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Husky Corn Star
06-13-2004, 04:27 AM
This thread !!! :brood:

misanthropy
06-27-2004, 08:13 PM
Currently reading Terrorists or Freedom Fighters: Reflections on the Liberation of Animals.

jenbizagogo
06-27-2004, 08:39 PM
Currently reading Terrorists or Freedom Fighters: Reflections on the Liberation of Animals.

Ohh! I've been wanting to read that book...you'll have to let me know how it is!

Wonko The Sane
06-27-2004, 10:01 PM
I should be reading "I Am What I Am" by Joan Hannington, but Dviolet snatched it up as soon as it got here.

...Oh, and she's here yelling at me now for writing this. I can't win.

misanthropy
06-27-2004, 10:56 PM
Ohh! I've been wanting to read that book...you'll have to let me know how it is!So far I've only read the first chapter and it's awesome! You can actually read the first chapter here: http://utminers.utep.edu/best/papers/exerpts/TOFF/Behind_The_Mask_p1.htm

twstdfrk
07-03-2004, 11:55 PM
As for fiction I am reading and enjoying The Hobbit by J.R.R Tolkien [of course comic books too:rolleyes:] and in non-fiction I am reading Che Guevara Talks To Young people.:thumbsup:

pB0t
07-04-2004, 02:14 AM
"The Animal Rights Debate" by Tom Regan and Carl Cohen.

JasonSt
08-13-2004, 11:51 PM
I just read "Factotum", "Pulp", and "Ham on Rye", all by Charles Bukowski in three days, if that is any indication of how much I enjoyed them. However, CB tends to be a bit, mmm, vulgar, which might offend some.

LittleHottie
08-14-2004, 01:44 AM
I just finished reading 'Invisible Monsters' by Chuck Pahalniuk and am now reading another book by him called 'Lullaby'.

Emiloid
08-14-2004, 03:45 AM
I just finished Johnny Got His Gun the other day. Wow, that is one intense book! Next I'll be reading the latest Harry Potter book and Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them by Al Franken. Gotta have variety!

spike003
08-14-2004, 11:54 AM
I guess vegans like to read! I started looking at who read what, but it got to be a long list so I cut to the chase. I'm currently reading MY ISHMEAL. It's number 2 of 3 books by Daniel Quinn. I loved the first, ISHMEAL. I think you'd all get a kick outta these books and they make you think about how humans conduct themselves on the planet and how we treat nature and where we're headed. I also recommend LAMB by Chris Moore. It's about Jesus' boy hood pal Biff(not a religious book, but humor). Check them out!

herbi
08-14-2004, 12:38 PM
Oh boy do I hate Charles Bukowski... :p I never understood what people like about him! Maybe you can explain, JasonSt? (For what it's worth, I also absolutely loathe Steinbeck, Burroughs, and other guys who seem to like to only write about unpleasant f***'d up stuff...)

Emiloid, I just read "Lies & the Lying Liars Who Tell Them"! :) I thought it was good (WAY better than F9/11...) and I love Al Franken. So smart and funny. I'm sure there are plenty of lies told on the Left side of things as well, but, this is still a good book. Try looking it up on the internet sometime-- there are a host of ANTI-Franken and anti-"Lies" sites out there attempting to refute him, mostly by making distortions of their own or attempting to spin his obvious jokes (he is, after all, a comedian) as "lies" themselves. :rolleyes: Uh, what a comedian says as a joke is a little different than what a newsanchor or politician presents as a fact, guys...

Besides that, my last library trip included:

"Inside the Animal Mind", a collection of nuggets about animal intelligence and communication by George Page, creator of the PBS show Nature-- it was very interesting, and pro-animal-consciousness, but didn't have too much information that isn't common knowledge if you're into that field.

"When Animals Speak - Advanced Interspecies Communication" by Penelope Smith-- this one is CRAP. Don't waste your time. I thought it was more like the science-based one above, but I should've looked at it more closely instead of just grabbing off the "animal" shelf & running out... It's really the memoirs of an "animal communicator", loaded with long rambling poetry, New-Agey purple prose allegedly psychically dictated by animals (you know, "I am the Wise Owl Spirit, and I will take you to the skies with me if you will clean up the pollution..." (only more Thee and Thou and junk)), and especially irritating, the assertion that mass breeding of sled dogs and then euthanizing those who don't make the team is OK, because all those constant puppies provide an easy "entry point" for dog souls wanting to get back into dog bodies quickly, and they know the risks when they make that deal, and are OK with it. WTF?!?! :furious: Also, an entire section devoted to defending why she isn't a vegetarian-- see, she used to be, but then "her body needed meat" and then she had a "vision" of a cow offering herself to be eaten, and then she spoke to some animals about to be slaughtered and they said they knew that's what they were for and they wanted to be eaten. Argh, argh, argh...

"For Love of Insects" by Thomas Eisner. He's a long-time professor at Cornell and the nicest sweetest old man with the cutest most devoted little wife/research partner. Right before I started at the SPCA in Ithaca, I was working at University Photo on campus, and we handled a lot of the slides being sent to the publisher for this book, so it's nice to see the finished product. It's not the most vegan of books, since he does experiment on live insects and kill and dissect some insects, but, for what it's worth, I can personally vouch for the fact that he takes extraordinary care of them, and that he is more careful to anesthetize these bugs and make them comfortable, etc, than many researchers are with mammals and birds. If you're comfortable reading a book inextricably linked to biological animal experimentation, you will see some INCREDIBLE photographs-- his specialty is close-up detail portraits of insects doing what they evolved to do, showcasing a stunning array of behavioral and physical/chemical adaptations. It's written in a nice narrative style, and there's a strong conservation theme.

Emiloid
08-14-2004, 03:24 PM
"When Animals Speak - Advanced Interspecies Communication" by Penelope Smith-- this one is CRAP. Don't waste your time.
Your description makes me want to see this book. It sounds hilarious!

JasonSt
08-14-2004, 08:32 PM
I just finished reading 'Invisible Monsters' by Chuck Pahalniuk and am now reading another book by him called 'Lullaby'.

I love both of those books, as well as everything else he has written. He may be part of the allure of Portland, OR for me since that is where he hails from.

Follows are more posts since I don't know how to quote multiple sources in one reply.

JasonSt
08-14-2004, 08:34 PM
Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them by Al Franken. Gotta have variety!

This one had me laughing and simultaneously punching my wall. I read many of the refutations and they mostly come off as people splitting hairs about the meaning of "the".

JasonSt
08-14-2004, 08:44 PM
Oh boy do I hate Charles Bukowski... :p I never understood what people like about him! Maybe you can explain, JasonSt?

I think him vulgar and offensive, specifically towards women. But his observations about the banalities of menial work, relationships of convenience, and general disgust for the masses drifting through life on auto-pilot really strike a chord of consonant harmony with me.

"Pulp" really made me laugh, too.

That's all I got. What I probably like most about Bukowski is that I am merely socially awkward while he is rather socially inept. Or maybe I admire that he just doesn't give a damn? I was also a letter carrier for the US Postal Service for a year and the first novel I read by him was "Post Office", which I really could relate to.

catlike
08-17-2004, 08:14 PM
right now I am finishing a bio on queen elizabeth but I started to read Love is Letting Go of Fear by Jampolsky. This book and the other one entitled Forgiveness have changed my life and attitude in amazing ways. Definitly recommended by me.

jenbizagogo
08-18-2004, 09:52 AM
The last book I read was Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. Guy Montag rocks!

I've just started Terrorists or Freedom Fighters by Steve Best, who I recently saw give a very compelling speech on the subject at the AR20004 conference.

PeriledSoul
08-18-2004, 12:26 PM
Im making my way through Stephen Kings Dark Tower series for the 3rd time in eager anticipation for his VERY LAST book coming out ever, "The Dark Tower".

Ive also been slowly going through Che Guevara Speaks... not because its hard, but because of Stephen King, damns yous! :p

dviolet
08-18-2004, 11:01 PM
Just finished "Bringing Down the House." It's a fascinating true story about MIT kids who legally won millions of dollars in Vegas playing blackjack using a sophisticated card-counting method.

I just started "Exception to the Rulers" by Amy Goldman. It was given to me as a housewarming present by Lorin - (thanks Lorin!). So far, it is a great read filled with the lies, deception and conspiracies by the current US administration. It's interesting - even if totally biased towards the left. No mention of anything Clinton ever did wrong, but oh well. He is my favorite president after all. (only half-kidding)

dviolet
08-18-2004, 11:02 PM
The last book I read was Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. Guy Montag rocks!

I was going to read that one, but I decided to burn it instead. :p

jenbizagogo
08-18-2004, 11:36 PM
I was going to read that one, but I decided to burn it instead. :p

:silly: Oh hahaha! :)

Emiloid
08-20-2004, 02:53 PM
I just started "Exception to the Rulers" by Amy Goldman.
Dude! That's Amy Goodman! :p
I saw her speak in Booneville (CA), and she's going to be in Chico next month... if any of you get a chance to see her live DO IT!!! The cost is typically sliding-scale and proceeds benefit local community radio stations. For info, go to the Democracy Now (http://www.democracynow.org/) website.

kimmysoo
08-20-2004, 03:09 PM
I'm getting ready to go on vaca (my boyfriend and I rented a tiny little cottage on the lake... just us and the dogs for an entire week.. wooo hoooo!) and I'm bringing along "Rattling the Cage - Towards Legal Rights for Animals" by Steven Wise and "Empty Cages" by Tom Regan. Haven't had a chance to read them yet... they've been laying around the house collecting dust.

Has anyone gotten through "Rattling the Cage?" The chapter about Jerome, one of the primates, really really got to me and I couldn't get any further... too emotional. :bawling:

misanthropy
09-05-2004, 09:44 PM
Finally bought The Pig Who Sang to the Moon: The Emotional World of Farm Animals (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/034545281X/qid=1094438314/sr=8-3/ref=pd_ka_3/102-2181177-7024935?v=glance&s=books&n=507846) by Jeffrey Masson.

So far it's amazing. I already have When Elephants Weep and The Emperor's Embrace

buddadragon
09-05-2004, 11:15 PM
Just finished "Every Second Counts" and "It's Not About The Bike". Both are writen by Lance Armstrong and are about his battle with cancer and how he uses that to motivate his life on and off the bike. Good stuff. Mouse and I were in the "Loop" Sat. It's St. Louis's version on the Village in NYC. We found a great book store and I purchased "The Sacred Willow" by Duong Van Mai Elliot. It's the true story of four generations of a Vietnamese family. Looking forward to reading it. I also picked up "On Gold Mountain" by Lisa See. It's about a hundred year history of a Chinese American family.

catlike
09-07-2004, 12:57 PM
I finished the Queen Elizabeth bio and now I'm reading Anna Karenina.

Music Girl
09-07-2004, 01:03 PM
Bouncing back and forth between "The Silmarillion" by Tolkein
and "the Meaning of Life" by Viktor Frankl.

grog
09-07-2004, 01:29 PM
now I'm reading Anna Karenina.

You must have some time to kill :silly: I tried to read that once and it defeated me, one of the few books that have, the other of course, is "Being and Time" by Heidegger, which thoroughly convinced me not to study philosophy anymore.

grog
09-07-2004, 01:31 PM
Bouncing back and forth between "The Silmarillion" by Tolkein .

Yay, a LOTR fan. Even as a LOTR g33k though, I only read The Silmarillion once. I almost went blind. Too much like the book of Genesis for me. I don't care much for who begat who. The Lost Tales stuff is all pretty good though.

mountainvegan
09-07-2004, 02:34 PM
the other of course, is "Being and Time" by Heidegger, which thoroughly convinced me not to study philosophy anymore.

Heh, no wonder you decided against philosophy after that. :o I haven't read Being and Time myself, but from what I've read about it, it should be read after acquiring a taste for (or a really good background in) philosophy, not as a sampler. ;)

mountainvegan
09-07-2004, 02:35 PM
"the Meaning of Life" by Viktor Frankl.

My wife said that book is awesome.

gladcow
09-07-2004, 03:40 PM
Just finished the Poisonwood Bible. I may be one of the last people on earth to read it. After working at a bookstore I began to hate bestsellers and stayed far away from them. I have recovered. ;)

Tracy G
09-07-2004, 04:31 PM
Tee hee hee. Another recovered former bookstore employee here. Just started The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency by Alexander McCall Smith.

gladcow
09-07-2004, 04:43 PM
Tee hee hee. Another recovered former bookstore employee here. Just started The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency by Alexander McCall Smith.
Oooh, I just finished that one a little while back. I really liked it, now I have to find the next one in the series.
What bookstore did you work for? I worked for Borders for 6 years. Glad to be gone :D

Music Girl
09-07-2004, 05:56 PM
Grog!
I feel your pain.
I have been working on the Simirillion for a month now, and normally I read fast. The difficulty with the geneology is what is making me read two books at once.

Still, the Simirillion has some amazing stories in it buried between the long and boring family trees and geography lessons. I just can't get over the fact that something this detailed and thought out came out of one person's head!!!

Music Girl
09-07-2004, 06:00 PM
MV - It IS awesome, and there are tons of used copies on amazon and half dot com for just a couple of bucks.

An amazing story by an amazing man. I am just speechless reading about how the Jews were treated in the labor camps - it was only a generation ago, and it seems like so many people have forgotten about it, more or less. 6 million Jews slaughtered in that war - for no other reason other than being Jewish. Crazy.....

VeganKen
09-07-2004, 07:02 PM
Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, by Susanna Clarke.

herbi
09-07-2004, 07:19 PM
I'm almost finished with Quicksilver, by Neal Stephenson, and already have the second volume of the Baroque Cycle, The Confusion checked out from the library & waitin'.

I third Grog's motion that the Silmarillion be compared to something out of the Old Testament! :p

Tracy G
09-07-2004, 08:44 PM
Oooh, I just finished that one a little while back. I really liked it, now I have to find the next one in the series.
What bookstore did you work for? I worked for Borders for 6 years. Glad to be gone :D

I'm really liking The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency, too—I started reading it this afternoon and am already half done!

I worked at the local independent bookstore for a year (Jan.-Dec. 2003) on a part-time basis (9-11 hours per week). It was my first and so far only experience in the world of retail. It was good for the first seven months. But I do prefer being my own boss. :D

purplemackerel
09-08-2004, 03:22 AM
We bought "Vegan" by Tony Weston (of the Vegan Society), and Yvonne Bishop yesterday.
It's a cookbook with over 90 amazing recipes - including Caribbean Crumble, Jamaican Patties, veg kebabs with Satay sauce :drool: , and I can't wait to try them all. I may post one or two in the food section to tempt you to buy it too.

Fiction-wise, I've just read Beyond Indigo by Preethi Nair. The opening scene of the protagonist hurling a saffron-stained coconut over London Bridge at 6.30 am, had me gripped from the start.
I love the Number 1 Detective Agency series too.

wildgeese
09-08-2004, 10:03 AM
I'm re-reading On the Black Hill by Bruce Chatwin. One of the most beautiful books I've ever read.

catlike
09-12-2004, 12:03 AM
You must have some time to kill :silly: I tried to read that once and it defeated me, one of the few books that have, the other of course, is "Being and Time" by Heidegger, which thoroughly convinced me not to study philosophy anymore.

Really, I find it intrigueing. It deals with a subject matter very close to my heart...tragic love. Not to mention the politics. I really like it but maybe it has something to do with the translation. Some people prefer different translations, but I don't know who did this one.

misanthropy
10-03-2004, 10:55 PM
Currently reading Nickel & Dimed: On (not) getting by in America (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0805063897/qid=1096861945/sr=8-1/ref=pd_csp_1/104-6664793-5575958?v=glance&s=books&n=507846). It's really good! The insight into the working poor isn't new to me, but it's important that people who don't know a lot about this read this book.

Book Description:

The New York Times bestseller, and one of the most talked about books of the year, Nickel and Dimed has already become a classic of undercover reportage.

Millions of Americans work for poverty-level wages, and one day Barbara Ehrenreich decided to join them. She was inspired in part by the rhetoric surrounding welfare reform, which promised that any job equals a better life. But how can anyone survive, let alone prosper, on $6 to $7 an hour? To find out, Ehrenreich moved from Florida to Maine to Minnesota, taking the cheapest lodgings available and accepting work as a waitress, hotel maid, house cleaner, nursing-home aide, and Wal-Mart salesperson. She soon discovered that even the "lowliest" occupations require exhausting mental and physical efforts. And one job is not enough; you need at least two if you intend to live indoors.

Nickel and Dimed reveals low-wage America in all its tenacity, anxiety, and surprising generosity -- a land of Big Boxes, fast food, and a thousand desperate strategies for survival. Instantly acclaimed for its insight, humor, and passion, this book is changing the way America perceives its working poor.

dviolet
10-03-2004, 11:01 PM
Oh that sounds like a great book, Misanthropy. I am putting it on my wishlist right now! I love this kind of non-fiction.

misanthropy
10-03-2004, 11:06 PM
Oh that sounds like a great book, Misanthropy. I am putting it on my wishlist right now! I love this kind of non-fiction.Another good one on this topic is Merchants of Misery (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1567510825/qid=1096862709/sr=8-1/ref=pd_csp_1/104-6664793-5575958?v=glance&s=books&n=507846). I haven't read it yet, but some friends that have said it was really good.

dviolet
10-03-2004, 11:06 PM
Currently reading Nickel & Dimed: On (not) getting by in America (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0805063897/qid=1096861945/sr=8-1/ref=pd_csp_1/104-6664793-5575958?v=glance&s=books&n=507846). It's really good! The insight into the working poor isn't new to me, but it's important that people who don't know a lot about this read this book.

I just clicked on the link and found two amusing things: 1) it's paired with Fast Food Nation, which I was thinking it sounded like while reading the description here. and 2) I love the irony in this customer review on Amazon:

"the most trying part of this book was the editing. this woman is a PhD. did no one edit her? there were so many grammatical errors, particularly ending sentances in a preposition that it became distracting to me while reading."

Love it!!!! There are some other good ones about it being liberal garbage, but I'll let you read the rest yourselves.

misanthropy
10-03-2004, 11:12 PM
Yeah, the writing itself isn't that great, but reading about her experiences was very interesting. The situation among the working poor in the U.S. is very similar to how it is here in Canada.

misanthropy
10-03-2004, 11:30 PM
Oh, I just bought Merchants of Misery direct from the publisher if anyone's interested. (http://www.commoncouragepress.com) Good selection of socio-political books there.

Another great publisher is http://www.lanternbooks.com.

JasonSt
10-04-2004, 12:37 AM
I just read (and will be perpetually re-reading) CARtoons (http://www.andysinger.com/car-toons.html) by Andy Singer. It is a book of comics with a wealth of statistics that scream "the automobile will be the demise of the world!"

There is a sample CARtoon here. (http://www.plantbasedpeople.com/showthread.php?t=4477)

I've been wanting to read Nickel and Dimed but had forgotten about it. Thanks for the reminder misanthropy!

lex_talionis
10-04-2004, 08:10 AM
rereading _Maxwell's Demon_ by Hans Christian Von Bayer, and for fun, reading _Guards, Guards!_ by Terry Prachett

jagged-little-pill
10-04-2004, 10:20 AM
I just finished reading 'Catcher In The Rye' which is amazing and I also just read 'The Curious Incident OF The Dog In The Nightime' which was interesting! I'm reading 'The Remains of the Day' and 'A Room With a View' at the moment tho for school! phew.

But I would so recomend the first two! :laugh:

My friends wee saying today how good 'The Outsider' is today...so im gonna read that!

grog
10-04-2004, 11:26 AM
I just finished reading 'Catcher In The Rye'

Good Job, Old Man!

Emiloid
10-04-2004, 11:57 AM
I loved Nickel & Dimed! An interesting, quick read. :D
I'm just reading for school thesedays, but my "to read" stack is getting taller, and my "to read list" is getting longer.... :uhoh:

jagged-little-pill
10-04-2004, 03:12 PM
Good Job, Old Man!
:blank: I say..steady on before I put on my person hunting hat! :umm:

spidermonkey
10-04-2004, 05:19 PM
I've been trying to get through The Seven Daughters of Eve by Bryan Sykes for the past couple of months. It's an awesome book, but I don't have a lot of extra time each day for fun reading. :p

matriarco
10-04-2004, 06:12 PM
I'm reading Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides. I just started, but I like it so far.

zatoichi
10-04-2004, 08:27 PM
lies, and the lying liars who tell them. it's leading me to believe that right-wingers truly are lying bastards and that it's not just a simple matter of differing viewpoints...
very entertaining for a book about politics. they should give al franken his own political punditry show.

i now need to buckle down and start reading the consolation of philosophy for school... problem is, i'm supposed to take notes, which means i won't be able to focus on the material. which means i need to find a website with a good summary guide i can steal from so i can read unhindered.

Adams
10-04-2004, 11:11 PM
lies, and the lying liars who tell them. I love that book! Well, I should say that I did love it. I didn't finish reading it because my roommate took it away from me! :brood: But it was really funny while it lasted! :laugh:

Adams
10-04-2004, 11:13 PM
Right now I'm reading "The Culture of Terrorism" by Noam Chomsky. And while I just started I'm pretty sure it's going to be about American state terrorism and not the more topical "radical Muslim" terrorism.

attackferret
10-04-2004, 11:39 PM
I loved Nickel & Dimed! An interesting, quick read. :D

Nickel and Dimed was an awesome book. Right now I'm reading a book called Our Stolen Future. The tagline is "Are we threatening our fertility, intelligence, and survival? A scientific detective story." I highly recommend it :yes:

tylehu
10-18-2004, 03:45 PM
I'm reading "The Celestine Prophecy" by James Redfield. It's non-fiction, but written like a novel. I couldn't put it down.... I recommend it ti anyone who requests a good book.

grog
10-18-2004, 04:20 PM
I'm reading "The Celestine Prophecy" by James Redfield. It's non-fiction, but written like a novel. I couldn't put it down.... I recommend it ti anyone who requests a good book.

I think its debateable whether or not its "non-fiction".

It should certainly be read with a healthy amount of skepticism.

http://www.csj.org/pub_csj/csjbookreview/csjbkrev112celestine.htm

Wonko The Sane
10-18-2004, 04:57 PM
I've read Celestine Prophecy as well as the sequel, The Tenth Insight. They are certainly NOT non-fiction. They are novels, written to seem like a true story. They are, however, excellent books.

I would certainly suggest putting them on your reading list.

Lacykitten
10-18-2004, 06:11 PM
I've been reading "An Evil Spirit Out of the West" by Paul Doherty. It's an Egyptian themed book detailing the life of Ankhenaten through the eyes of Mahu, his chief of police. It's pretty much teenage life through death I think and very interesting.

I have about 1/5 to go, but it's been on pause for about a month because I've been sick and not able to concentrate on reading. Shbee. It's so good. I love Egyptian themed stuff.

Emiloid
10-21-2004, 08:35 PM
I'm reading The Little Friend. I really like it, and I'm only a few dozen pages into it. :)

The Celestine Prophesy... hmmm. It seems like people either really like it or (to be tactful) don't. I didn't care for it, but I know people who loved it and it even changed their lives. It's certainly interesting.

a_nnoyance
10-22-2004, 05:50 AM
I'm currently re-reading Schrödinger's Kittens and the Search for Reality by John Gribbin, because it's so damn good.. Other than that I'm usually reading something by Bertrand Russell(I'm trying to get through his entire catalogue, but I doubt it'll happen any time soon!)..

lex_talionis
10-22-2004, 07:27 AM
_Mr. Reaper_, Terry Prachett

dirt
10-22-2004, 02:50 PM
a zine called the undisirables, about class and facets of society in the 21st century... and a book called the 12th planet, its wierd stuff about aliens and the bible... not my usual read...

carnelian
10-22-2004, 11:16 PM
The Lord of the Rings - The Two Towers - J.R.R. Tolkien

Stitches
10-22-2004, 11:47 PM
"The Divine Comedy" by Dante Alighieri. Can't say I agree with his map of the cosmos, but still interesting.

JasonSt
10-23-2004, 04:25 PM
Conscience of a Liberal by the late Paul Wellstone

purplemackerel
10-24-2004, 06:25 AM
The Valley of Secrets by Charmian Hussey.
A beautifully written fable for modern times, and a riverting read. Don't be put off by the fact that it's classed as a children's book, it's far more intelligent than Harry Potter, and can be read on several levels. I do a lot of reading for work, college, and pleasure, this book has to be one of the best I've read in a long time.

Music Girl
10-26-2004, 09:17 PM
Wizard and Glass - Stephen King

I'm reading through the entire Dark Tower series again.
I have the hots for Roland.

Tracy G
10-26-2004, 09:44 PM
Genius: The Life and Science of Richard Feynman by James Gleick. I found a nice first edition copy for $6.50 in a used bookstore yesterday.

grog
10-26-2004, 09:57 PM
Wizard and Glass - Stephen King

I'm reading through the entire Dark Tower series again.
I have the hots for Roland.

I didn't realize it was done, I think I've only read through 4. I went to try to buy a box set of the whole series, because I've seen really nice oversize paperbacks with good artwork. But they only do the first few books that way, and I think the last one is hardback only now. So I guess I'll wait...or go to the library...

zatoichi
10-26-2004, 10:00 PM
parts of the koran for my world literature class. can't say i care for it much. it reads like a rulebook, and whenever biblical prophets and stories are brought it, it mostly just points out how the jews and christians got it wrong. and there isn't much room for interpretation as everything as stated very matter-of-factly... spousal abuse is encouraged and everyone that isn't muslim is evil and going to hell. and this is the exact word of god... revisions, according to the book, just aren't possible. at least the bible is somewhat ambiguous. it still sort of bothers me that cat stephens became yusuf islam.

jesa
10-27-2004, 12:23 AM
Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.....not the first time though :p

And I will soon be reading Pilgrim's Progress...again....by Bunyan, for my brit lit class

Stitches
10-28-2004, 01:50 AM
The Bad Girl's Guide to Getting Personal. Good stuff.

Emiloid
10-28-2004, 12:30 PM
I'm reading my Voter Information Guide, trying to make sense of the 16 measures/propositions on my ballot. I feel like I'm studying for finals, but with more than a grade at stake! :confused:

Tracy G
10-30-2004, 12:46 PM
An Alchemy of Mind by Diane Ackerman.

Nanashi
10-30-2004, 01:23 PM
I'm reading 'House of Leaves' by Mark Danielewski. I found it through listening to Poe's album 'Haunted'. Brother and sister released these as companions to each other.

There's more to the house than it's dimensions, which alone are something, measuring more inside than out.

zatoichi
10-30-2004, 11:57 PM
i should be reading the third act of othello. but am i?

gladcow
11-01-2004, 02:17 PM
"The Object of My Affection" by Steve Martin!
I waited forever for it to come out in paperback. So glad I get to read it now!!!

herbi
11-01-2004, 06:13 PM
FINALLY read Dominion by Matthew Scully, Sacred Cows and Golden Geese by the Greeks, and Drawing the Line by Michael Wise. (Busy reading schedule ;)) Also on the non-AR tip, In the Beginning... was the Command Line by Neal Stephenson, refreshed myself with the last Kage Baker book I'd read (Graveyard Game - everything of hers newer than that is on my Hold list right now at the library :)), and just finished Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden. I liked it!

Stitches
11-02-2004, 01:32 AM
I'm reading 'House of Leaves' by Mark Danielewski. I found it through listening to Poe's album 'Haunted'. Brother and sister released these as companions to each other.

There's more to the house than it's dimensions, which alone are something, measuring more inside than out.

I discovered both when "Hey Pretty" made it onto the radio three years ago. Good stuff.

Tracy G
11-08-2004, 11:35 AM
Orlando by Virginia Woolf.

zatoichi
11-10-2004, 02:40 PM
http://images.amazon.com/images/P/1576753018.01._SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg

has anyone read this or heard anything about it? i happened upon an interview with the author on some public radio station i wasn't familiar with. he was talking about america's hijacking of other nations' economies and how basically, this was the cause (or a major factor anyway) of 9/11 and the iraq war. here's the description from amazon.com:


Confessions of an Economic Hit Man reveals a game that, according to John Perkins, is "as old as Empire" but has taken on new and terrifying dimensions in an era of globalization. And Perkins should know. For many years he worked for an international consulting firm where his main job was to convince LDCs (less developed countries) around the world to accept multibillion-dollar loans for infrastructure projects and to see to it that most of this money ended up at Halliburton, Bechtel, Brown and Root, and other United States engineering and construction companies. This book, which many people warned Perkins not to write, is a blistering attack on a little-known phenomenon that has had dire consequences on both the victimized countries and the U.S.

i feel i must read this. sorry for the post about a book i've never read. i just got excited about it and wondered if anyone had any knowledge of it.

walrus
11-10-2004, 03:21 PM
"The Pig Who Sang To The Moon: The Emotional World of Farm Animals" by Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson. I'm in my second read. It's working as a nice reminder as to why I'm vegan. I love this book and would recommend it to anyone.

Tofuy
11-10-2004, 04:04 PM
i'm reading Trinity by Leon Uris. i think i'm gonna actualy get through it this time.

Music Girl
11-10-2004, 04:26 PM
Finally reading the Lovely Bones, and it's OK.
Not as great as I was expecting, though, considering how much everyone I know went crazy over it.....

Also reading the Beauty Myth (Naomi Wolfe.)

vegout
11-10-2004, 07:44 PM
I'm reading Ethics Into Action: Henry Spira and the Animal Rights Movement. It's pretty good...I wanted to know a little more about the history of the movement.

zatoichi
11-10-2004, 08:15 PM
"The Pig Who Sang To The Moon: The Emotional World of Farm Animals" by Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson. I'm in my second read. It's working as a nice reminder as to why I'm vegan. I love this book and would recommend it to anyone.

i've been meaning to find a good book on that subject. are you willing to make any garauntees? you don't have to give me a money-back garauntee, i just want you to stake your entire reputation of credibility on the recommendation. cool?

San
11-10-2004, 09:25 PM
I'm reading the Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin.

walrus
11-10-2004, 10:25 PM
i've been meaning to find a good book on that subject. are you willing to make any garauntees? you don't have to give me a money-back garauntee, i just want you to stake your entire reputation of credibility on the recommendation. cool?
It's cool. I guarantee it. Reputation of credibility included.

zatoichi
11-11-2004, 12:01 AM
cool. i look forward to it. but i might have to read 'confessions of an economic hitman' first..

and what just arrived in the mail but the third volume of the maxx comic collection. it's literature to me.

walrus
11-11-2004, 01:30 AM
cool. i look forward to it.
Do me a favor. When you're done reading it, will you let me know what you thought of it? I don't know of a single person that's read it besides me, and I'm starting to think I'm crazy for it. But I'm not. It really was good.

feenix101
11-11-2004, 05:59 AM
'Empty Cages:Facing the Challenge of Animal Rights" by Tom Regan

I'd definetly reccommend it for the people in your life who are curious about your veganism but not ready to commit.

gladcow
11-11-2004, 12:22 PM
"The Good Earth" by Pearl Buck
I'm surprised how many "classics" I've never read....

zatoichi
11-11-2004, 12:32 PM
Do me a favor. When you're done reading it, will you let me know what you thought of it? I don't know of a single person that's read it besides me, and I'm starting to think I'm crazy for it. But I'm not. It really was good.

certainly.

vegout
11-11-2004, 01:46 PM
I recently read The Pig Who Sang to the Moon: The Emotional World of Farm Animals. I loved it! I bought a few copies as Christmas presents (because it was at a local Book Warehouse, discounted in hard cover since it's out in paperback now!). I thought it was more informational and less...sappy (although I like them too) than some other books with stories about animal's feelings.

walrus
11-11-2004, 02:42 PM
I recently read The Pig Who Sang to the Moon: The Emotional World of Farm Animals. I loved it! I bought a few copies as Christmas presents (because it was at a local Book Warehouse, discounted in hard cover since it's out in paperback now!). I thought it was more informational and less...sappy (although I like them too) than some other books with stories about animal's feelings.
Excellent! There you go, Zatoichi. vegout read it and liked it. Now I don't feel so lonely!
Hey vegout, did you cry at all while reading it? I did, during the cow chapter.

vegout
11-11-2004, 07:10 PM
Hey walrusd1978,
Yeah...my eyes got a little moist. I love all animals, but as far as farm animals are concerned I'm especially a softy for cows and pigs. I think they're so beautiful and their eyes are expressive.
I checked out your website...awesome pictures and content. It's absolutely beautiful where you live! Are you anywhere close to the Farm Sanctuary CA location? (I know Cali is huge...I just thought that it's in Northern Cali near Sacramento somewhere).

walrus
11-11-2004, 07:23 PM
Hey walrusd1978,
Yeah...my eyes got a little moist. I love all animals, but as far as farm animals are concerned I'm especially a softy for cows and pigs. I think they're so beautiful and their eyes are expressive.

I would have to agree with you 100% on that. It was really hard to read it sometimes because you know what these creatures look like, and for him to go talking one minute about pigs living peacefully on a sanctuary to where those pigs came from was hard to deal with. I am soooo glad you read it!

I checked out your website...awesome pictures and content. It's absolutely beautiful where you live! Are you anywhere close to the Farm Sanctuary CA location? (I know Cali is huge...I just thought that it's in Northern Cali near Sacramento somewhere).
Hey, thanks for the great comments about my site! I actually took some more pictures today, because it's fall here, and I've never experienced anything so beautiful. I've never seen so many colors! I'm going to find a place to post them, but I'll probably put them on my site too. I'm pretty darn close to Farm Sanctuary, actually, and I'll be going to this next weekend: http://www.adoptaturkey.org/turkey_celebration.htm
I'm really excited. I'm hoping to take some pictures and also post those here somewhere. I'm above Sacramento, and about 200 miles from the Oregon border.

vegout
11-11-2004, 09:25 PM
walrusd1978,
I'm registered for the Turkey Celebration in New York State!! I don't have a digital camera, but I'll try to get pictures to share...and I suppose if we're going to continue on this, or for further personal comments (on your site, whatever), I should post a new thread or send you a personal e-mail??

lex_talionis
11-15-2004, 02:43 PM
just finished _why men don't listen and women can't read maps_

I don't know if it was any good. I'm trying to read relationship books, and have no idea which ones are good (they're damn expensive too!)

kimmysoo
11-22-2004, 03:17 PM
Checked this one out from the library over the weekend and am almost finished...

Hope in the Dark: Untold Histories, Wild Possibilities (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1560255773/qid=1101153733/sr=2-1/ref=pd_ka_b_2_1/103-4902325-4628612)

buddadragon
11-30-2004, 12:49 PM
Mouse got me "The Rape of Nanking" by Iris Chang. Im starting that today. *side note* She commited suicide a few weeks ago,35 years old. Really sad,she was beautiful inside and out.
http://www.vikingphoenix.com/public/rongstad/bio-0002/irischang.htm

Kat
11-30-2004, 12:51 PM
I'm in the midst of two books. The Colour of Magic by Terry Pratchett, and Invisible Woman - Confronting Weight Prejudice in America by W. Goodman.

grog
11-30-2004, 12:59 PM
I'm in the midst of two books. The Colour of Magic by Terry Pratchett,

Yay for Terry Pratchett.

Its turtles all way down!

zatoichi
11-30-2004, 01:21 PM
i finally finished lies, and the lying liars who tell them, which i've been reading on and off. i read the first part of don quixote for school. unfortunately it's abridged. it's great apart from the part where don quixote de la mancha slaughters a bunch of sheep, thinking they're enemy combatants. i think i'm becoming too sensitive as a vegan though. the fictional slaughtering of people wouldn't have really bothered me.

attackferret
11-30-2004, 09:25 PM
I read Therese Raquin by Emile Zola this weekend. It's a quick read, and very good.

mamaquilla
12-01-2004, 05:58 PM
Is all my moms fault! I am reading the Amelia Peabody series by Elizabeth Perkins. Im on the 8th book, there are 6 or more to go. They are fun historical mysteries. I love that Amelia is always veryyyyyy kind to the animals they encounter in her beloved Egypt or England.

I just got the Mad Cowboy from the library, that will be next =]

WadesMommy
12-01-2004, 09:34 PM
I'm reading The Tibetan Book of the Dead.

attackferret
12-01-2004, 09:37 PM
mamaquilla - My mom loves the Amelia Peabody series, and has tried to get me to read it more than once. Maybe I should give in :)

mamaquilla
12-01-2004, 11:16 PM
WadesMommy - I would love to hear what you think of tibetan book of the dead when you finish !

attackferrt - Crocodile on the Sandbank is the first Amelia book, at least try out the first one. Its a really nice feel good kinda read (were not talking heavy fiction here), perhaps you can handle the lure of a series better than I.
;)

jenzie
12-02-2004, 02:24 PM
I recently finished:

- The Grim Grotto by Lemony Snicket, the latest book in A Series of Unfortunate Events
- Copenhagen by Michael Frayn
- Flatland by Edwin A. Abbott
- Forgotten Truth by Huston Smith (just as good the second time)
- The Piano Lesson by August Wilson
- The Hipster Handbook (hysterical stuff)

And right now I'm reading:

- Loser Goes First by Dan Kennedy (laugh out loud funny!)
- You Have to Kiss a Lot of Frogs by Laurie Graff
- Mysticism by Evelyn Underhill


I :heart: books!

WadesMommy
12-02-2004, 05:46 PM
WadesMommy - I would love to hear what you think of tibetan book of the dead when you finish !


Sounds good! I just recently started it. I read a book called Life After Life and it referred to the Tibetan Book of the Dead. I had heard about it previously, so of course, I had to read it, too. So far, it's VERY interesting.

mamaquilla
12-02-2004, 06:20 PM
Yay books books books :cartwheel: :smitten:

mamaquilla
12-03-2004, 04:44 PM
Just finished Mad Cowboy...good food for thought ! next will be Being Vegan by Joanne Stepaniak and The Dance of 17 LIves (the incredible true story of Tibets 17th Karmapa) by Mick Brown. He wrote A Spiritual Tourist, very good book, makes ya think :)

Tracy G
12-04-2004, 12:15 PM
Strategic Ignorance: Why the Bush Administration Is Recklessly Destroying a Century of Environmental Progress by Carl Pope.

spasticastic
12-04-2004, 11:58 PM
- The Hipster Handbook (hysterical stuff)

I thought that book was pretty deck also. I bet it's even better for you since you're living in Seattle. Which hipster are you?

jenzie
12-05-2004, 11:37 PM
- The Hipster Handbook (hysterical stuff)


I thought that book was pretty deck also. I bet it's even better for you since you're living in Seattle. Which hipster are you?

Haha. I'm no hipster, hun. I'm so un-hip it's not even funny. :p

spasticastic
12-06-2004, 12:08 AM
Haha. I'm no hipster, hun. I'm so un-hip it's not even funny. :p
So you're basically admitting that you're fin? :D
Didn't that book teach you anything???

mamaquilla
12-06-2004, 02:57 AM
Finished Being Vegan by Joanne Stepaniak

Exstremely helpful, informative book :)

jenzie
12-06-2004, 01:44 PM
So you're basically admitting that you're fin? :D
Didn't that book teach you anything???

Totally fin; I'm so midtown. And I live in the land of deck. *hangs head in shame*

Emiloid
12-06-2004, 02:20 PM
Totally fin; I'm so midtown. And I live in the land of deck. *hangs head in shame*
Woah! Jenzie's speaking in tongues!

I'm sort of reading the Autobiography of Mother Jones. So far so good!

jenzie
12-06-2004, 02:24 PM
Woah! Jenzie's speaking in tongues!

I'm sort of reading the Autobiography of Mother Jones. So far so good!

*points at spasticastic* He started it! ;) :p

And "sort of reading"? Phsssah. I thought better of you... :laugh: :silly:

Emiloid
12-06-2004, 03:21 PM
*And "sort of reading"? Phsssah. I thought better of you... :laugh: :silly:
I'm just uncommitted at the moment. I plan to read all of it, but I'm not dragging it around with me or anything. ;) Soon I'll be on winter break and I can read alllllll day long! Except when I'm working and stuff.

jenzie
12-06-2004, 04:07 PM
I'm just uncommitted at the moment. I plan to read all of it, but I'm not dragging it around with me or anything. ;) Soon I'll be on winter break and I can read alllllll day long! Except when I'm working and stuff.

That's more like it! ;)

Vegit-8
12-06-2004, 04:22 PM
I am just finishing Tom Holt's Snow White and the Seven Samurai.
It has been a lot of fun and I am looking forward to how it is going to be all wrapped up.
Previous to that I read wonderful story written by Mark Haddon from the perspective of an autistic boy, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. It is both a funny book and a tragic one, IMO.

May peace and joy be with you.
Vegit-8

Tracy G
12-06-2004, 04:32 PM
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time is one of the best works of fiction that I've read over the past year. I'm glad you liked it, too, Vegit-8.

Tofuy
12-07-2004, 01:17 AM
i'm rereading personal favorites Noble House(james clavell) and Dune(frank herbert) because they're fun to read and make me feel all warm and joyful inside.

JasonSt
12-08-2004, 10:10 AM
I'm half-way through America (the book) by the Daily Show with John Stewart. There is some terribly funny stuff in there. Its written as a textbook. Even though I'm disgusted with the thought of politics at the moment, it is more of a comedic civics guide than a overtly political rant.

gladcow
12-08-2004, 12:19 PM
Just finished "Depression Free For Life" by Gabriel Cousens. Lots of good information.

dropscone
12-08-2004, 01:03 PM
I'm *still* reading Quicksilver by Neal Stephenson :( I have to say that some of it is going waay over my head.

I read the Da Vinci Code last weekend though - I really liked the mystery part, though I thought the characterisation was a bit weak.

Tofuy
12-08-2004, 01:15 PM
go play "The Da Vinci Code" games that are available through danbrown.net. they're fun. don't google for a walkthrough! do it yourself!

i didn't think the characterisatons were any different from normal trashy fiction novels.

mamaquilla
12-13-2004, 02:29 PM
I read Vegan The New Ethics of Eating
Im stuck in the middle of The Dance of 17th Lives, argh ! its a lot of details...
I have read thru Vegan Vittles and The Uncheesey Cookbook as well.

read read read, yay ! :happy:

lotus_blue
12-15-2004, 01:28 PM
I'm reading "Insight Meditation: The Practice of Freedom" by Joseph Goldstein. I've had the honor of sitting with Joseph Goldstein, and the man is a total genius.

gladcow
12-15-2004, 01:40 PM
Currently reading "Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim" by David Sedairis. Really good. Next I may read "Siddartha" at my husband's request.

lex_talionis
12-15-2004, 01:42 PM
Archie and Jughead Double Digest #384

kimmysoo
12-15-2004, 02:45 PM
Archie and Jughead Double Digest #384
OMG, I loved Archie and the gang as a kid! Is it just as fun reading as an adult? Are the characters still the same? That Veronica... sheesh!

I always see the comics in line at the supermarket, but have been too embarrassed to buy them for myself. :blush:

lex_talionis
12-15-2004, 02:52 PM
I was just kidding. Everyone lists all these weighty books, and while I've read some of those, the last several years I read mostly mass market stuff.

I bet Arch, et al wouldn't be as fun anymore. I read like 10 million Richey Rich comics as a kid, and then saw a big bundle of them in a box lot at an auction. I got a couple hundred for $2.00.
I read some but they weren't as good as I had remembered.

kimmysoo
12-15-2004, 02:56 PM
I was just kidding.

Oh. Now I'm really embarrassed cause I was actually serious! :confused: :blank:

I like doing stuff I used to do as a kid... sometimes it's cool, but like you said, most often it's not nearly as good as you remember.

lex_talionis
12-15-2004, 02:58 PM
Sheeesh. Don't be embarrassed (I can never spell that).

I bought the RR comics like 8 months ago.

mamaquilla
12-15-2004, 03:06 PM
Hey Gladcow, I really enjoyed "Siddartha" I hope you read it :happy:
Read Becoming Vegan by Brenda Davis, found it hard to read and a bit intimidating. I found her suggestions on dealing with people after making the transitoin to veganism very pragmatic, mature and respectful.

Still trying to finish Dance of 17 LIves :umm:

lotus_blue
12-15-2004, 03:21 PM
Ohh yes..."Siddhartha". Most definitely. Brilliant! :yes:

zatoichi
12-15-2004, 04:32 PM
i didn't really understand siddhartha. it didn't follow the buddha story very closely. was this intentional? was it supposed to be one of those 'what if' scenerios?

JasperKat
12-15-2004, 06:17 PM
Oh. Now I'm really embarrassed cause I was actually serious! :confused: :blank:

I like doing stuff I used to do as a kid... sometimes it's cool, but like you said, most often it's not nearly as good as you remember.


I have a Light Brite! And not from when I was a kid, either. I got it like 2 years ago! :happy:

-JK

mamaquilla
12-15-2004, 07:58 PM
Praise Buddha ! I finished Dance of 17 lives, pfhew ! :laugh:

walrus
12-15-2004, 09:26 PM
I just finished up "Wicked" which was really, really good.
Now I'm reading a copy of "Meat Market" courtesy of grog, and so far I'm really liking it. Although a lot of the information is stuff I've already heard, he's thrown in some things I hadn't learned yet, and also ways to correct problems too. I think it's a good read for those looking for arguments against the meat industry.

lotus_blue
12-15-2004, 10:20 PM
Originally Posted by zatoichi
i didn't really understand siddhartha. it didn't follow the buddha story very closely. was this intentional? was it supposed to be one of those 'what if' scenerios?
zatoichi, I've always taken "Siddhartha" as a fable, not necessarily the story of the Buddha. I'm sure it can be interpreted a variety of ways, but that's my understanding of the story.


Originally Posted by JasperKat
I have a Light Brite! And not from when I was a kid, either. I got it like 2 years ago!
OMG, me too, JK!!! Seriously, I have one too that I got a couple years back! That's awesome! :laugh:

Emiloid
12-16-2004, 11:32 AM
I just finished up "Wicked" which was really, really good.
Now I'm reading a copy of "Meat Market" courtesy of grog, and so far I'm really liking it. Although a lot of the information is stuff I've already heard, he's thrown in some things I hadn't learned yet, and also ways to correct problems too. I think it's a good read for those looking for arguments against the meat industry.

Yikes! I have to start reading that again! Grog gave me a copy as well, but I was busy with school-related reading. Now I have to figure out where I stashed the darn thing. :blush:

I'm still reading The Little Friend, and enjoying it a LOT. I'm reading it really slowly so that it doesn't end too quickly.

grog
12-16-2004, 11:58 AM
I'm still reading The Little Friend, and enjoying it a LOT. I'm reading it really slowly so that it doesn't end too quickly.

What is that about? Did you buy it just so you could walk around with it and bump into people and go "say hello to me and The Little Friend" In a bad white girl cuban accent?

Emiloid
12-16-2004, 05:45 PM
What is that about? Did you buy it just so you could walk around with it and bump into people and go "say hello to me and The Little Friend" In a bad white girl cuban accent?

Whaaaaa....??? :confused: You're insane. :rolleyes:

The book is about a little girl whose brother died (probably murdered) when she was a baby. She is determined to solve the mystery. There's more to it, of course, but that's the basic plot, so far at least. My sister gave it to me for my birthday, which was ages ago.

grog
12-16-2004, 06:07 PM
Whaaaaa....??? :confused: You're insane. :rolleyes:



Only on days that end in y. But I was making a Scarface allusion. "Say hello to me and my little friend....blam blam blam" I should probably see the movie before I allude to it though.

Tofuy
12-17-2004, 12:39 PM
Currently reading "Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim" by David Sedairis. Really good. Next I may read "Siddartha" at my husband's request.

THAT'S what i'll get my mom for christmas! ah HA! :D she loved "Me Talk Pretty One Day" :cool:

mamaquilla
12-21-2004, 02:08 PM
I read the 9th Amelia Peabody mystery, Seeing a Large Cat.
Sadness tho, my library seems to not have the next 3 in the series :bawling:
im thinking i know what i need for xmas. :happy:

schmeel
12-21-2004, 03:04 PM
I was just given the book The Joy of Not Working. I can't wait to read it. My career counsilor gave it to me.

walrus
12-21-2004, 08:55 PM
I'm now reading "Managing the Nonprofit Organization: Principles and Practices" by Peter F. Drucker. I'm not sure what I'll get out of it, though. Hopefully I'll learn a thing or two and be on my way.

the tanger
01-01-2005, 09:59 AM
all creatures great and small - james herriot

lotus_blue
01-01-2005, 12:53 PM
A Tale of Love and Darkness by Amos Oz.

mamaquilla
01-02-2005, 12:34 AM
I finished The Food Revolution by John Robbins - lots of great information, a little depressing overall, gotta keep a good attitude.

Bought a used version of The New Farm Cookbook, sooooooooo cool, lots of really good info, i also have their Midwifery/Birthing book, its my very favorite and love it and always tell expecting moms to read it even if they are not into hippee living loverliness!

I found the next Amelia Peabody book used, yee hawww, and a used the soy of cooking.

Reading frenzy starts now :p

ohbugs
01-02-2005, 10:22 AM
Yesterday I read the graphic novel 100% by Paul Pope. Since I'm not a seasoned reader of graphic novels, I have to stop myself from just reading it like a short story/novel (i.e. just reading the words and zipping through to find out what happens). The storyline of 100% very well done; the artwork is something of an acquired taste. None of the characters are extraneous and they're all very interesting.

clickman
01-02-2005, 01:29 PM
Eternal Treblinka: Our Treatment of Animals and the Holocaust. It's quite good, I must say.

dropscone
01-02-2005, 01:46 PM
I was just given the book The Joy of Not Working. I can't wait to read it. My career counsilor gave it to me.

I looked this up on Amazon - seems like an interesting read, think I'll see if I can get hold of it on Bookcrossing.

I'm re-reading the His Dark Materials trilogy, and am on the the final stretch of Quicksilver - it's funny, I've read a load of books with similar themes lately, Isaac Newton in particular keeps cropping up.

I wish His Dark Materials was a bit more veg friendly - all the characters keep eating liver and wearing furs. Very good read though (yes, I know it's a children's book :) )

lex_talionis
01-04-2005, 01:05 PM
_Care of the Soul_, Thomas Moore

Though i don't belive in them, I'm substituting, 'vital spark' or some such thing in my head for 'soul'.

It spoke to me kind of along the lines of _Man's Search for Meaning_ because it's not about how to fix your life. It's more realisitic and is along the lines of "How to bear your life".

I hope it's practical.

schmeel
01-12-2005, 04:54 PM
Yesterday I read the graphic novel 100% by Paul Pope. Since I'm not a seasoned reader of graphic novels, I have to stop myself from just reading it like a short story/novel (i.e. just reading the words and zipping through to find out what happens). The storyline of 100% very well done; the artwork is something of an acquired taste. None of the characters are extraneous and they're all very interesting.

100% is out as a Graphic Novel now?!!! I read the first three issues, but didn't read no's four or five! I frickin' LOVE Paul Pope! Ohmigod ohmigod ohmigod!
Oh boy! I can't breathe! I'm so excited. 100% is written in comic form, but Pope calls it a "Movie" it is so good. I love the world he's created with his comics. If anyone wants a good read, read his other books esp. Heavy Liquid.

Husky Corn Star
01-13-2005, 01:39 AM
I've just finished 'Queer' by William S. Burroughs, & have just started 'Allen Ginsberg In America' by Jane Kramer

beka
01-14-2005, 06:11 PM
im reading middlesex by jeffrey eugenides. it's weird, but good.

Tracy G
01-14-2005, 06:15 PM
I finished Legal Drug (volume 1) by CLAMP not long ago. It was my first manga, and I really liked it! I actually read it twice in a row.

Right now, I'm just reading the Feb/Mar 05 issue of Bust. I'm so glad it's now a bimonthly publication, instead of quarterly.

isnt she lovely
01-16-2005, 03:03 PM
I just finished reading Hot Water Music by Charles Bukowski....highly recommend it! FiveStars!!!!

stegan
01-17-2005, 03:28 PM
A couple of weeks ago, I finished "Join Me" by Danny Wallace, which had been handed to me at a New Year's party. Surprisingly, for a book attained in such a way, it was really very very funny and I highly recommend it.

Now, aside from my weekly perusal of The Nation , I've begun to read "Nightwood" by Djuna Barnes, a book obtained by swiping it off a friend's bookshelf. Have not gotten far enough into it to give an honest appraisal yet...

Cheers.

grog
01-17-2005, 04:06 PM
I just re-read the Chronicles of Narnia, good stuff, as I recalled.

SillyGoose
01-17-2005, 08:16 PM
I just finished The Da Vinci Code. Meh. The historical aspect was interesting (even if a lot of it is reportedly inaccurate) but overall it was pretty mediocre.

grog
01-17-2005, 08:52 PM
I just finished The Da Vinci Code. Meh. The historical aspect was interesting (even if a lot of it is reportedly inaccurate) but overall it was pretty mediocre.

Hehe, funny, I just saw a show on the History Channel that was picking it all apart. Interesting tale though, I just wish it was present directly as fiction to the unsuspecting masses.

jenbizagogo
01-17-2005, 10:35 PM
I just re-read the Chronicles of Narnia, good stuff, as I recalled.

One of my favorites! The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe will be coming to the big screen this December! I can't wait! :)

grog
01-17-2005, 10:44 PM
One of my favorites! The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe will be coming to the big screen this December! I can't wait! :)

Whaaaa? I must go google. This big copy of all the books I got also has "The Magician's Nephew" which is the prequel, creation of narnia story, which I hadn't read the first time around, so that was cool too.

ETA: FYI: narniaweb (http://www.narniaweb.com/)

jenbizagogo
01-17-2005, 11:04 PM
Whaaaa? I must go google. This big copy of all the books I got also has "The Magician's Nephew" which is the prequel, creation of narnia story, which I hadn't read the first time around, so that was cool too.

ETA: FYI: narniaweb (http://www.narniaweb.com/)

:D
This is a cool site, too:
http://www.narnia.com/

My best friend and I are having a debate regarding whether or not Disney is going to ruin this...I remain hopeful though! :)

frank_iii
01-18-2005, 10:51 AM
Wow, long thread. Depending on where I am in the house and which bathroom (too much information?), right now I'm reading:

Living and Dying in Zazen (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0834805316/qid=1106066918/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl14/103-2285108-5304655?v=glance&s=books&n=507846)

The Zen of Living and Dying (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1570621985/qid=1106066960/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/103-2285108-5304655?v=glance&s=books)

Freedom from the Known (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0060648082/qid=1106067014/sr=2-1/ref=pd_ka_b_2_1/103-2285108-5304655)

Small Stakes Hold'em (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1880685329/qid=1106067041/sr=2-1/ref=pd_ka_b_2_1/103-2285108-5304655)

:)

Emiloid
01-18-2005, 11:25 AM
Gee, frank_iii, you must live in a mansion!! :o

I'm reading... Confessions of an Economic Hit Man
(http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1576753018/qid=1106068704/sr=8-1/ref=pd_csp_1/104-2214153-6207929?v=glance&s=books&n=507846) by John Perkins. It offers a whole new take on international relations and especially US foreign policy.

Here is an article and interview with the author from Democracy Now (http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=04/11/09/1526251).

frank_iii
01-18-2005, 11:31 AM
Gee, frank_iii, you must live in a mansion!! :o

Bedroom, bathrooms, family room. Nah.

schmeel
01-18-2005, 02:18 PM
I'm reading the Neon Bible by John Kennedy Toole, the author of A Confederacy of Dunces. It was the only other novel found of his after his death. It's a serious novel, nothing like Confederacy. But it's really good.

I recently finished reading the Joy of Not Working by Ernie Zelinski. This book should be read by EVERYONE! Its subtitle is A book for the retired, unemplyoed, and overworked It defines workaholism and boredom as diseases, uses real life examples to show the danger of working too hard, and the importance of utilizing your leisure time. It also give real life examples of people who are living a smaller incomes and living full lives. The book encourages EXACTLY what everyone I know needs, less work, more life! He points out that even the rat will give up on the rat race if it's not supplying its efforts aren't providing it cheese. Our cheese is enjoyment in life. I really really really recommend this book to every-frickin-person who reads this post. It'll either reenforce what your believe and make you feel great about your feelings or it will wake you up, and most likely save you from an early grave or isolated lifestyle due to over work. Usually once I'm done with a book I'll give it to someone else to read or have. I can't part with this thing yet. It's great.

frank_iii
01-18-2005, 02:53 PM
schmeel,

Thank you for the post! I loved C of D and wasn't aware of anything else by Toole. I'll be sure to check that out. That right there makes me feel like I didn't waste this entire day surfing the web... :) Joy of Not Working also sounds very interesting. I suspect, though, that it's one of those books where the people who really need it are the ones who won't read it. :(

Kung Fu Vegan
01-18-2005, 03:26 PM
Currently I am in between two books which I fit in between all the reading I am doing for work. I am reading "When Presidents Lie" and I am reading "Safe Food". Both of which are somewhat related to my job since I work for the United States government meaning my ultimate boss is W(although we have no confirmed head for DHS right now). And of course safe food deals a little bit with bioterrorism. Personally though I feel the greater problems with the American food supply come with problems that we are not willing to correct internally versus some direct threat to some part of the chain. At least all of us here are safe from tainted meat :)

matriarco
01-26-2005, 10:15 PM
I'm reading Dominion right now and I love it! There are definitely things Matthew Scully says that I don't agree with but I think the overall effect (for lack of a better word) is amazing.

I grew up in a Christian family with Christian friends and have heard many times that God put animals here for us to use. I've responded with the obvious Bible verses but Matthew Scully presents arguments I never considered that are so good. Plus, he did so much research and the book is full of information about things I knew very little about.

Reading this book makes me feel much more prepared to hold discussions about veganism with my family, coworkers, etc. Plus, he's a speech writer so the book is beautifully written. I don't like when authors use too many unnecessary words and I love the way this guy writes.

schmeel
01-26-2005, 11:21 PM
The Neon Bible by John Kennedy Toole was unbelievably good! Wow! What a book. Just as powerful as Confederacy of Dunces is funny. I'm still in awe. This is tough, I've read two great books back to back! I don't know what to start now...maybe I'll read In the Shadow of No Towers by Art Spiegelman. Yeah that's the ticket. But Neon Bible, go read it. The dude was 16 when he wrote it! Rediculous!

skewfield
01-26-2005, 11:32 PM
i'm about to start a book manifold left here called rage and reason by michael tobias, some murder whodunnit about animal rights. we'll see.

zatoichi
01-27-2005, 05:29 PM
i've been reading (finally) Confessions of an Economic Hit Man by john perkins. i've been reading it at barnes and noble so i don't have to spend twenty-five dollars on a hardcover i'll only read once.

it really puts US empire building into perspective, and how certain world events that i've only heard mentions of fit into the scheme of things (like the panama invasion and the iranian hostage crisis)

i also started amy goodman's Exception to the Rulers, which is also a hardcover book i'm not planning on purchasing. i'm going to stop purchasing books entirely if i can help it. i just find bookstores more pleasant than libraries (or at least my library, which is large, but not very.. pleasant). amy goodman sounds like a socialist though, so i'm sure she'd understand. and john perkins has made his living from human suffering, and now he's making plenty with this book, i'm sure, so he doesn't need my money either.

Chijou_no_seiza
01-29-2005, 09:20 PM
I'm reading God's Debris A thought experiment by Scott Adams (the creator of Dilbert). It's very interesting (not funny, ok well I find some parts funny..) and I recommend it to anyone who is open to a completely different ideas about god, religion, and science. If anything about that offends you then it' is definitely not for you, however I think most people here would really enjoy it!

attackferret
01-30-2005, 10:39 AM
I'm reading The War of the Copper Kings by C.B. Glasscock (a truly unfortunate name). It's a non-fiction novel with the tagline "Greed, power, and politics: the billion-dollar battle for Butte, Montana, the richest hill on earth." I'm only two chapters in and so far there's been crazy western gangsters and potentially even more crazy vigilante justice. What more could I ask for?

bumblebee
01-30-2005, 06:27 PM
Freethinkers by Susan Jacoby.

lex_talionis
01-31-2005, 07:54 AM
_The MAchine Crusade_ and the _Secret Lives of Dogs_
The crusade is cool for Dune heads (not nearly as good as the 'real' dune books, IMO, but it's still good to go to that universe)

the secret lives sucks becuase the writer is a bitch who I'd like to punch. I bought it thinking it would have warm happy stories abt dogs. Instead she talks abt breeding her dogs, putting them on sled teams, loaning them out, letting them wander for days, etc etc etc.

Kat
01-31-2005, 11:13 AM
I just finished reading:

Player Piano by Kurt Vonnegut

Seeing Ourselves; Classic, Contemporary & Cross-Cultural Readings in Sociology compiled by John Macionis & Nijole Benokraitis

I haven't really started another novel yet, but I might re-read Farenheit 451 since I just got my own copy recently. I also bought a used psychology textbook called The World of Psychology. Is it weird that i read old psychology & sociology textbooks for fun?

stegan
02-09-2005, 06:27 PM
I just started re-reading "Seymour-an Introduction" by JD Salinger. It's two novellas in the book actually- that one and "Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenter". I was always such a huge fan of "Catcher in the Rye", I figured I should broaden my Salinger horizons.

"Seymour" is brilliant- Salinger at his most verbose and funny and obscure. This is a coarse analogy, but it's sort of like a blog- he's just foaming at the mouth with words and they all spill onto the page. Not always making sense, but still with wonderful results.

grog
02-09-2005, 07:07 PM
_The MAchine Crusade_

That must be related to the Butlerian Jihad eh? Dune rocks.

walrus
02-10-2005, 10:17 PM
"The Introvert Advantage: How to Thrive in an Extrovert World" by Marti Olsen Laney.

It's actually quite interesting. I've learned that I am in fact an Introvert, which I always knew, but I never knew how much of an Introvert I actually was. And what the real definition is. And that I shouldn't feel bad about it anymore. I'm really glad I stumbled across this at the library.

SkippyCheval
02-11-2005, 08:06 PM
Currently reading: Alice and Through the Looking-Glass (Gah something like that :p) (And just read Alice in Wonderland). I really wonder if the author was on LSD or something :p It's great!

Also reading Einstein: The special and general theory of relativity/optics (Newton) but, in Einstein's book I've gotten to a point where I feel a bit lost without the math, I understand the logic behind, but I know I'm missing something as I get confused by some passages, and those strictly around math are like chinese. But I plan on understanding this book after Cegep or at least, university : A long time from now :p.

Optics is made for everyone but I don't like how it's written, so I think I'll put it on the shelf for now..


EDIT: Skippy abuses the ':p' smiley. :D

Tracy G
02-23-2005, 04:31 PM
Paris in the Twentieth Century by Jules Verne.

Kung Fu Vegan
02-24-2005, 11:04 AM
I am currrently reading Collapse: How Societies choose to fail or succeed by Jared Diamond. I just started chapter 2 which deals with the society that existed on Easter Island at one point. The first was about modern day Montana though and it was an interesting chapter. I would reccommend this book unless you get depressed reading about the stupid thinks we do as human beings without realizing the consquences.

Emiloid
02-24-2005, 06:20 PM
I am currrently reading Collapse: How Societies choose to fail or succeed by Jared Diamond.
I LOVE that guy! I had no idea he had a new book out. :silly:

bluedawg
02-24-2005, 07:27 PM
just finished _why men don't listen and women can't read maps_

I don't know if it was any good. I'm trying to read relationship books, and have no idea which ones are good (they're damn expensive too!)
i might be able to help you with that, lex. i have some strong opinions about several relationship books. free tip o' the day: john gray (of the mars/venus franchise) is the devil.

i'm reading dominion by matthew scully right now. i hate to say this, because it makes me feel very, very stupid, but i'm struggling with it a bit. the first chapter was really boring or "too much" or something... i was having a tough time staying engaged. i really really liked the writing in the second chapter (on the safari club), but now i'm in chapter 3 and i'm kind of zoning in and out again. i wanted to love this book and instead i'm finding myself worried that i'm too stoopid to read it. i seriously can't believe i just admitted that. :umm:

spacehippy
02-24-2005, 07:49 PM
I just finished "A Wrinkle In Time" by Madeline L'Engle. Brought back memories of reading it sometime in my childhood.

attackferret
02-24-2005, 08:09 PM
bluedawg - I haven't read very much of Domninion.. I started it over winter break, and then put it down because the first chapter was so dry. Hope that makes you feel better :)

Terry
02-24-2005, 08:16 PM
Portrait of a Burger as a Young Calf.

bluedawg
02-28-2005, 09:08 PM
bluedawg - I haven't read very much of Domninion.. I started it over winter break, and then put it down because the first chapter was so dry. Hope that makes you feel better :)
why, yes! yes it does! thank you! :kiss:

for the record, i've made it into chapter 4 now, and things are a little better again.

Adams
02-28-2005, 11:25 PM
It's the Crude, Dude: War, Big Oil and the Fight for the Planet
By Linda McQuaig

http://www.randomhouse.ca/catalog/display.pperl?0385660103

:thumbsup:

shedonteatmeat
03-01-2005, 06:57 AM
I just read Confessions of an Heiress.



*hangs head in shame and runs away* :rolleyes: :p
(see, some of us read trash!)

LazyGirl
03-01-2005, 11:21 AM
I'm almost done reading The Mists of Avalon. I started it last Wednesday, and I've been killing myself staying up late at night trying to read it. I have bags under my eyes, this book is so good. I always disliked Guinevere, and now, I can't stand her.

I'm also re-reading Getting Things Done and The Girl's Guide to Power and Success. Every now and then, I like to pretend that I am ambitious and that I want to "get ahead" in my "career". :)

kimmysoo
03-01-2005, 01:29 PM
the _Secret Lives of Dogs_

the secret lives sucks becuase the writer is a bitch who I'd like to punch. I bought it thinking it would have warm happy stories abt dogs. Instead she talks abt breeding her dogs, putting them on sled teams, loaning them out, letting them wander for days, etc etc etc.

Same here! I got it several years ago without knowing what her stance was. I highly disagree with pretty much all of her theories/ideas. Complete waste of my money.

ellietex
03-01-2005, 11:14 PM
Reading for school takes up most of my time, but we've gotten into some really fun stuff. Currently reading Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. I checked out non-school books from the library for the first time the other day, but I fear they're gonna just sit by my bed if I keep being this busy. I got a book on bees, one about tea, a couple of dancer autobiographies, and a book on the history of food. I've finally admitted just how much I love non-fiction, lol.

dropscone
03-02-2005, 02:38 AM
re: Why Men Don't Listen and Women Can't Read Maps - hehe, the quiz in that book told me I'm a man. Quite severely a man at that. I didn't agree with much in there though I read it too long ago to give it the kind of slagging off I seem to remember it deserving.

JasonSt
03-09-2005, 10:49 PM
I just finished the latest from Jon Krakauer titled "Under The Banner Of Heaven." It is a non-fiction work about Ron and Dan Lafferty, two (ex-communicated) Mormon fundamentalists who kill their brother's wife and infant daughter after Dan receives a revelation from God that they must do so. The author discusses the history of the Mormon religion and how its teachings shaped the minds of the two men. A very good read. I've (twice) read "Into The Wild" by the author and am looking forward to reading his other books.

mamaquilla
03-10-2005, 12:08 AM
The Vegan Sourcebook by Joanne Stepaniak :happy:

LittleHottie
03-10-2005, 12:20 AM
I am currently reading "To Understand Buddhism ~ The Collected Works of Venerable Master Chin Kung"

seitanicvegan
03-10-2005, 02:37 AM
Working through Beowulf in Old English. Well, trying.
Finishing The Return of the King.
The Pornography of Meat by Carol J. Adams.
Intelligence in Nature: An Inquiry into Knowledge by Jeremy Narby.
Various issues of Mother Jones, In These Times, Smithsonian, and Natural History. :p

Tracy G
03-10-2005, 10:52 AM
Nobody's Perfect by Anthony Lane

Oatmeal Girl
03-10-2005, 10:53 AM
Cunt by Inga Muscio- so good.

spasticastic
03-21-2005, 11:12 PM
National Geographic Road Atlas

1980 Ford Fiesta Car Shop Manual
:p

gladcow
03-22-2005, 12:00 AM
Finding Your Own North Star by Martha Beck
and
I'm Just Here for More Food by Alton Brown (and it is sooooo good! perfect for a food geek like me!)

mamaquilla
03-22-2005, 01:16 AM
Yay Alton, soooooo love him, i have his first book, awsomeee read

lex_talionis
03-24-2005, 08:51 AM
Food of the Gods by Terence McKenna
v1.0 pdf available here (http://users.ecoisp.com/willncindy/Terence McKenna - Food of the Gods_v1.0.pdf)

Terry
03-24-2005, 12:54 PM
I have:

A book of essays on Beethoven.
Battle Cry of Freedom.
If the Buddha Dated.
Joyce's Ulysses.
Was skimming parts of a book on the poet Swinburne last night.

I'm juggling.

schmeel
03-24-2005, 02:56 PM
This evening on my 13 hour (which translated through amtrak's TIME WARP MACHINE becomes 27 hours) train ride I will be reading Charlie and The Chocolate Factory, a Roald Dahl book that slipped through my fingers as a child in preparation for the Tim Burton film coming out later this year. After that I'm gonna read Father Joe, which was a christmas gift from my Father...Leo.

stegan
04-06-2005, 09:28 AM
Catch-22 - Joseph Heller

Just started this last night- very funny book so far. Yossarian lives! :)

Mason
04-06-2005, 12:06 PM
Catch-22 - Joseph HellerWhere are the Snowdens of yesteryear?

grog
04-06-2005, 12:12 PM
Catch-22 - Joseph Heller

Just started this last night- very funny book so far. Yossarian lives! :)

Haven't read that. But I'd have to say.

Frodo Lives!

quagga
04-06-2005, 12:21 PM
For sure check out Roald Dahl's collections of short stories for adults. Wicked good.

gladcow
04-06-2005, 02:51 PM
Reefer Madness (just started)
and
The Dogs of Bedlam Farm (just finishing)

Emiloid
04-06-2005, 03:30 PM
grog, you HAVE to read Catch-22. Seriously. :blank:
BTW, There is a Snowden reference on my blog (http://daily-affirmations.blogspot.com/), for those who care.
It's in March. Sorry about the shamefully shameless plug.

Oh yeah, and I'm reading The Last Safe Place on Earth by Richard Peck, YA fiction about religious fanaticism and book-banning and stuff.

grog
04-06-2005, 03:33 PM
grog, you HAVE to read Catch-22. Seriously. :blank:


I'd read it, if I had it, but I don't have it, so I can't read it! :silly:

If you have it, let me borrow.

jenzie
04-06-2005, 03:47 PM
Reading:

The American Short Story Vol. 1
The Marrow of Tradition by Charles W. Chesnutt
Speaking With the Angel ed. by Nick Hornby
Girls Night In by all sorts of authors

Seems I'm in a bit of a compilation/short story mood these days. ;)

Emiloid
04-06-2005, 03:56 PM
I'd read it, if I had it, but I don't have it, so I can't read it! :silly:

If you have it, let me borrow.

I don't think I have it, but there's this building over on E 1st Ave that has all these books! And they let you take them home! You've been there. I know. I went there with you ;)

(If I find it I'll definitely let you borrow it!)

Mason
04-06-2005, 04:11 PM
I'd read it, if I had it, but I don't have it, so I can't read it! :silly:

If you have it, let me borrow.I could post it to you in sections but it could take a while:

one. THE TEXAN

It was love at first sight.

The first time Yossarian saw the chaplin he fell madly in love with him.

Yossarian was in the hosipital with a pain in his liver that fell just short of being jaundice. The doctors were puzzled by the fact that it wasn't quite jaundice. If it became jaundice they could treat it. If if didn't become jaundice and went away they could discharge him. But this just being short of jaundice all the time confused them....

petaske'kwe'
04-06-2005, 04:12 PM
For sure check out Roald Dahl's collections of short stories for adults. Wicked good.

I read Kiss Kiss, a collection of his short stories, a month or so and I was surprised by how different they were from the young adult stuff. Very morbid but good.

Right now I am reading and thorougly enjoying The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexander Dumas. I avoided reading it for a while because it was so thick (>600 pages!) but I love the Romantic style and it's definitely keeping my interest.

grog
04-06-2005, 04:21 PM
I just read "The Real Story" by Stephen R. Donaldson. It wasn't very good. He even has an afterword where he admits its not very good, but it sparked some ideas for the next three books in the series (which I bought all at once at the used bookstore) and they are supposed to be much better. He's the author of the acclaimed fantasy series "The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, the Unbeliever" Which do kick serious ass, which is why I bought these ones, being the same author and all.

Mason
04-06-2005, 04:39 PM
I just read "The Real Story" by Stephen R. Donaldson. It wasn't very good. He even has an afterword where he admits its not very good, but it sparked some ideas for the next three books in the series (which I bought all at once at the used bookstore) and they are supposed to be much better. He's the author of the acclaimed fantasy series "The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, the Unbeliever" Which do kick serious ass, which is why I bought these ones, being the same author and all.Yes - I went through the same process. I read "The Real Story" because of the Covenant series. I found his explanation for the story to be much more interesting than the actual story. I never got around to the next book. Let us know if the rest are worth the work of getting through the first one!

Tracy G
04-06-2005, 04:39 PM
you HAVE to read Catch-22... BTW, There is a Snowden reference on my blog (http://daily-affirmations.blogspot.com/) ...Sorry about the shamefully shameless plug.
It's alright. You're safe. The moderator for The Arts and Web Stuff forums is the same person. ;)

Catch-22. Easily one of the best books ever.

garn
04-06-2005, 05:22 PM
Yesterday I got "The Immortal Class" by Travis Culley. I just started it but it's great so far. It's a auto-biography about being a Bicycle Messenger in Chicago.

Emiloid
04-06-2005, 07:48 PM
It's a auto-biography about being a Bicycle Messenger in Chicago.Ha ha! "Auto" biography.... :p

JasonSt
04-07-2005, 01:04 PM
Yesterday I got "The Immortal Class" by Travis Culley. I just started it but it's great so far. It's a auto-biography about being a Bicycle Messenger in Chicago.

Sounds interesting; I'll have to check it out.

JasonSt
04-07-2005, 01:06 PM
Ha ha! "Auto" biography.... :p

Good grief! :rolleyes: :)

stegan
04-07-2005, 01:14 PM
Ha ha! "Auto" biography.... :p

Um, isn't the guy a bike messenger? :)

Emiloid
04-08-2005, 02:27 AM
Um, isn't the guy a bike messenger? :)Yeah, that's why I thought it was funny!

feenix101
04-08-2005, 05:41 AM
I recently started Prince of Tides.

Already its as great as everyone says and I'm only 50 pages in.

theveganmary
04-26-2005, 03:51 PM
I'm rereading Zod Wallop by William Browning Spencer. I love everything Spencer has written, and actually planned at one point to go to Austin, TX where he lives and try to meet him. He hangs out in coffee shops and such, I understand.

Synopsis: (admittedly stolen from Amazon.com because they did a good job of summing up, which I'm bad at)

"There are two versions of Harry Gainesborough's bestselling children's book Zod Wallop: the published version, written second, and the original version, stolen by Harry's zealous fan, Raymond Story, while Harry and Raymond were both patients in a mental hospital. The published version has a happy ending; the private version was Harry's confrontation with the death of his child. And the private version, emotionally true and infused with the power of a group hallucination, ending with the destruction of the world, is becoming real."

jenzie
04-26-2005, 03:57 PM
There's a thread for that here (http://www.plantbasedpeople.com/showthread.php?t=117). :)

theveganmary
04-26-2005, 04:02 PM
There's a thread for that here (http://www.plantbasedpeople.com/showthread.php?t=117). :)
Oops... thanks! ~Mary Elena (theveganmary)

Tracy G
04-26-2005, 04:10 PM
Thanks, Jenzie. :) I've merged the threads.

Currently reading: The Not So Big House by Sarah Susanka

jenzie
04-26-2005, 04:39 PM
:)

Currently reading (for school): Summer by Edith Wharton

Currently reading (for pleasure): The Joy of Not Working by Ernie J. Zelinski