshops in Bangladesh and AIDS management in Malawi. I'm super excited about this book. I'll let you know more when I'm done :)

oldradical
07-15-2005, 04:13 AM
When you're ready for some really good belly laughs about the none-too-funny World Trade Organization (WTO), read The Yes Men. I promise you will not believe the things they got away with in successfully posing as various kinds of "authorities" giving lectures at WTO and other "free" trade meetings. Truly hilarious! Their story has been made into a movie, is available on DVD (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B0006N2DSI/ref=pd_sxp_f/102-2925342-3463311?v=glance&s=dvd), and they have their own website (http://www.theyesmen.org/).

For a change, you can laugh heartily on your way to the revolution. As the poster I saw long ago reads: "Remember kids--when you're smashing the state, keep a song in your heart and a smile on your lips." :)

JasonSt
07-15-2005, 08:05 AM
Excellent choice. I read that one the other day. I recently became obsessed with Chuck Palahniuk and read all of his books. I would recommend them all. Something tells me that Mr. Palahniuk is not "one of us." I doubt he's even a vegetarian, but I won't hold that against him.
Right now I'm reading Winter's Tale by Mark Helprin. Very good so far.

'Tis excellent! I really like these lines, about people with disposable convictions, disposable in the presence of money:

"Sitting in the Ritz-Carlton, you might see a few kids you went to reflexology college with, now wearing Armani suits, Chanel cocktail dresses. Kids who used to be vegan bicycle-commuters, now you see them climbing in and out of limousines. ... These hippie dreadlocked earth mothers and goateed skaterpunks, you hear them on the telephone giving sell orders to their stockbrokers."

jenzie
07-15-2005, 01:19 PM
Has anyone read Fugitives and Refugees: A Walk in Portland, Oregon by Chuck Palahniuk?

Also, a friend wants to start reading Palahniuk's novels... which one should he start with, do you think? Anyone have a favorite?

jenzie
07-15-2005, 01:19 PM
'Tis excellent! I really like these lines, about people with disposable convictions, disposable in the presence of money:

"Sitting in the Ritz-Carlton, you might see a few kids you went to reflexology college with, now wearing Armani suits, Chanel cocktail dresses. Kids who used to be vegan bicycle-commuters, now you see them climbing in and out of limousines. ... These hippie dreadlocked earth mothers and goateed skaterpunks, you hear them on the telephone giving sell orders to their stockbrokers."


Is that quote from Winter's Tale?

JasonSt
07-15-2005, 11:46 PM
Has anyone read Fugitives and Refugees: A Walk in Portland, Oregon by Chuck Palahniuk?

Also, a friend wants to start reading Palahniuk's novels... which one should he start with, do you think? Anyone have a favorite?

I read it and used it as a guide when I was in Portland last December.

They're all good. No one can go wrong reading any of his novels as a first Palahniuk!

JasonSt
07-15-2005, 11:49 PM
Is that quote from Winter's Tale?

It's from "Haunted." I Love Trouble (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0110093/)

AdiaStar
07-16-2005, 07:18 AM
I'll be reading "Harry Potter - The Half Blood Prince" today, once UPS deliver it! woo hoo :D

:banana: :cartwheel: :banana:

oldradical
07-16-2005, 09:36 AM
I just finished Arundhati Roy's latest book. It was well worth the read, and I learned quite a bit more about the reality of contemporary India (though the book takes a global view), useful in itself. Here is the source and an extract:

Modern democracies have been around for long enough for neo-liberal capitalists to learn how to subvert them. They have mastered the technique of infiltrating the instruments of democracy—the “independent” judiciary, the “free” press, the parliament—and molding them to their purpose. The project of corporate globalization has cracked the code. Free elections, a free press, and an independent judiciary mean little when the free market has reduced them to commodities available on sale to the highest bidder.

Democracy, the modern world’s holy cow, is in crisis. And the crisis is a profound one. Every kind of outrage is being committed in the name of democracy. It has become little more than a hollow word, a pretty shell, emptied of all content or meaning. It can be whatever you want it to be. Democracy is the Free World’s whore, willing to dress up, dress down, willing to satisfy a whole range of tastes, available to be used and abused at will.

An Ordinary Person’s Guide to Empire, by Arundhati Roy. South End Press, Cambridge MA, 2004.

mrsshf
07-18-2005, 02:29 PM
I have finally come to the conclusion that I will never sit down and finish reading the Dark Tower series by Stephen King, so I'm renting the unabridged audio books to listen to in the car. I wasn't sure that audio would work for this series, but I'm enjoying it vastly thus far.

I am reading the Harry Potter series on paper, and I'm loving that.

CaptainSwab
07-23-2005, 07:48 PM
I just finished the new Harry Potter book. Wow is all I have to say. :D

theveganmary
07-23-2005, 09:17 PM
Spanking the Donkey, by Matt Taibbi

lex_talionis
07-25-2005, 07:56 AM
_Snow Crash_, Neal Stephenson

attackferret
07-25-2005, 09:59 AM
Princess Superstar vs. The Von Bondies - C'mon **** Me (DJ Zebra Mix)

oldradical
07-25-2005, 04:17 PM
This is the reading thread, I trust...

Proceeding on that premise, I am currently reading the following:

A Thousand Sighs, A Thousand Revolts: Journeys in Kurdistan, by Christiane Bird.

Children of NAFTA: Labor Wars on the U.S./Mexico Border, by David Bacon

Free Radical: New Century Essays, by Tony Benn

Historians in Trouble: Plagiarism, Fraud, and Politics in the Ivory Tower, by Jon Wiener

Marie Bonaparte: A Life, by Celia Bertain

The Prospect Before Her: A History of Women in Western Europe, 1500-1800, by Olwen Hufton

attackferret
07-25-2005, 04:19 PM
wow, i was dumb this morning. that was supposed to go in the song of the day thread. sorry everyone!

gladcow
07-25-2005, 05:35 PM
re-reading Shopgirl by Steve Martin in anticipation of the movie (eeek!)

Ilovejodie
07-25-2005, 09:16 PM
The Pig Who Sang To The Moon by Masson,anyone else read this amazing vegan esque book?
http://www.cygnus-books.co.uk/mind_body_spirit_books/pig_who_sang.htm
Ruthie

Kat
07-25-2005, 10:41 PM
I'm reading:

All Creatures Great and Small, which is about a veterinarian

Holidays on Ice, by David Sedaris (Not as funny as Me Talk Pretty One Day, but still pretty funny)

A book of photographs from the National Geographics magazines

The Hipster Handbook

Sorry Everybody, which is a collection of photos from the sorryeverybody.com website

---

I'll be going camping soon, and my reading list for camping includes Chuck Palahniuk, more David Sedaris, and maybe some Terry Pratchett....

----

I also recently finished reading The Last Time I Wore A Dress, which is the true story of the author's time spent in mental hospitals when she was a teenager. She had a lot of issues that needed to be dealt with (such as sexual abuse, gang involvement, family problems, etc), but the major thing the hospitals focussed on was how feminine or not that she was. They diagnosed her as having a gender identity disorder, and coerced her to do things like wear makeup and dresses. She had to comply with all these silly rules and act very feminine in order to have priveledges like television or being allowed to go outside. The doctors were also really uptight over whether she was having "appropriate" relationships with people according to their gender; like trying to restrict her from socializing too much with girls or too much with guys, etc...This all happened in the 1980's...I was shocked at how recently it was...

Then again, since some countries still sentence people to death for being gay, I guess it's not too far fetched that there are places in north america that try to coerce queer people into sexual orientations and gender expressions/identities that aren't their's....*sigh*

stegan
08-02-2005, 09:17 AM
I just received in the mail my special edition copy of Nick Hornby's "Songbook" (http://store.mcsweeneys.net/index.cfm/fuseaction/catalog.detail/object_id/C0AB5F20-8C87-4ECB-8462-A51B5B560A93/Songbook.cfm) , with bonus CD. eeeeee! :) Resisting the urge to take the rest of the day off and read the book in one sitting with the CD on repeat :)

[/music dorkiness]

stegan
08-17-2005, 07:44 AM
Just finished reading The Tao of Pooh- I read it years ago, but was in a very different place in life. Very enjoyable.

jenzie
08-17-2005, 10:42 AM
Just finished reading The Tao of Pooh- I read it years ago, but was in a very different place in life. Very enjoyable.

One of my favorite books. :)

ConsciousCuisine
08-17-2005, 11:30 AM
One of my favorite books. :)


:D


"Everything Happens for a Reason" is one of 7 books I am currently reading.

jenzie
08-17-2005, 02:48 PM
"Everything Happens for a Reason" is one of 7 books I am currently reading.

By Suzane Northrop, or Mira Kirshenbaum?

ConsciousCuisine
08-17-2005, 02:56 PM
Mira Kirshenbaum :) You like it? Did you feel like you could have written it? I feel as though I've had lessons in all 10 areas! :confused: :o :)

jenzie
08-17-2005, 03:10 PM
Mira Kirshenbaum :) You like it? Did you feel like you could have written it? I feel as though I've had lessons in all 10 areas! :confused: :o :)

I actually haven't read it yet, but I just ordered it on Amazon, so I'll report back when I do. :)

Lyrical-lynx
08-17-2005, 04:02 PM
Ah reading one of my fave hobbies... i have just finished reading "The Other Bolyn Girl" By Philippa Gregory, really enjoyed it, just wondered if anybody else has read any of her books, and can point me in the way of other good ones, there seem to be alot!!!

Also reading, "Changing Planes" by U.K.Le Guin, abit strange, but an intresting notion!

:-)

veganfreak
08-17-2005, 06:19 PM
I'm reading "Speciesism" by Joan Dunayer. It is pretty solid so far.

veganfreak
08-17-2005, 06:20 PM
Also reading, "Changing Planes" by U.K.Le Guin, abit strange, but an intresting notion!

Le Guin's "The Dispossessed" is one of my absolute favorite books because of the ways that it illustrates anarchist theory. She's a brilliant writer.

bluedawg
08-17-2005, 07:51 PM
Hey, I have The Pig Who Sang to the Moon (and When Elephants Weep) and Dominion. I would be very interested in hearing your thoughts on these books. I haven't had a chance to read them yet, but they're close to the top of my very large pile of must-reads.seitanicvegan, i'm sorry it took me 8 years to reply to this, but the truth is, it took me forever to get started on the pig who sang to the moon, and then i read the first chapter and got sidetracked with the half-blood prince, and i'm only now getting back into it.

i am now halfway through (i've read the introductory chapter about the titular piggie, and then the chapters on pigs, chickens, and goats/sheep) so i feel like i can comment somewhat. :) i like the book, but i wish it were a bit more "hard-hitting." i think i was expecting more in-depth analysis and more nuanced arguments, and in my opinion it's a bit more casual than that. it's still enjoyable, though, and i will keep reading! i have heard from a couple of people that when elephants weep is the better of the two books. i don't have that one, but now i'm very interested. :)

dominion, as i've said before (in random spots), is a bit heavy. i like it, but i have it next to the bed for "before sleepytime reading," and sometimes i'm just not up for it that late at night! maybe i should move it to my coffee table and try to read it during odd midday opportunities. heh. it's a REALLY strong book, extremely thorough and well-written and chock full of convincing arguments; it's just taking me a while to get through it. i think i'm still in chapter 4 (whales), which means i'm maybe 1/3 of the way through.

Lyrical-lynx
08-18-2005, 09:05 AM
Le Guin's "The Dispossessed" is one of my absolute favorite books because of the ways that it illustrates anarchist theory. She's a brilliant writer.

She is amazzing, her books from the earthsea, were the first books i ever got into, and at one time i carryed a very batered copy everywhere, like a comfort teddy i had a comfort book! (yes i know a little strange but hey i am weirder now i'm vegan! lest thats what my friends tell me....)

I've not yet read "The Dispossessed" its not in the libary, but will do if i find a copy, I also love her book, "The left hand of darkness" Thou the earthsea books have still got to be my faves, I love the idea of everything have a true name, and the way "every act you take, everything you do, binds you to its self and its concequencs again and yet again" (or words to that affect i cant quite rember the qoute)

:-)

iamtheqbu
08-18-2005, 09:56 AM
i have heard from a couple of people that when elephants weep is the better of the two books. i don't have that one, but now i'm very interested. :)

I like that one better too. Have you read his other books, The Emotional Lives of Cats and The Emotional Lives of Dogs ? A good vegan recruiting method is to give a cat/dog loving omni the cat/dog book (They are both insightful, funny and easy to relate to!) and then give them The Pig Who Sang to the Moon so they'll be more likely to read it since they enjoyed the author's other book and they'll understand the connection between Fluffy and Porky better. ;)

Dominion is a heavy read, but I love quoting it in arguments/discussions with omnis/hunters/@$$ hats. I re-read the book frequently.

Another good book for AR is Introduction to Animal Rights: Your Child or Your Dog? I can't remember the author off the top of my head but he/she makes very good arguments and makes it very easy to understand. It has got to be difficult for even the most anti-AR person to not say 'oh, OK, that kinda makes sense after all' provided you can get them to read the book! :p

iamtheqbu
08-18-2005, 10:03 AM
I've not yet read "The Dispossessed" its not in the libary, but will do if i find a copy, I also love her book, "The left hand of darkness" Thou the earthsea books have still got to be my faves, I love the idea of everything have a true name, and the way "every act you take, everything you do, binds you to its self and its concequencs again and yet again" (or words to that affect i cant quite rember the qoute)

:-)

Awseome, I loved The Dispossessed . I had to read it for a class in college. We also read Ender's Game . It's the same genra but with more of a moral/ethical twist. It's about a war that turns out to be a huge misunderstanding and the person responsible for nearly wiping out the 'enemy' becomes their advocate. The sequels are also good. I just got Tales from EarthSea from a rummage sale but I haven't read EarthSea . I kinda wanna read it first before I read the tales.

I love Books! I must have bought a hundred from rummage sales, book sales and used book stores this summer. Just a few days ago I picked up three books being given away for free outside the college book store. Yay for free books! :happy:

bluedawg
08-18-2005, 11:58 AM
I like that one better too. Have you read his other books, The Emotional Lives of Cats and The Emotional Lives of Dogs ? A good vegan recruiting method is to give a cat/dog loving omni the cat/dog book (They are both insightful, funny and easy to relate to!) and then give them The Pig Who Sang to the Moon so they'll be more likely to read it since they enjoyed the author's other book and they'll understand the connection between Fluffy and Porky better. ;)thanks for the tip! i just did a search on his name at amazon.com and learned that he has a new book coming out next month. here's a link: raising the peaceable kingdom: what animals can teach us about the social origins of tolerance and friendship (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0345466136/qid=1124384130/sr=1-20/ref=sr_1_20/102-7251304-6856127?v=glance&s=books). sounds interesting.

iamtheqbu
08-18-2005, 01:24 PM
Sounds neat. I think I'll take that editorial with a grain of salt. It makes the book sound shallow and uninteresting, which is highly uncharacteristic of Mason's books. I'm sure that there is much more to it than the review indicates.

iamtheqbu
08-18-2005, 01:29 PM
Another good book for AR is Introduction to Animal Rights: Your Child or Your Dog? I can't remember the author off the top of my head but he/she makes very good arguments and makes it very easy to understand. It has got to be difficult for even the most anti-AR person to not say 'oh, OK, that kinda makes sense after all' provided you can get them to read the book! :p

Found it!

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1566396921/qid=1124389667/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/102-7049986-4519364?v=glance&s=books

iamtheqbu
08-18-2005, 05:54 PM
Have you read his other books, The Emotional Lives of Cats and The Emotional Lives of Dogs ?

Got the titles wrong. Should be The Nine Emotional Lives of Cats and Dogs Never Lie About Love

Lyrical-lynx
08-19-2005, 05:39 AM
[QUOTE=iamtheqbu] I just got Tales from EarthSea from a rummage sale but I haven't read EarthSea . I kinda wanna read it first before I read the tales. [QUOTE]

The earthsea books should be read in this order,

"A Wizard of EarthSea"
"Tombs of Atuan"
"The Farthest Shore"
"Tehanu"
"The Other Wind"

I am not sure if you can get them all in one volume, but you can get "the earth sea quartet" covering the first 4, the last one, "the other wind" Was only written a few years a go, and to be honest isn't quite up to standard compaired to the others, well at least i didn't feel that it was!

I am actully trying to find myself a copy of Tales from Earthsea, as i haven't yet been able to read it, so might, ahh shock horror buy a copy! (sencond hand!)

:-)

oldradical
08-24-2005, 02:19 PM
Just got two I'm looking forward to:

I'm Not The Only One, by George Galloway. Penguin, London, 2005 (had to request this one via interlibrary loan, it's so recent)

George Galloway is the only MP elected on the Respect Party ticket to the House of Commons; he is also a well-known and fiery critic of the Iraq war.

Freethinkers: A History of American Secularism, by Susan Jacoby. Henry Holt & Co., New York, 2004.

stegan
08-24-2005, 02:27 PM
George Galloway's Testimony (http://www.commondreams.org/views05/0517-35.htm) before the Senate "Oil For Food" witch hunt committee absolutely floored me. The man is a master. Thanks for the tip, oldradical, I'll have to go check that out.

oldradical
08-28-2005, 12:59 PM
I just finished George Galloway's book, I'm Not The Only One. Well worth reading, both because of the substantive information he presents and his excellent way of writing. The man is a master of the passing and one-line zinger.

"My flag is red and my country is the future."

"The only way you know he's [Tony Blair] lying is his lips are moving."

"Iraqis make good friends and terrible enemies."

It's well to remember that, unlike all the scum who put together the current war against the Iraqis, Galloway is married to a woman from the area, has been to the Middle East many times, and is highly regarded by the common people there. He has a well-deserved reputation for standing up for the underdog--something he's done since a teenager, when he first became politically active.

I don't know whether the book has been published in this country yet; maybe there will be some available when he goes on his planned antiwar tour in this country with Jane Fonda and others.

4theanimals
09-07-2005, 08:46 PM
I just got Tales from EarthSea from a rummage sale but I haven't read EarthSea . I kinda wanna read it first before I read the tales.

I love Books! I must have bought a hundred from rummage sales, book sales and used book stores this summer. Just a few days ago I picked up three books being given away for free outside the college book store. Yay for free books! :happy:

I started reading the Earthsea series this weeked and right now I'm on the third one. I love books too!!! We sound so similar! I have like six bookshelves in my house and my mother says that if I bring one more book into the house, we'll all fall through the floor. I second your "Yay!"

4theanimals
09-07-2005, 08:54 PM
I'm sure Upton Sinclair's The Jungle is mentioned somewhere in this thread, but I can't find it. I read it because it is a classic. What did y'all think. Also, has anyone read Micheal W. Fox's Returning to Eden or any of his others? It's a bit oudated, but I still thought it was worth reading.

Lyrical-lynx
09-08-2005, 09:55 AM
Yayy for the libary!

For about a year now i have been looking for Tales of the Earthsea, not found any were, even been biding on e-bay, thou never winning grrrr then yesterday i found it, in the kids part of the libary new in, Tales of the Earthsea!

I love it, its great and thou this may sounds odd, it is lovely to be back there, i spend so meny years in "earthsea" that readding more about it the same places the same historys, its great! I think i am still gona have to buy myself a copy thou, its too good to give back to the libary without a replacement!!!

:-)

stegan
09-08-2005, 10:03 AM
Currently re-reading: "Da Capo's Best Music Writing 2001"

This anthology is still going, and it's always interesting read a wide breadth of writings on music, I think, not just what's in Rolling Stone or Spin or what have you. The entries vary from actual reviews of artists to stories about the history of "The Lion Sleeps Tonight" to Robbie Fulks trying to explain to an IRS auditor that the musicians he plays with are not his "employees"...

Then again, I'm a complete and total music dork, so I would like a book like this. :)

4theanimals
09-08-2005, 04:34 PM
Then again, I'm a complete and total music dork, so I would like a book like this. :)

Me too!!! I'm all about the music, especially any rock. Classic rock is my love, although I'll never beat my brother for obscure music facts. My rock book is my bible to life. music! yay! books! yay!

rupafree
09-09-2005, 08:54 AM
The Pig Who Sang to the Moon [/I] so they'll be more likely to read it since they enjoyed the author's other book and they'll understand the connection between Fluffy and Porky better. ;) Jeffrey Masson also wrote "Against Therapy" - thought-provoking

Introduction to Animal Rights: Your Child or Your Dog?[/I] I can't remember the author off the top of my head - Gary L. Francione (checked it out on Amazon and looks a good read, cheers!)

grog
09-09-2005, 11:39 AM
Yayy for the libary!

For about a year now i have been looking for Tales of the Earthsea, not found any were, even been biding on e-bay, thou never winning grrrr then yesterday i found it, in the kids part of the libary new in, Tales of the Earthsea!


What is that? A collection of stories by other authors about Earthsea? Or did Ursula write it?

Lyrical-lynx
09-10-2005, 03:35 PM
It a colection of storys/historys that Ursula wrote, when she was asked to make a new earthsea book (the other wind) While trying to write this book she chame up with these historys as a way of making things easier for her resuech, it also has an explanation of the earthsea, but i not read that bit yet so cant tell you whats its about!

Becuase she made the historys before she wrote The Other Wind, you wont spoil the story if you read Tale of the Earthsea after the 4th book, but she has put a note at the start saying dont read it unless you have read the first earthsea books, as it gives quite a few things away!

:-)

dropscone
09-10-2005, 03:52 PM
Cory Doctorow's Someone Comes to Town Someone Leaves Town (http://craphound.com/someone/Cory_Doctorow_-_Someone_Comes_to_Town_Someone_Leaves_Town.htm) - it's a really peculiar story, slightly Neal Stephenson but maybe a bit more accessable, certainly more physically accessable in that it's published under a Creative Commons license, so it's freely readable online, distributable, and anyone in the developing world can do whatever they like with it.

I've linked directly to the text, but if you go to the index page there's a nice blurb about the license and copyright type issues in general. The actual story has elements of freedom of information/communication also, as well as some very bizarre storylines.

grog
09-10-2005, 04:25 PM
Becuase she made the historys before she wrote The Other Wind, you wont spoil the story if you read Tale of the Earthsea after the 4th book,

I thought Tehanu was the 4th and last book of Earthsea. I need to go look up this Other Wind now. :cool:

Though I found Tehanu depressing.

ETA: Ah I see. Tales of Earthsea is considered the 5th, and the Other Wind, the 6th. I stand rightly confused though since Tehanu is subtitled "The Last Book of Earthsea" :umm:

Lyrical-lynx
09-11-2005, 04:29 PM
Yeah it is confusing, She actully apolagices at the start of Tales of the Earthsea, and saying that at the time she thought it was the last book, but that even authers can be wrong some times!!

You found it depressing? I really liked it! It was abit different in some ways to the others, but i liked the way it cleared everything up! The book i lest liked of them all was The Tombs of Antun, it seemed to take a very long time to start!

The Other Wind... i have got to say first time i read it i was dissapointed, didn't seem to have....something, i am not sure what! But now readding it for the secound time, i am really enjoying it! Think its a grower!

:-)

mamaquilla
09-13-2005, 02:12 PM
Just finished The Ice Queen by Alice Hoffman

Loved it, reallllllly good, heavy topics :happy:

bluedawg
10-06-2005, 05:49 PM
i'm reading dominion by matthew scully right now. i hate to say this, because it makes me feel very, very stupid, but i'm struggling with it a bit. the first chapter was really boring or "too much" or something... i was having a tough time staying engaged. i really really liked the writing in the second chapter (on the safari club), but now i'm in chapter 3 and i'm kind of zoning in and out again. i wanted to love this book and instead i'm finding myself worried that i'm too stoopid to read it. i seriously can't believe i just admitted that. :umm:wow. i just went back to look for my original post and i can't believe i posted that in february. it took me a LONG time to get through--i finished dominion last night. i read a good handful of books in the meantime, because i just didn't always feel "up for it." i think it was a good book, and matthew scully is a very strong writer, but i don't know if i'm just generally "bleah" about scholarly-ish reading or what.

my favorite parts of the book were the in-depth explanations of hunting (e.g., the safari club), whaling, and hog farms. there were A LOT of pages that were not about these things. :) i feel like sometimes i was reading the words just to read them so i could make it through, but i wasn't really processing everything. anyway, there were a couple of things toward the end of the book that were very thought-provoking, and i might blog about them soon.

again, i'm afraid this makes me sound stupid, but i'm just being honest. :)

iamtheqbu
10-06-2005, 07:07 PM
I just started reading my biochem textbook, it actually isn't bad, though I do enjoy a good text book. The only type of text book I can't read is math, even though I do love doing problems, I just can't get into the book. Man, I haven't read my multivariate calculus book in years!

I've been trying to get some of my educated non-religious anti-evolution friends to give my evolution text book a serious consideration, but I don't think they will, even though I agreed to read any informtaion they provided. Sillies.

This semester I have Animal Phys instead of Evolution, that's an awesome text book too. Over the summer at a rummage sale I found another anatomy book, including a short book about the anatomy and physiology of blood cells. Neato.

I'm also going to start my Communication Arts: TV Production text book, we have a test Monday. I haven't read it yet because I was focusing on my project. It was an audio PSA for Buy Nothing Day, it was rockin'.

Geeze this is a little off topic, maybe I should have put this is a different thread?

jenzie
10-06-2005, 09:59 PM
Gosh, I've been a slacker about posting here. I think I've read about 20 books since the last time I was in this thread... :p

Anyway, right now I'm reading: The Long Valley by John Steinbeck, Babbitt by Sinclair Lewis, Mr. Maybe by Jane Green, and On Subbing by Dave.

bluedawg
10-17-2005, 07:02 PM
this afternoon i finished reading mad cowboy by howard lyman. it was a quick and easy read, mostly because it is written in an extremely straightforward manner. i found it interesting that the main focus was on health stuff (and then environment stuff), with almost no focus on the cruelty aspect. i mean, he mentions some issues that relate to cruelty, but doesn't really dwell on them.

anyway, i thought it was a great book, and it strikes me as the type of book that omnis might be willing to read without too much prodding.

gladcow
10-17-2005, 07:20 PM
Currently reading: Plan B, Further Thoughts on Faith by Anne Lamott

it's real good

Kat
10-17-2005, 07:32 PM
I just finished The Pearl and Of Mice And Men by Steinbeck. They're depressing. Does he kill off characters in ALL of his novels??

Kat
10-17-2005, 07:33 PM
Oh yeah, other books read recently:

The Long Dark Tea Time of the Soul by Douglas Adams

The Colour Purple by Alice Walker

and I'm in the midst of Bush Must Go. I forget who wrote it, though.

trichaos
10-17-2005, 11:37 PM
"The Beginner's Guide to Zen Buddhism".

Helping me live in the moment amidst all the chaos in my life.

grog
10-17-2005, 11:55 PM
I bought that book once. I opened it up, and it was just a blank page. :blank: :silly:

attackferret
10-18-2005, 01:55 PM
I just read the Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, and I loved it.

I'm starting 'Understanding Power: The Indispensible Chomsky'. So far it's very interesting. I don't have much time to read it though.. I spend much more of my time reading such pageturners as 'BIOCHEMISTRY', 'Meteorology for Scientists and Engineers' and 'Cassaret and Doull's Toxicology'. Woo!

Baby Buell Rider
10-18-2005, 02:00 PM
I've just finished the Dan Brown books.
But I'm currently reading a history book of the life of James Vl.

Tracy G
10-18-2005, 03:14 PM
Colloquial Icelandic: The Complete Course for Beginners by Daisy L. Neijmann.

iamtheqbu
10-18-2005, 04:26 PM
I bought that book once. I opened it up, and it was just a blank page. :blank: :silly:

:laugh: :rolleyes: ;)

iamtheqbu
10-18-2005, 04:30 PM
I'm reading 'Meat Market' by Eric Marcus now. My sister won the book from Vegan Porn's 'name the cow' contest. She named him pornicus. Yay!

I like the book so far, but all I've read is the essays by various vegan activists. Seems cool and not hard to read, but I have yet to make the time, what with my comp project and applying to grad school topping my agenda.

jenzie
10-18-2005, 05:28 PM
Currently reading Winesburg, Ohio by Sherwood Anderson.

Oh, and I just picked up the latest book in A Series of Unfortunate Events - The Penultimate Peril, Book the Twelfth. :happy:

gladcow
10-18-2005, 07:09 PM
Oh, and I just picked up the latest book in A Series of Unfortunate Events - The Penultimate Peril, Book the Twelfth. :happy:
:o
DO NOT tell my son.

Maybe for Chrismas....
:thinking:

jenzie
10-18-2005, 07:22 PM
:o
DO NOT tell my son.

Maybe for Chrismas....
:thinking:

*lips are sealed*

:!:

Wait, on second thought... I may need to be bribed with cupcakes and brownies. Yeah, that's it, cupcakes and brownies! ;) :silly:

bird
10-18-2005, 07:24 PM
:laugh: jenzie's a smart cookie. ;)

gladcow
10-18-2005, 07:28 PM
*lips are sealed*

:!:

Wait, on second thought... I may need to be bribed with cupcakes and brownies. Yeah, that's it, cupcakes and brownies! ;) :silly:

I don't negotiate :blank:

You tell him, you buy it for him :laugh:

and you are welcome to come to my house anytime for some chow :cool:

jenzie
10-18-2005, 07:36 PM
I don't negotiate :blank:

You tell him, you buy it for him :laugh:

Drat! Foiled again! (Next time, Gadget, next time! :silly: )

trichaos
10-18-2005, 07:52 PM
I'm reading 'Meat Market' by Eric Marcus now. My sister won the book from Vegan Porn's 'name the cow' contest. She named him pornicus. Yay!

I like the book so far, but all I've read is the essays by various vegan activists. Seems cool and not hard to read, but I have yet to make the time, what with my comp project and applying to grad school topping my agenda.
Pornicus! :laugh: :happy: That's hilarious. Oh, and good luck with the grad school application process.

oldradical
10-18-2005, 08:18 PM
I'm not quite halfway through The Chess Artist: Genius, Obsession, and the World's Oldest Game, by J. C. Hallman. It's written as a fictional story with lots of real information about the history of chess and, to my memory, a pretty accurate characterization of what chess whizzes and their subculture are like.

MissLovely
10-18-2005, 09:24 PM
I just finished The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls. It's a very touching memoir.

Tracy G
10-25-2005, 04:19 PM
I got a treasure in the mail today! Borgason's out-of-print, 800+ page, hardcover Ensk-Íslensk Orðabók (English-Icelandic dictionary)—the 1994 revision of the 1952 classic. I'd been looking on and off since May, and now own a gently used copy for $15.

I'm not reading it cover-to-cover, of course, but I've been looking up random words all day like the obsessively studious individual that I am. I've learned that "massage therapist" translates to nuddlæknir. In Icelandic, nudda means "rub," and læknir means "doctor." Somehow, this really tickles me. I keep wanting to run around shouting "I'm a rub doctor! I'm a rub doctor!"

Yes, I am a complete dork.

grog
10-25-2005, 04:20 PM
Its probably better to be a Rub Doctor, than to be Dr. Rub.

bird
10-25-2005, 10:27 PM
Shopping score! Shopping score! Woot, Tracy G! :D

bird
10-30-2005, 11:16 PM
Has anyone read this yet?

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1400031656/qid=1130735646/sr=2-2/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_2/104-3832667-4411143?v=glance&s=books

oldradical
10-31-2005, 12:12 AM
I'm reading several books right now, three of which are:

The Philosopher's Dog: Friendships with Animals, by Raimond Gaita; The Heart of Whiteness: Confronting, Race, Racism, and White Privilege, by Robert Jensen; and The Ptolemies, by Duncan Spratt.

I like reading several books at once, since I can do a bit of one then a bit of another, for variety. Once in a great while a single book will interest me enough to read it straight through--but not very often. Besides, it's nice to be spoiled by public libraries--probably the best example we have of working socialism.

stegan
11-10-2005, 07:51 AM
I've been reading "Cat's Cradle" by Kurt Vonnegut. I so love his style of writing, and this is a quick and fun read. I'm already up to chapter 100 :)

Kat
11-10-2005, 07:54 AM
Steveo, that's one of my favourite novels. I'm half tempted to go Bokononist myself ;)

Currently I'm reading a book called American Gods, by Neil Gaiman. It's pretty good so far.

mishka
11-10-2005, 08:17 AM
I just received Son of a Witch last night - the follow up to Wicked, which I loved. The stage production of Wicked, however, was pretty disappointing in my opinion.

schmeel
11-10-2005, 08:24 AM
I just read two novels by Walter Kirn, Thumbsucker (which has just been turned into a movie), and Mission To America. They were definitely the types of books that I didn't enjoy while I was reading them, but then stepping back from them I said "Man, those were good!" His discriptions are so real and heavy.

I just started Diary by Chuck Palhaniuk (author of Fight Club et al.)

Penultimate
11-10-2005, 09:59 AM
I got a treasure in the mail today! Borgason's out-of-print, 800+ page, hardcover Ensk-Íslensk Orðabók (English-Icelandic dictionary)—the 1994 revision of the 1952 classic. I'd been looking on and off since May, and now own a gently used copy for $15.

Are you mad, woman? You're learning to speak Icelandic? Did you lose a bet? :) I was married to an Icelander for four years and still can only say 5 or 6 things in that language. And one of the phrases is, "I don't speak Icelandic." :happy: Seriously, though. Good luck to you.

I'm reading "Accordion Crimes" by Annie Proulx. She has such a wonderful way with language and phrasing. What would otherwise be bleak, hopeless tales are beautiful in her hands.

oldradical
11-10-2005, 10:37 AM
I'm very pleased to have obtained via my library a book released in this country just five days ago. The author has been a journalist covering various wars for the past 30 years, most of them in the Middle East. The book is almost 1100 pages long, so I'll have to concentrate on it amongst the others I'm currently reading. Here's the name of the book and a useful, early extract from it:

The Great War for Civilisation: The Conquest of the Middle East, by Robert Fisk. Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 2005

Soldier and civilian, they died in their tens of thousands because death had been concocted for them, morality hitched like a halter round the warhorse so that we could talk about “target-rich environments” and “collateral damage”—that most infantile of attempts to shake off the crime of killing—and report the victory parades, the tearing down of statues and the importance of peace.
Governments like it that way. They want their people to see war as a drama of opposites, god and evil, “them” and “us,” victory or defeat. But war is primarily not about victory or defeat but about death and the infliction of death. It represents the total failure of the human spirit.

kristy
11-10-2005, 11:08 AM
I just finished reading Marion Zimmer Bradley's "The Mists of Avalon". I thoroughly enjoyed it.
Hey, I'm a bit intimidated by the reading material of some people on here! I personally only read fiction...preferably historic romances :p

Tracy G
11-10-2005, 11:30 AM
Are you mad, woman? You're learning to speak Icelandic? ...Good luck to you.

I'm reading "Accordion Crimes" by Annie Proulx. She has such a wonderful way with language and phrasing. What would otherwise be bleak, hopeless tales are beautiful in her hands.If by "mad" you mean obsessive and utterly impractical, then yes, yes I am! :D

I'm loving Icelandic and have a vocabulary of nearly 200 words now. The EuroTalk software has been more helpful than the Routledge audio course. I don't yet have a grasp of the grammar but will keep working on it.

I really like Proulx's writing style, too, though I haven't read Accordion Crimes yet. The Shipping News, That Old Ace in a Hole, and Close Range, Wyoming Stories are all excellent.

attackferret
11-10-2005, 11:42 AM
I just finished reading Marion Zimmer Bradley's "The Mists of Avalon". I thoroughly enjoyed it.
Hey, I'm a bit intimidated by the reading material of some people on here! I personally only read fiction...preferably historic romances :pI love Mists of Avalon! Have you read the prequel, Forest House? I'm a big fan of that, too. I was only so-so on the transition novel.. Priestess of Avalon, I believe.

I'm also a big fan of romance (mainly historical) :kiss:

I recently read Crime and Punishment, and now I'm reading The Idiot, both by Dostoevsky. I'm in love.

I'm also still working on The Indispensible Chomsky, in bits and pieces.

mishka
11-10-2005, 01:20 PM
I recently read Crime and Punishment, and now I'm reading The Idiot, both by Dostoevsky. I'm in love.

oooo.. The Idiot is in my (really big) 'to read' pile :)

dropscone
11-10-2005, 03:07 PM
Urgh, I found The Idiot really depressing. I guess that may be the point.

I've just finished Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman, which I found rather entertaining, and very humane and comforting.

Now I need to wade into the piles and piles of 'to be read' books loitering in my room.

kikkert
11-10-2005, 03:25 PM
I used to feed a wide variety of birds, as well as squirrels, ducks, rabbits, and others when I lived in quiet houses that had patios and porches and small yards. Now that I live in an apartment building, my only bird entertainment is a tree outside my kitchen window. So I recently bought a 2 level (6 station) feeder, seed for songsters, jays, woodpeckers, doves, and sparrows, and extra stuff to keep them interested. So far, it's working! So my current reading material is:

Birds of Pennsylvania: field guide by Stan Tekiela

The birds of Pennsylvania by Gerald M. McWilliams and Daniel W. Browning; with a foreword by Kenny Kaufman

:happy:

Penultimate
11-12-2005, 11:08 AM
I really like Proulx's writing style, too, though I haven't read Accordion Crimes yet. The Shipping News, That Old Ace in a Hole, and Close Range, Wyoming Stories are all excellent.

I can't wait to see the movie version of her story "Brokeback Mountain", which is coming out soon. Not least of all because Jake Gyllenhaal is so damned cute! Oops, I guess this should be in the movie thread.

So to redeem myself I'll mentioned a book that I recently read: "The Pleasure Of My Company" by Steve Martin. I was surprised at how much I enjoyed this sweet, funny story. Highly recommend it.

oldradical
11-22-2005, 12:42 AM
If anyone gets hold of this book and reads it, please give a review here or at least a comment or two; I'm hoping it will be quickly picked up by a major publisher, so it can be widely distributed:

War Protester's Book

By BEN SISARIO
Published: November 22, 2005

Cindy Sheehan, the California woman who drew wide news media attention for her 26-day protest camp last summer near President Bush's ranch in Crawford, Tex., has written a book that will be published tomorrow. "Not One More Mother's Child," issued by a new publisher, Koa Books of Hawaii, contains journal entries, speeches, letters and new writings, The Associated Press reported. Koa has printed 20,000 copies so far and paid Ms. Sheehan a "modest" advance; she said she had accepted the company's offer because she didn't care about the money and wanted the book printed quickly. Ms. Sheehan's son, Specialist Casey A. Sheehan of the Army, was killed in Iraq in April 2004.

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/11/22/books/22shee.html

gladcow
11-22-2005, 02:01 AM
"Catch Your Dog Doing Something Right"

lotus_blue
11-22-2005, 06:10 AM
"A People's History of the United States"

stegan
11-22-2005, 01:08 PM
"Hey, Nostradamus!" by Douglas Coupland (whose website (http://www.coupland.com) is wicked cool to boot).

One of my favorite authors- he can take you so deep inside the minds of his characters, and really wrap you int the blanket of the story. This one is loosely based on the events around the Columbine shootings, but goes a lot deeper than that into the human take on religion and fellow man.

The only downside is I hate finishing his books because I want them to keep going.

bluedawg
11-22-2005, 01:41 PM
i'm reading speciesism by joan dunayer. it's organized in thirds: old-speciesism, new-speciesism, and nonspeciesism. (man, that word starts looking crazy if you type it too much!) i'm done with the first third, and i am enjoying it so far. it sparked some interesting (if somewhat inane) hallway conversation when two of my colleagues saw and read the cover, too.

bird
11-22-2005, 02:02 PM
i'm reading speciesism by joan dunayer. it's organized in thirds: old-speciesism, new-speciesism, and nonspeciesism. (man, that word starts looking crazy if you type it too much!)Oh gosh, you're right. It does! :laugh:

Tracy G
12-05-2005, 09:39 AM
The Snowflake: Winter's Secret Beauty, text by Kenneth Libbrecht, photography by Patricia Rasmussen, ©2003.

My sister-in-law gave this book to my husband two Christmases ago, and I just now read it. Written by a physicist for a popular audience, it's a quick yet informative read, graced by breathtaking full-color images of snow crystals on nearly every page.

Penultimate
12-05-2005, 10:01 AM
I just received Son of a Witch last night - the follow up to Wicked, which I loved.

I'm about halfway through "Wicked" right now and it's not really sparking my interest. The AR issues are just starting to surface, which is spicing it up a little, but it's not what I expected. I've been told to stick with it because it gets better. True?

I think the book was discussed elsewhere in this thread also but I couldn't bring myself to wade through the forty-odd pages that have accumulated to find it :)

mishka
12-05-2005, 10:05 AM
I'm about halfway through "Wicked" right now and it's not really sparking my interest.
I have heard others say this too - I really got into Wicked though. I enjoyed the second half more than the first and really zipped through it, which is very unlike me. I'm a pretty slow reader.

gladcow
12-05-2005, 11:36 AM
Just finished
"The Soup Peddler's Slow and Difficult Soups"
which I really liked. It's not a vegetarian or vegan recipe book, but there were a lot of vegan recipes in it. And it was such a fun read.

going to start.... something...

vegangurl
12-05-2005, 12:10 PM
Flyy Girl by Eric Jerome Dicky(this is my 3rd time reading this book)

bird
12-05-2005, 05:00 PM
The Snowflake: Winter's Secret Beauty, text by Kenneth Libbrecht, photography by Patricia Rasmussen, ©2003.

My sister-in-law gave this book to my husband two Christmases ago, and I just now read it. Written by a physicist for a popular audience, it's a quick yet informative read, graced by breathtaking full-color images of snow crystals on nearly every page.Hey, what a coincidence! I just discovered this book two nights ago, and put it on my "to buy" list. :happy:

stegan
12-05-2005, 05:11 PM
"Hey, Nostradamus!" by Douglas Coupland

I'll be honest, I was disappointed with this one. It was good overall, but the disjointed narrative of having four different narrators tell their stories seperately instead of intertwined ended up being distracting and made the story anticlimatic. Meh.

lamb
12-05-2005, 05:30 PM
I read The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand- my favorite book, i think. Has anyone else read it? I thought the entire section on Ellsworth Tooie (sp?) was completely unneccesary, but other than that its AWESOME. I definately recommend!

Tracy G
12-05-2005, 07:24 PM
Hey, what a coincidence! I just discovered this book two nights ago, and put it on my "to buy" list. :happy:

Cool synchronicity! Snowflake is a nifty book, and I do recommend it. I might even read it again.

GliondrachM
12-05-2005, 07:25 PM
Bandit Country, about the IRA scum of South Armagh.

FarmerStephen
12-08-2005, 12:27 AM
I just started "Son of a Witch" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0060548932/ref=sib_dp_pt/002-3026675-8672010#reader-link) , by Gregory Maguire. The much awaited sequel to "Wicked". So far, soooooo good. I was a little worried about ole Greg after everything he wrote after "Wicked" paled in comparrison. Maybe it's my affinity for Animals and animals, or my ability to relate to an anti-government AR activist like Elphaba, whatever the case, I am so glad to be back in Oz.......

mishka
12-08-2005, 08:25 AM
I just started "Son of a Witch" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0060548932/ref=sib_dp_pt/002-3026675-8672010#reader-link) , by Gregory Maguire. The much awaited sequel to "Wicked". So far, soooooo good.
ooo... thanks for the update, FarmerStephen! my bf bought me the book recently and I plan on reading it over the xmas holidays during our trip to Italy. I haven't read any of his other books since I was told Wicked was, by far, the best one.

jenzie
12-11-2005, 04:57 PM
So I read A Series of Unfortunate Events - The Penultimate Peril, Book the Twelfth, and it was awesome, of course! :happy:

Also recently read: Go Down, Moses by Faulkner, Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston, Uncle Tom's Children by Richard Wright, Thirteen Stories by Welty, and For Whom the Bell Tolls by Hemingway.

No wonder when I'm reading on the bus people are always asking, "English major?" ;)

KKB
12-11-2005, 05:22 PM
The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali again.
and lots and lots of journal articles and papers on the politics of race, and neuropsychology... and a big fat stats textbook

KKB
12-11-2005, 05:24 PM
I read The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand- my favorite book, i think. Has anyone else read it? I thought the entire section on Ellsworth Tooie (sp?) was completely unneccesary, but other than that its AWESOME. I definately recommend!
good book. have you read Atlas Shrugged ?

grog
12-11-2005, 05:36 PM
good book. have you read Atlas Shrugged ?

in my version atlas (http://brokenverse.blogspot.com/2005/05/release-281993.html) actually explodes :)

lamb
12-11-2005, 07:05 PM
good book. have you read Atlas Shrugged ?

no, but it's next on my list! I read Anthem and The fountainhead, and Atlas shrugged is my next undertaking. Perhaps during christmas break when i don't have so much junk to do for school.

how is Atlas Shrugged? You've piqued my curiosity!

dann
12-12-2005, 11:25 PM
"Anti-Semitic Policy in Albert Speer's Plans for the Rebuilding of Berlin" (from Art Bulletin Dec96 Vol. 78 Issue 4, p.622) by Paul B. Jaskot.

kikkert
12-13-2005, 10:20 AM
A friend of mine loaned me Art Spiegelman's In the Shadow of No Towers a month ago. I finally took the time to sit down last night and really read it and let myself react and reflect on everything that has happened since 9/11, sans spin, fluff, artificial "patriotism" and all that b.s. Sobering.

dann
12-13-2005, 05:57 PM
A friend of mine loaned me Art Spiegelman's In the Shadow of No Towers a month ago. I finally took the time to sit down last night and really read it and let myself react and reflect on everything that has happened since 9/11, sans spin, fluff, artificial "patriotism" and all that b.s. Sobering.

I forgot that it came out. I need to get it. Have you read the Maus books? So well done.

Tracy G
12-15-2005, 11:54 AM
I just finished Iceland's Bell by Halldór Laxness. This is a historical novel full of political satire and a gallows sense of humor.

dropscone
12-15-2005, 12:57 PM
I just finished The Time Traveller's Wife, which I enjoyed very much.

I am having an ongoing struggle with Bill Bryson's 'A short history of nearly everything', which although it's touted as a pop-sci lay-person's guide obviously isn't lay enough for my ignorant self.

gladcow
12-15-2005, 03:20 PM
Just started "Twilight Children" and it's all I want to read!

stegan
12-15-2005, 03:22 PM
Currently reading The Big Book of Losers (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1563892537/qid=1134681670/sr=8-2/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i2_xgl14/002-8383656-1932847?n=507846&s=books&v=glance) . Always good to make you feel better about yourself. :)

Then I'll probably move on to The Big Book of Hoaxes (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1563892529/qid=1134681738/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/002-8383656-1932847?s=books&v=glance&n=283155) . I loves hoaxes. :)

gur
01-10-2006, 11:17 AM
I've become best friends with the library again.
One year after I started this journey, I'm finally reading "Becoming Vegan". :p
Also on the list (and i refuse to be embarrassed); "Overcoming Shyness and Social Phobia (a step-by-step guide)" - Ronald M. Rapee

attackferret
01-10-2006, 02:51 PM
Also on the list (and i refuse to be embarrassed); "Overcoming Shyness and Social Phobia (a step-by-step guide)" - Ronald M. Rapeereport back and let us know if it's any good. i should probably read a book like that myself.

stegan
01-10-2006, 03:04 PM
I've become best friends with the library again.
This is one of my current resolutions, as it will save me immeasurable amounts of money that I would typically spend on books.

However, they probably wouldn't stock what I'm currently reading-

Arthur Neresian- The F**k Up

grog
01-10-2006, 03:07 PM
Library...is that where they keep the internet?

But seriously, I'm now paranoid about germs on the books at the library. You don't know where those things have been!

mishka
01-10-2006, 03:08 PM
"Overcoming Shyness and Social Phobia (a step-by-step guide)" - Ronald M. Rapee

report back and let us know if it's any good. i should probably read a book like that myself.
dit-to.

dropscone
01-10-2006, 03:19 PM
This is one of my current resolutions, as it will save me immeasurable amounts of money that I would typically spend on books.

However, they probably wouldn't stock what I'm currently reading-

Arthur Neresian- The F**k Up

I got my local library to order in Talking C*ck by Richard Herring. And then I never went and picked it up because I'd bought my own copy :uhoh: but they did get it in for me.

I can't go to the library at the moment because I've lost a book I've had out since November. I'm thinking I may have to pay for it to be replaced :(

Kat
01-10-2006, 03:31 PM
I'm reading a book called Fingersmith.

So far it's about this orphan girl who was raised by a household of thieves (in England a couple of hundred years ago), and now they're using her to con this family out of thousands of pounds.

Apparently there's a lesbian plotline coming up.

gur
01-10-2006, 08:22 PM
report back and let us know if it's any good. i should probably read a book like that myself.

dit-to.

wiiiiiiiillllllll do! ;)


However, they probably wouldn't stock what I'm currently reading-

Arthur Neresian- The F**k Up

just fer kicks i looked that up in the catalogue and they didn't have it :p

JasperKat
01-15-2006, 01:26 PM
Almost done with "The Mommy Myth" by Susan Douglas and Meredith Michael. I'm not a mommy, and I don't plan on being one, but it's interesting to learn about how media manipulates our images of ourselves and can foster such feelings of inadequacy. Some good insights on the rewriting of history by politicians and talking heads, particuarly on the subjects of feminism and woman's rights.

It covers some important topics without being dry, it's actually pretty witty and sarcastic.

-JK

attackferret
01-21-2006, 11:41 AM
Calling all those with wanderlust! i bought Tales of a Female Nomad by Rita Golden Gelman on a whim last night... and once i'd read a few pages, i couldn't put it down. It was finished before I went to sleep :) Essentially, at 48 Rita went on a several month trip to mexico as part of a marriage break... and when she and her husband got divorced, in her newfound freedom she realized she was making enough money to just wander around the globe and live among the people she finds. And she does! The woman has guts :cool: warning: you may find yourself with a sudden insatiable desire to live in Bali for a while. I know I'm in that predicament.

Oh, also, if you really can't stand hearing anything about meat eating/preparing/slaughter as it's done in third world countries... don't read this book.

stegan
01-21-2006, 11:50 AM
warning: you may find yourself with a sudden insatiable desire to live in Bali for a while. I know I'm in that predicament.

Considering I just finished reading The F**k Up , which is about a writer from the midwest who moves to NYC in the early 80's and spends most of his time dirt poor and getting the crap kicked out of him, and I wanted to move back to NYC, I think I'll avoid that one too. Thanks :)

mamaquilla
01-21-2006, 01:11 PM
old editions of CatFancy magazine my 9 year old brought home from school from the library :)

oldradical
01-21-2006, 02:41 PM
I currently have five library books checked out:

End of the Beginning, which is one of Harry Turtledove's alternate histories...this one about the Pearl Harbor/WWII locale and era;

Living in Hell, by Gharzal Omid (a pen name), an Iranian woman recounting her life in Islamic Iran and her escape to Europe;

Shadow of the Giant, one of the Ender series by Orson Scott Card;

First In, by Gary C. Schroen, which is about the CIA's lead in the "war on terror" in Afghanistan; and

The Green Lantern, by Jerome Charyn, a fictional account of a theatrical troupe's presenting King Lear in Stalinist Russia.

I've read a number of books by both Turtledove and Card, and like their writing very much (though in my opinion Turtledove should stick with what he does best, alternate history); I've not read anything by the other three authors.

kikkert
02-02-2006, 09:28 AM
Promise to the Land: Essays on Rural Women by Joan Jensen

Kat
02-02-2006, 09:31 AM
How is that, Kikkert?

(I haven't heard of it, but I'm interested in the subject.)

kikkert
02-02-2006, 11:52 AM
How is that, Kikkert?I think I'm going through a period of getting in touch with my rural roots or something... I already try to live simply and now I'm planning a small garden, learning about living off the land and how to live in a collective (I'm a flaming socialist), reading about the struggles of women who farm as a way to live and how patriarchal systems keep many women doing "women's work" and men doing "real work." (which is such utter BS) I'm even planning to meet up with my large extended family at both my family reunion and at the Grange Fair this year (they are not farmers now but are very Country).

Anyhoo, for this book I have read the introduction (gives a great overview of the whole collection - quite a bit of history and politics and gender issues), the first essay (which is about the author's stint on a commune - the little bits about the rabbits made me queasy) and I just started reading essay two (which jumps to Wisconsin to chronicle her immigrant grandmother).

You can go here http://www.ruralwomyn.net/ and scroll down - on the left of the page click on Big List of Books to read about this book and lots and lots of others. Actually, the whole website rocks.

gur
02-02-2006, 03:31 PM
Also on the list (and i refuse to be embarrassed); "Overcoming Shyness and Social Phobia (a step-by-step guide)" - Ronald M. Rapee


report back and let us know if it's any good. i should probably read a book like that myself.

yo. i'm back with my report.
this is really a book that is supposed to be read over the course of a few weeks or months (i found out as i was reading that it's really more like a workbook), but i read it in two days (it's only a few hundred pages). i'd say it opened up my mind a bit to what i should be doing to get over my shyness a bit more. there were some key points to pay close attention to, such as 'reality thinking' and then putting your realistic thinking to the test (that's one of the 'work' parts). it's about internal dialogue to a certain extent - which a lot of people have trouble with (ie: "i can't believe i just said that; they'll think i'm so stupid") one important thing to learn is "so what?"
in the end i would recommend this book to anyone. i might pick it up again and really do the work more than what i'm doing now. some suggestions have definitely stuck in my head, which is good.

The Frumious Bandersnatch
02-03-2006, 04:35 AM
I'm re-reading 'King Ink II' a selection of lyrics/poems/illustrations/scribbles by Nick Cave (Birthday Party).

Suitably dark for a freezing February morn - the collection revists his favourite themes of drink, love, loss and death.

:)

chikara_no_tori
02-03-2006, 05:17 AM
I am reading (or attempting to) 3 books simultaneously...

1) "The Monster At Our Door" by Mike Davis about the Avian Flu (and if that does not at least encourage a few carnivores to go Vegan...I really don't know what will...

2) "Vampire Hunter D" by Hideyuki Kikuchi, which if there are any anime fans here, is (FINALLY) official translation of some very well written Japanese novels. The tone is dry, to the point...and if you look close enough, there is some clever social commentary in it too.

3) "The Eye of the World" by Robert Jordan is something I read back in middle to high school (call it revisting my youth), and high-fantasy much like Tolkien.

bluemango
02-03-2006, 12:18 PM
I'm reading two books: "Culture Jam," which is largely about how our culture is becoming completely defined by our corporations, companies, and advertisers. I'm not far into it so far, but it's really good. I'm also reading "The Other Daughter," a book one of my students lent me. It's not high literature, but it's mindless and suspenseful entertainment - you know, murder, scandal, sex, brainwashing, the works. I like reading unintelligent but entertaining things sometimes!

Dandelion
02-03-2006, 02:27 PM
it's about internal dialogue to a certain extent - which a lot of people have trouble with (ie: "i can't believe i just said that; they'll think i'm so stupid") one important thing to learn is "so what?"
this is basically what i do when confronted with a social situation i get nervous about. i gotta let it go and say 'so what!'
nobody believes me when i say i'm shy.

gladcow
02-03-2006, 02:42 PM
this is basically what i do when confronted with a social situation i get nervous about. i gotta let it go and say 'so what!'
nobody believes me when i say i'm shy.
I believe you. You're shy like me. :)
I don't believe MissLovely when she says she's shy, because I've seen her in action... :o Take her to a party, you talk to all kinds of people :D :heart:

gur
02-03-2006, 02:51 PM
this is basically what i do when confronted with a social situation i get nervous about. i gotta let it go and say 'so what!'
nobody believes me when i say i'm shy.


I believe you. You're shy like me.
I don't believe MissLovely when she says she's shy, because I've seen her in action... Take her to a party, you talk to all kinds of people

the things one learns in a book thread! :)
i have to say, it's very freeing to let go and just not give a hoot what people think! (i've been practising :p)

oldradical
02-03-2006, 02:55 PM
Among others, I'm reading West-Bloc Dissident: A Cold War Memoir, by William Blum. Very engaging writing by an ex-CIA employee. I'm only on page 35, but am sure this is one I'll want to read through to the end.

oldradical
02-17-2006, 06:04 PM
Actually, Mr. Blum--whose book I am still reading and greatly enjoy--worked for the State Department.

Other books in progress: Year of the Hangman: George Washington's Campaign Against the Iroquois, by Glenn F. Wiliams; The Fourth Crusade and the Sack of Constantinople, by Jonathan Phillips; What I Saw: Reports from Berlin, 1920-1933, by Joseph Roth; Top NAZI: SS General Karl Wolff, The Man Between Hitler and Himmler, by Jochen Von Lang; and today I just received a book on order, Oh Terrifying Mother: Sexuality, Violence and Worship of the Goddess Kali, by Sarah Caldwell.

Whew.

grog
02-17-2006, 06:06 PM
smarty