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La Végétalienne
01-05-2010, 07:45 PM
But the first book is Bridge to Terabithia which (the movie) had him in tears.
I hated that book so much as a kid.

Any thoughts on Barbara Kingsolver? She was my favorite author in high school, but now I'm afraid to read her nonfiction again, 'cause I have a feeling she's in the "happy local meat" camp.

bekah-chan
01-05-2010, 08:26 PM
i've yet to read any of barbara kingsolver's books yet, but own a couple that were recomended to me. so, i'll be waiting for some opinions too :)

La Végétalienne
01-05-2010, 08:33 PM
I'm sure her fiction is fine (or at least no more offensive than anything else in terms of veganism) and her earlier nonfiction is about wildlife and ecology, so it's mostly Animal, Vegetable, Miracle that I'm conerned about, but I feel like that has the potential to be so repulsive that it taints my opinion of her other works.

bekah-chan
01-05-2010, 08:47 PM
got it :)

Miso Vegan
01-05-2010, 11:02 PM
I like her fiction, I presume I will be offended by her non-fiction, and I want to still enjoy her fiction (yet I'm not at all drawn to Lacuna), so I won't read her non-fiction.

JasperKat
01-06-2010, 05:13 AM
I finished Fart Party 2

:laugh: what?! This pretty much requires an explanation. :laugh:


I'm also in process on The Wordy Shipmates

How is it? I almost bought it in a frenzied Christmas shopping spree.

I read Word, which was sent to me my the lovely miss Miso for the holiday swap. Cute! :thumbsup: And I noticed that it's a signed copy, thanks Miso!

-JK

gladcow
01-06-2010, 12:04 PM
:laugh: what?! This pretty much requires an explanation. :laugh:

it's the second graphic novel (http://www.fartparty.org/store/) by Julia Wertz, creator of Fart Party.org. I love her books and her website and bascially everything. :p



How is it? I almost bought it in a frenzied Christmas shopping spree.


I'm loving it, but I need to be able to devote larger chunks of time than I currently have to enjoy it as much as I'd like to.

gladcow
01-06-2010, 02:55 PM
Emiloid!!! (http://content.usatoday.com/communities/popcandy/post/2010/01/cool-book-alert-1001-childrens-books-you-must-read-before-you-grow-up/1)

Emiloid
01-06-2010, 04:16 PM
Thanks, gladcow! Sadly, it's too late for me. I'm already a grown-up. :cry:

That's a great list for teachers and parents, of course. I'll definitely look it over and make sure I read the books with any future students I have.

Looking over the list (short as it is), it looks like I already have read a lot of the books--many of them when I was a child. :)

gladcow
01-06-2010, 04:20 PM
I was taking the book in the spirit of "young at heart", but I understand the whole grown up thang :p

Emiloid
01-06-2010, 04:32 PM
Growing up can be tough. Some might argue I'm not there yet....

BTW, here's a spreadsheet (http://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0AsL5YAzCgrJbdFJnYU96bkVOUUU4dHZIR1Z6QjNTM 1E&hl=en) someone made of the entire list. I've never heard of a lot of the books.

carabdle
01-11-2010, 09:53 AM
I just finished The Great Book of Amber. I don't know about the rest of you, but it REALLY irritates me when an author forgets a big plot point and refers to it differently later in the same series. I know he wrote the 10 books over a course of many years, but he apparently completely forgot that one character knew another character's true "being." In the books, there is a demon who can take over other people's bodies. In one of the earlier books (maybe book 6), one man--Luke--realizes that this body shifter was once his girlfriend--Gail. Then in book 10, the body shifter which had been Gail admits to another character that she's afraid of what Luke will do when he realizes that she used to be Gail. The character she's talking to (Merlin) starts to tell her it won't matter, that it'll be a "wonderful surprise" to Luke, even though Merlin is the guy that Luke told about the body shifter being Gail in the past! Later in the same book, the demon who used to be Gail starts to hint at the "fact" of her having been Gail and Luke says as long as whatever she's talking about (as she doesn't give details) it doesn't matter if she loves him. She says she does, but again Luke shows no signs of knowing that she used to be Gail:umm:

grog
01-11-2010, 12:49 PM
But Amber is awesome anyway right?

I just re-read the same. I didn't catch that inconsistency, I thought Luke never knew about the demon in Gail. It gets a bit twisty-turny that's for sure.

When thing that did drive me and Chijou nuts was the spelling/editing errors. They must be reprinting that thing from an old setup because the errors never get fixed.

carabdle
01-11-2010, 03:11 PM
I still enjoyed the story no doubt, but I get really irritated when authors don't keep up with their own "reality." It was either in book five or six--the one when Luke is recuperating after Merlin pulls him through the trump after Dalt almost kills him--when Luke says that the demon was Gail.

bluedawg
01-12-2010, 02:28 PM
still working my way through redemption by nathan winograd (so interesting!), but also reading the heck out of some free-first-chapter-kindle-samples. :laugh:

so far, i've read the beginnings of:
eating animals by JSF
when you are engulfed in flames, and dress your family in corduroy & denim, and me talk pretty one day by david sedaris
what the dog saw by malcolm gladwell
maybe baby (thanks, Emiloid!) by lori leibovich (ed.)
childfree and loving it by nicki defago

...decided to go ahead and actually get a copy of maybe baby, and am reading it now. very interesting stuff. i'm going to ask h-dawg to read it, too.

ganymeder
01-12-2010, 07:59 PM
On Writing by Stephen King

Emiloid
01-13-2010, 06:49 PM
I just started A Redbird Christmas by Fannie Flagg. It's very enjoyable so far. :)

La Végétalienne
01-14-2010, 01:05 PM
Wait. Isn't that for grown-ups?

Emiloid
01-19-2010, 12:07 AM
Well, yeah... I guess so. :uhoh:

BTW, I finished the book and thought it was really nice. Basically, if you want to read a happy book, this is a great choice. There is a sad part in it, but it's still uplifting and happy in general. Uh, not to give away the ending or anything....

Uh-oh, gotta find a new book to read! Maybe it will be a kids' book. ;)

vegankitty
01-19-2010, 12:34 AM
I'm reading two books- Whores and Other Feminists and Reconcilable Differences- a book about relationships.

Dugan
01-19-2010, 06:36 AM
Guy Gavriel Kay's Ysabel. I enjoyed it very much. I'll be looking for more by this author.

carabdle
01-19-2010, 01:38 PM
I just read Old Man's War. It was pretty good except for the occasional mention of eating animalsD:

ganymeder
01-20-2010, 05:58 AM
Red Book Reversed (http://chinesewhisperings.com/blog/), which I won on Twitter. It's an anthology about a bunch of people whose lives intersect, but you don't really get how at first. It unfolds as the story is told out of order from the pov of the different characters. It's really riveting.

Emiloid
01-21-2010, 08:39 PM
I started reading The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society... which I must admit is a book for grown-ups. I had never heard of it, and got it as a gift, so I had no idea what to expect. So far I think it's really interesting and informative. It's set after WWII, and includes some info about how the war effected ordinary life in the UK.

Muy bueno, so far!

eta: I was going to start a young adult novel called Wringer by Jerry Spinelli. Then I discovered it's about a kid who is being raised to become a wringer of pigeon's necks... so I decided to put it off until I felt up to reading it. The main character doesn't want to wring the birds' necks, but it still seemed pretty hard to read, and I was feeling a bit sensitive at the time. :umm:

Miso Vegan
01-21-2010, 10:05 PM
I thought Guernsey was informative, but incredibly boring.

carabdle
01-25-2010, 09:38 AM
I read the last two in the series that started with Old Man's War. They were good too and didn't include as many references to eating animals.

Dugan
01-25-2010, 11:53 AM
Just finished, in audio form, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (http://www.amazon.com/Curious-Incident-Dog-Night-Time/dp/1400032717/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1264441416&sr=1-1). It's a period of time in the life of a teenage boy who is either autistic or has Aspbergers, written in the first person. I have no idea how accurately it captures that viewpoint, but it made for a different sort of a style.

Also breezed through the very light first book in Carrie Vaughn's Kitty Norville (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_17?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=carrie+vaughn%27s+kitty+norville+series&sprefix=carrie+vaughn%27s+k) series. Kitty is a werewolf. It was a fun romp, I look forward to reading the others.

La Végétalienne
01-25-2010, 02:15 PM
But the best part of Curious Incident is the diagrams! I'm still slogging through it with my students, though I enjoyed it when I read it on my own months ago. The students don't like it because there's no action.

carabdle
01-25-2010, 02:42 PM
Also breezed through the very light first book in Carrie Vaughn's Kitty Norville (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_17?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=carrie+vaughn%27s+kitty+norville+series&sprefix=carrie+vaughn%27s+k) series. Kitty is a werewolf. It was a fun romp, I look forward to reading the others.

Wasn't that The Accidental Werewolf? I've read that and it was a quick read. I must admit that I'd already started reading Patricia Briggs' Mercedes books (about werewolves, shapechangers, etc.) and in comparison to those, I found the book rather bland and simplistic--except the almost overly described sex parts;)

VeganFromHell
01-25-2010, 02:44 PM
Got back into Mein Kampf atm.

beforewisdom
01-25-2010, 02:46 PM
I'm finishing "Self Made Man" by Norah Vincent. Her account of crossdressing as a man for a year and a half.

Dugan
01-25-2010, 07:17 PM
But the best part of Curious Incident is the diagrams!
There were diagrams?! Now I'll have to go find a print copy to flip through...


Wasn't that The Accidental Werewolf? I've read that and it was a quick read. I must admit that I'd already started reading Patricia Briggs' Mercedes books (about werewolves, shapechangers, etc.) and in comparison to those, I found the book rather bland and simplistic--except the almost overly described sex parts;)
Amazon lists the author of Accidental Werewolf as Dakota Cassidy. That's not the Kitty Norville series, though it too sounds fluffy. I've read the Briggs' books about Mercedes. Kitty Norville is similar to that.

For serious stuff, I've borrowed a variety of books about King Philip's War from the library. I'm just a small chunk away from finishing King Philip's War: The History and Legacy of America's Forgotten Conflict (http://www.amazon.com/King-Philips-War-Americas-Forgotten/dp/0881504831/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1264468268&sr=1-1). It's an especially interesting presentation because I'm familiar with many of the sites discussed. Next up in this category is Flintlock & Tomahawk which I hope to start tonight.

downwithapathy
01-26-2010, 12:49 AM
I was dating someone with Asperger's Syndrome when I read "Curious Incident." It was enjoyable but depressing. I felt soooo bad for the kid's family. My boyfriend at the time felt for the kid. How 'bout those differing perspectives?

beforewisdom
01-26-2010, 12:25 PM
I was dating someone with Asperger's Syndrome when I read "Curious Incident." It was enjoyable but depressing. I felt soooo bad for the kid's family. My boyfriend at the time felt for the kid. How 'bout those differing perspectives?

Interesting comment. I work in the IT field. I come across people who I would not be surprised having AS. Some are better than others and some I enjoy working with them, but I would not want them in my personal life.

What was it like dating someone with AS, was it the reason you ended the relationship?

carabdle
01-26-2010, 12:47 PM
Amazon lists the author of Accidental Werewolf as Dakota Cassidy. That's not the Kitty Norville series, though it too sounds fluffy. I've read the Briggs' books about Mercedes. Kitty Norville is similar to that.

Thanks for the heads-up. I might look into it:)

Emiloid
01-31-2010, 09:53 PM
I just finished The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society, and I really enjoyed it. I didn't think it was boring... though I guess in the middle I started wondering what the point was! Then it picked up again. I really liked the new (to me) perspectives and info about WWII. There's so much you never learn from history class... or at least I didn't. A personal perspective, even fictional, makes it so much more real.

One thing I thought was odd about the book is that it's a series of letters, telegrams, and diary entries written by different characters... and they tend to have a slightly different style about them, but the styles aren't that distinct. I realize that's a really hard thing to do, but it stood out to me as something that could have been made more apparent.

Aside from that, I enjoyed the book and have passed it along to a neighbor who I thought might like it, too.

Aaaaaaand, I started a new book which I borrowed from that same neighbor: Unaccustomed Earth by Jhumpa Lahiri. It's a series of short stories (not that short, though!) and so far it seems good!


I'm finishing "Self Made Man" by Norah Vincent. Her account of crossdressing as a man for a year and a half.
Oh, I read that! It came out around the time as a whole bunch of other books about people trying things out for a year. :p I definitely thought it was interesting.

ganymeder
02-03-2010, 05:41 AM
Just finished Red Book Reversed (http://chinesewhisperings.com/2010/01/red-book-reversed-released/), which was awesome. I'm not really sure I'm going to start anything new next, probably just pick up an older book to reread now as I'm sort of pressed for any free time. Or rather, when I have free time I feel like I'm too tired to concentrate on anything.

carabdle
02-03-2010, 10:21 AM
I read "Hunting Ground" by Patricia Briggs about an Omega werewolf and her mate, the second in that series. It was light reading mostly with romance and intrigue. Then I read "Two to the Fifth" by Piers Anthony, the latest Xanth book that I had. The whole book I struggled with the denied pedophilia in it. I know it's a fantasy book, but one character was "built adult" (with adult intelligence, but not experience) but had only been activated for 2 years. The character he ended up being intimate with was really only 12, but had been 17 for a little while b4 reverting to her real age of 12 and had a spell which made her "of age" each time they got intimate. The 12 year old first "seduced" the man after becoming "adult" for an hour at a time and the man kept feeling guilty about his relationship with a 12 year old (even though everyone kept telling him it was OK because she was "adult" during their intimacies):umm:

vegankitty
02-03-2010, 01:29 PM
I'm reading Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood.

grog
02-03-2010, 02:49 PM
I read many of the Xanth books starting with the first and yep, Piers Anthony is creeper.

ganymeder
02-07-2010, 09:20 PM
creeper?

I haven't read any Xanth books, but I read Anthony's The Incarnations of Immortality (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incarnations_of_Immortality)series and loved them.

Jessica?
02-07-2010, 11:54 PM
I'm reading the book Ishmael by Daniel Quinn right now
I love it!!
It has really opened my eyes to things i hadn't though too much about in the past.
here are some note I've taken VV
http://veganjessica.blogspot.com/2010/02/i-have-been-reading-book-ishmael-by.html

carabdle
02-08-2010, 09:48 AM
creeper?

I haven't read any Xanth books, but I read Anthony's The Incarnations of Immortality (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incarnations_of_Immortality)series and loved them.

Incarnations was really good. I personally like a lot of the Xanth books, but some of them do have some questionable subtexts (like the denied pedophilia I mentioned previously and definite sexism).

I just read Shades of Grey by Jasper Fforde. It was about our world in the future (maybe, it seems something else might be going on) where people can only see one or two colors and have NO night vision. It took me a while to get invested in the characters, but now I hope that the second book (I'm guessing there will be at least 3) comes out soon!

Dugan
02-08-2010, 11:49 AM
I *loved* the Fforde story telling books* - the ones that have fairy tales and literature as a real alternate world that you can jump into. I'll make a point of finding Shades of Grey.
ETA: *Aha! The Thursday Next books.

VegeTexan
02-08-2010, 11:50 AM
I read many of the Xanth books starting with the first and yep, Piers Anthony is creeper.

I really liked his book Orn in which a bird is a lead character and another human character is vegetarian.


I'm reading the book Ishmael by Daniel Quinn right now
I love it!!
It has really opened my eyes to things i hadn't though too much about in the past.
here are some note I've taken VV
http://veganjessica.blogspot.com/2010/02/i-have-been-reading-book-ishmael-by.html

Ishmael, a good read for a nice view of history and the rights of animals.

Me? I'm reading an anthology, The Dead That Walk.

I don't know when I'll lose my love of zombie fiction. I see zombies as a metaphor for meateaters. Mindless, violent, slow, selfish and filled with puss and gore.

carabdle
02-08-2010, 02:41 PM
Last time I heard, Piers Anthony is a vegetarian.

I've read all the Thursday Next and Fairy Tale Crimes stories by Jasper Fforde and enjoyed them a lot. Though I was disappointed that the Fairy Tale Crimes series was really [SPOILER ALERT] just a completely fictional place/book that Thursday Next set up to keep fairy tale characters from being "unemployed." I'd read the Fairy Tale Crimes books first and when I found that out in the Thursday Next series, I was very disappointed. I liked the idea of another universe where fairy tale characters were real and not just in a book:(

Dugan
02-09-2010, 06:36 AM
The genetically engineered Gingerbread Man...

bumblebee
02-09-2010, 06:42 AM
The Greatest Show On Earth

vegankitty
02-09-2010, 07:06 AM
I am also reading The Zombie Survival Guide on my iphone. It's by the author of World War Z. I just started it-I also need to Fledgling by Octavia Butler for my vampire book club.

bekah-chan
02-09-2010, 11:54 PM
i am about halfway done with choke by chuck palahniuk. i always love his books.
i also started reading killing yourself to live by chuck klosterman. it must be a chuck thing, he's awesome too!

vegankitty
02-11-2010, 12:42 PM
Making Intimate Connections:7 Guidelines for Great Relationships and Better Communication by Albert Ellis and Ted Crawford.

Boykitty and I have been arguing WAY too much considering we only see each other once a week. So far I like this book a lot- I am a big fan of cognitive behavioral therrapy and REBT.

bluedawg
02-12-2010, 12:31 PM
vegankitty, i haven't seen that one before, thanks!

you might also like the seven principles for making marriage work by john gottman. :yes:

Emiloid
02-13-2010, 06:55 PM
The Greatest Show On EarthIs that by Richard Dawkins? Or am I mixing it up with The God Delusion?

Anyway, I just started reading Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood.

I never continued with the book of short stories I started a while back. (Not by Atwood.) The one story I read most of was pretty good, but apparently didn't capture my attention. :p

carabdle
02-15-2010, 03:36 PM
I read Finity this weekend and it REALLY annoyed me. I love sci-fi and this was about a group trying to stop a multi-verse "shuffle"...that is, that something was causing people to jump from one universe to another anytime they used phones or other wired/wireless technology (which you had to get more than halfway through the book to learn). It was beyond disappointing and it just seemed like the author was trying to show off his scientific knowledge and "guesses." The ending was beyond unsatisfactory since they didn't stop what was going on, just figured out how to control it for their own private selves.

Then I read La Vida Vampire, a book I picked up on the bargain rack. It was a pretty quick read...a vampire romance/mystery. I'm not much of a vampire fan, but this book was OK. There's a second in the series already out and I'll probably check it out one day.

VegeTexan
02-22-2010, 12:24 PM
I just finished World War Z, an Oral History of the Zombie War (http://www.amazon.com/World-War-Oral-History-Zombie/dp/0307346609), and I have to agree with the 655 Amazon user reviews that give it a top rating.

It's a collection of interviews with the survivors and the fighters, told with intellegence, pathos and some humor.

Great book in the genre.

After all the zombie books I have read, I have begun to realize that it is only a question of time before GE (genetic engineering) lives up to the Owellian-speak slogan of GE (General Electric)---
GE, We Bring Good Things to Life

Damn, I need to start stockpiling some crap.

carabdle
02-22-2010, 03:23 PM
I just read Welcome to the World, Baby Girl. It was funny and sad...another good Fanny Flagg book IMO.

La Végétalienne
02-26-2010, 12:50 PM
There's a reference to my hometown in that book!

ganymeder
02-28-2010, 11:03 AM
I just finished reading 'Doctor Who: Human Nature' as a free ebook from Aldiko (for my Android phone).

Currently reading 'The Book of Dragons' by E. Nesbit (same format) as a bedtime story for MIni.

**VeganTexan:

You should try reading 'Pride and Prejudice and Zombies' if you're fond of the genre. It's completely awesome.

Dugan
02-28-2010, 12:22 PM
You should try reading 'Pride and Prejudice and Zombies' if you're fond of the genre. It's completely awesome.
I just read a review of Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter by the same author. Sounded worth a try.

TressaLou
02-28-2010, 10:18 PM
I just finished The Education of Little Tree - the story of a little native american boy raised by his grandparents after his mom passed away. An interesting look into the culture's way of thinking, also very sad at times, but an all-around good book.

KaliMama
02-28-2010, 10:48 PM
:umm: A little background on Asa Earl Carter:

The Transformation of a Klansman (http://www.nytimes.com/1991/10/04/opinion/the-transformation-of-a-klansman.html?sec=&spon=&pagewanted=print)

Going Native: Why do writers pretend to be Indians? (http://www.slate.com/id/2185856)

TressaLou
03-01-2010, 09:01 AM
Interesting. It was given to me as a gift, and I thought it was sweet. Apparently the person who gave it to me didn't know about the author's history...

VegeTexan
03-01-2010, 11:49 AM
**VeganTexan:

You should try reading 'Pride and Prejudice and Zombies' if you're fond of the genre. It's completely awesome.

Me, fond of the genre?
Thanks for the suggestion, gany.


I just read a review of Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter by the same author. Sounded worth a try.

Sounds worth a try to me, too,
as soon as I finish what I'm reading now...
a 700 page anthology called Zombies, Encounters with the Hungry Dead.
5652

nauthiz
03-03-2010, 10:43 PM
The Name of the Rose

It's awesome. Pretentious and overwrought enough to keep you on your toes, but not quite so unreadable as Finnegan's Wake.

JasperKat
03-08-2010, 08:30 AM
Just started The New Work of Dogs and I'm liking it. Jon Katz theorizes that we create neurotic dogs by using them as substitutes for human relationships. A friend that's always there for you, a buddy that's never too busy to cuddle, someone who accepts you just as you are and doesn't demand a lot in return. It's an interesting theory, and I want to see where he goes with it. I certainly see people who treat their dogs like humans and ignore or suppress the dog's natural needs.

-JK

carabdle
03-08-2010, 03:30 PM
I think in some ways dogs are better than humans, but I agree that some people don't allow their dogs to really be dogs.

ganymeder
03-08-2010, 04:59 PM
Just finished Doctor Who: Sands of Time (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sands_of_Time_%28Doctor_Who%29) but I'm thinking of rereading it again to figure out the clues I missed the first time. :)

VegeTexan
03-08-2010, 07:44 PM
Cluck, Murder Most Fowl (http://www.amazon.com/Cluck-Murder-Eric-D-Knapp/dp/1419682644/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1268098405&sr=1-3)

Sometimes chickens come back for revenge.
They liked you when it was only your farmer boots signaling that the food bucket was coming....

Now that they are dead, they see you for what you really are....
and they want to even the score.

Holy Crap, stuck in the zombie genre was bad enough, now I'm doing poultrygeist.

ganymeder
03-09-2010, 09:15 AM
omg, that looks freakin' awesome.

Dugan
03-09-2010, 10:16 AM
poultrygeist
BWAH!

VegeTexan
03-09-2010, 12:54 PM
Here, pass this around. (sip sip)

JasperKat
03-10-2010, 06:20 AM
Holy Crap, stuck in the zombie genre was bad enough, now I'm doing poultrygeist.

For your viewing pleasure: http://www.poultrygeistmovie.com/

-JK
ETA: ooo, free screening (http://www.poultrygeistmovie.com/news/2009/06/03/10pm-free-screening-of-poultrygeist-at-voodoo-doughnut-in-portland/)! :silly:

Dugan
03-10-2010, 06:25 AM
I just started Ken Follett's Pillars of the Earth, which I'd've never known existed if not for playing the board game (http://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/24480/the-pillars-of-the-earth).

KaliMama
03-12-2010, 01:13 AM
Finally finished Chronic City (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronic_City) (which I kept mistakenly referring to as Chronic Town :highfives REM fans:) This book took me forever to read, though that may have been mostly due to schoolwork & health problems. It was my least fave Lethem book.

Just picked up The Little Book of Hindu Deities: From the Goddess of Wealth to the Sacred Cow (http://www.amazon.com/Little-Book-Hindu-Deities-Goddess/dp/0452287758/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1268377221&sr=8-1). It is fun and accessible, and not at all lame. I'm going to give it a quick read, and then send it to my daughter. :) Good, basic, funny-ish intro for the curious but not too serious.

And Inside of a Dog: What Dogs See, Smell, and Know (http://www.amazon.com/Inside-Dog-What-Dogs-Smell/dp/1416583408/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1268377687&sr=1-1), though I don't expect to get very far until spring break, which is NOT SOON ENOUGH.

:blank: I'm not stressed.

KaliMama
03-18-2010, 02:55 PM
^ I am in love with Inside of a Dog.

Also reading: Light on Life: The Yoga Journey to Wholeness, Inner Peace, and Ultimate Freedom (http://www.powells.com/biblio/2-9781594862489-1)

grog
03-18-2010, 06:26 PM
I just started Ken Follett's Pillars of the Earth, which I'd've never known existed if not for playing the board game (http://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/24480/the-pillars-of-the-earth).

that's was a good book. how bizarre it has a game and that you've played it.

Emiloid
03-20-2010, 03:36 PM
I finally finished Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood. Overall I enjoyed it, though there were some irritating parts... like a slow beginning/middle, and a little too much emphasis on futuristic product/corporation names. Also, there's a vegan character (very small role) who is pretty ridiculous and seems to exist only as a way to take cheap shots at veganism. Oddly enough, based on the overall theme of the book, I would think that Atwood would be sympathetic to veganism... but it seems like her understanding of it is not very clear or deep. Anyway, the story really picked up at the end, just when I was starting to wonder what the point was. So it ended on an interesting note. I sort of want to read After the Flood, which I believe is set in the same fictional world. I'm not interested enough to buy it new or online, but if I come across a copy, I'll read it. How's that for a rousing endorsement? :p

BTW, I must say that Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale is one of my all-time favorite books, so maybe this one just didn't live up to my expectations? Oryx and Crake was very good in some ways, but it didn't pack the punch that The Handmaid's Tale did for me.

quagga
03-20-2010, 03:54 PM
I read After the Flood and enjoyed it very much. Veganism is a major thread of the book, but in a religious/cultish way. There were some excellent passages that embody the essence of veganism and nature for me.

It seems to me that she respects ethical veganism, but finds it impractical for most -- because most people are not ethical.

Emiloid
03-20-2010, 04:32 PM
Thanks for that, quagga. I'm back to being more interested in the book after hearing your take on it. I heard an interview with Atwood on the radio a while back that started me on this path in the first place. She and a musician friend of hers even had hymns that they (or he?) had made up to accompany the book. I thought it sounded really intriguing.

KaliMama
03-21-2010, 01:27 AM
Started Wally Lamb's The Hour I First Believed last night, and it is so wonderful. :heart:

Krrez
03-21-2010, 09:06 PM
I just finished Thomas Moore's Care of the Soul. Meh.

Also Three Cups of Tea about Greg Mortenson. I recommend this book so hard I do not have the proper adjectives to describe how much I recommend it. Go read it. Greg Mortenson is doing more to stop terrorism and promote peace and quality of life than pretty much anybody ever. He builds schools for girls in Pakistan. His work is truly incredible. I totally forgive him for not being vegan. :p

So now I am reading Plato's Republic and Hero With a Thousand Faces by Joseph Campbell. I've got a couple other books wandering about with bookmarks in them, but those two are library books and need to be finished.

Oh, and Gould's Full House is awesome if you like having your entire conception of how the world works turned upside down. :thumbsup:

carabdle
03-23-2010, 01:08 PM
I just read The Automatic Detective. It was pretty good, though I found it a bit distracting that the author never fully described the appearance of the main (robot) character. I do know that he was red and metal, he didn't have a nose and not "really" a mouth, but it was distracting trying to picture him w/o a thorough description:confused:

Emiloid
04-12-2010, 09:37 PM
I just finished reading Unmarried to Each Other by Dorian Solot and Marshall Miller, a book about being unmarried... mostly in the US. I thought it was very useful and interesting. It was great to read about other people's experiences and reasons, and it's a great resource for legal issues and activism about living together unmarried partners.

The book was written by the couple who started The Alternatives to Marriage Project (http://www.unmarried.org/), and since I ordered it from their website, the copy I got was signed by the authors. Somehow I wasn't expecting that, so it was a neat surprise. :)

I also started reading Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim by David Sedaris. It's laugh-out-loud funny, but not at all superficially so. There are some slightly depressing stories... but they're still really funny. I :heart: it very much.

SInce I'm practically unemployed , I'm on a reading-spree. Coming up next: Dr Neal Barnard's Program for Reversing Diebetes, The Year of the Flood by Margaret Atwood, Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows by Dr Melanie Joy, and Mycelium Running by Paul Stamets (about mushrooms). I'm also reading The Daily Five, which is a book about teaching literacy. I also have another Sedaris book to read: When You Are Engulfed in Flames. :thumbsup:

La Végétalienne
04-13-2010, 05:35 AM
I just finished Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim and Me Talk Pretty One Day. Can anyone figure out what the title or the cover picture (http://www.sawdustmemoriesonline.com/Images%20-%20books/2007%2001%2001%20dress%20your%20family.jpg) of the former has to do with the stories?

vegankitty
04-13-2010, 09:07 AM
I'm reading The Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett. It was a childhood favorite. I even got the same edition I had growing up with illustrations by Tasha Tudor.

Next up is my vampire book club book: The Strain by Chuck Hogan and Guillermo del Toro.

Miso Vegan
04-13-2010, 11:16 AM
I loved The Little Princess when I was young, too.

La Veg: nothing! I wondered the same thing myself.

gladcow
04-13-2010, 04:20 PM
Re: Sedaris: I've never found his jacket pictures to be indicative of what is inside.

I'm reading The History of Love and it's wonderful

Emiloid
04-16-2010, 03:07 PM
I just finished Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim and Me Talk Pretty One Day. Can anyone figure out what the title or the cover picture (http://www.sawdustmemoriesonline.com/Images%20-%20books/2007%2001%2001%20dress%20your%20family.jpg) of the former has to do with the stories?

I was wondering that, too. I think he mentions corduroy and/or denim in that one story about panhandling... but other than that, I have no idea!

VegeTexan
04-18-2010, 09:25 PM
I just finished Becoming Raw by Brenda Davis and Vesanta Melina.
Their earlier book, Becoming Vegan, has always been my favorite reference book for veganism. Brenda is past president of the Vegetarian Group of the American Dietitic Association and will be a guest on my radio show next month.

They shoot down some myths about the benefits of a raw diet, but the book still makes you want to eat more raw. It's filled with charts that show the vitamins and minerals in a variety of food, both cooked and raw, which they use to illustrate the benefits and concerns of going raw.

IMO, the definitive book on the raw vegan diet.

.

gladcow
04-23-2010, 12:15 PM
I heard from a little bird that book was forthcoming :silly:

Glad it's out now :yes:

ganymeder
04-25-2010, 04:09 PM
The Breath of Life and Other Stories (http://tinyurl.com/ye9zb6k)
by Eric J. Krause

bluedawg
04-27-2010, 07:28 PM
still working my way through redemption by nathan winograd (so interesting!), but also reading the heck out of some free-first-chapter-kindle-samples. :laugh:

so far, i've read the beginnings of:
eating animals by JSF
when you are engulfed in flames, and dress your family in corduroy & denim, and me talk pretty one day by david sedaris
what the dog saw by malcolm gladwell
maybe baby (thanks, Emiloid!) by lori leibovich (ed.)
childfree and loving it by nicki defago

...so, over spring break, on vacation, i read five books! five! it was awesome. several of them are on the above list. :silly:

redemption by nathan winograd - i absolutely loved this book. totally want to give it to the director of our humane society. i think we're following a lot of the no kill guidelines, but not aaaall of them, and i'd like to nudge.

maybe baby by lori leibovich (ed.) - unfortunately, this book did not clear up any of my own feelings about having a family or not, but it was an interesting read anyway.

dress your family in corduroy & denim, and me talk pretty one day by david sedaris - hilarious and entertaining, totally want to read more of his stuff.

extremely loud and incredibly close by jonathan safran foer - really enjoyed this one; reading from oskar's perspective was poignant and funny and sweet.

Ariann
04-27-2010, 08:16 PM
We just finished Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close! We cried a LOT. I thought a fair amount of the weird page layout and colored stuff was kind of gimmicky and didn't add much, though.

Dugan
04-28-2010, 06:20 AM
RnR just finished that one as an audio book. He liked it a lot. I put in a request at the library, now I'm curious to see the printed book.

gladcow
04-28-2010, 01:09 PM
History of Love, that I mentioned above is by Foer's wife. It was excellent. Now I'm trying to figure out what to read next. I picked up The Believer Advice book, but it's not a sit down and read kind of thing, you know? Also in contention are American Wife, We Thought You Would Be Prettier, and some stuff in mah drawer at home :silly:

squirrel
05-03-2010, 11:41 AM
I read a book in grade school that I am trying hard to remember the name of. I think it was about little tiny people that lived among plants outside, and they got dug up and taken and put in a jar by some school kids and almost died when they fertilized them or watered them and I think they may have been chased by a bug or something.......I know it sounds strange, but I wondered if by any small chance, someone here may have read a book like that? I know it's from the 80's. It's not Honey I Shrunk the Kids, either. LOL

matriarco
05-03-2010, 11:52 AM
What to Eat by Marion Nestle. Anyone else read it?

KaliMama
05-03-2010, 06:46 PM
squirrel~ The Littles? The Borrowers?

VegeTexan
05-03-2010, 10:18 PM
I've been out of town, without a computer, visiting my parents.
So I read a lot last week,
Bite Me, by Christopher Moore, third in a series of funny vampire novels. Good read. (thanks for introducing me to Moore in the first place, Gladcow)
Another zombie anthology, The New Dead
The House of Thunder, an old book by Dean Koontz

Now I am in the middle of It's Superman, a great read set in the late 1930s (when Superman first appeared). The characters are well written and the era is nicely established. Good book.

OrangeYouSweet
05-04-2010, 06:38 AM
I'm currently reading Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer. So far I think it's a great book, full of great info.

La Végétalienne
05-04-2010, 06:57 AM
squirrel~ The Littles? The Borrowers?
I was thinking of those! I think they mostly stayed inside, though.

squirrel
05-04-2010, 07:43 AM
KM, thanks...those look like cute books, but this one was definitely about little people who lived outside until they were captured and put in a jar. I think it was children that gathered them and put them in a jar as a classroom project. Thanks for looking, though!! :)

gladcow
05-04-2010, 12:01 PM
squirrel - you should email Sars at Tomato Nation. She often has her awesome reader army find books just like that, with the power of their minds (and the interent)! :silly:

http://tomatonation.com/

(check out The Vine, that's where she answers reader questions)

veganpossum
05-04-2010, 12:41 PM
I just finished 'The Kind Diet' by Alicia Silverstone. I enjoyed it but I am not into her whole 'Superhero' aspect. I come from a Mediterrean background so tomatoes, garlic, pastas, crusty breads are part of my background and are still my food preferences, though now with my pretty out of control insulin resistance, I no longer eat pasta, potatoes, rice and have limited fruit somewhat, at least for now, trying to get it in control. So her push towards macrobiotics did not interest me in the least. Not into seaweed, beans every day, grains 3x a day, etc.

I am wondering what the community feels about her stance on sushi ? She mentions meat, sugar, fish and dairy throughout the book as ' nasty foods ', but admitted on occasion when she goes out with her friends for sushi, she pops a piece of into her mouth off her friends plate.

Any thoughts ??

Vickie :silly:

KaliMama
05-04-2010, 02:28 PM
Let us know when you find out, squirrel. It sounds like it might be a good intro to the subject of AR for the kiddos!

squirrel
05-04-2010, 02:49 PM
Thanks, gladcow! :) Ok, I emailed her. I'll let you know if she replies..or do I look at the vine to see if it gets answered?

gladcow
05-04-2010, 03:04 PM
I'm not sure, I've not emailed her a question. But, I think she emails you.

squirrel
05-04-2010, 03:15 PM
I'll be watching. Meanwhile, I've tried typing in any key words I can think of to try to find it, but nothing's working. Who knows, maybe I dreamed it. :laugh:

gladcow
05-04-2010, 03:17 PM
once upon a time, I thought I dreamed Milky Way by The Church (true story!)

vegankitty
05-04-2010, 03:23 PM
It sounds familiar squirrel. My first thought was The Littles. I loved that and The Borrowers as a kid. Did it come out in the 80s or that's when you read it?

I just bought the new Sookie Stackhouse. I don't usually buy hardcovers but it was 40% off with my Barnes and Noble card. I already started it and so far so good.

squirrel
05-04-2010, 03:26 PM
I read it in the 80's for sure, but it could have come out earlier.

Does anyone remember The Boxcar Children (http://www.amazon.com/Boxcar-Children-No/dp/0807508527)?

Or, The Wolves of Willoughby Chase (http://www.amazon.com/Wolves-Willoughby-Chase-Chronicles/dp/0440496039/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1273004942&sr=1-1)?

Or, The Last of the Really Great Whangdoodles (http://www.amazon.com/Last-Really-Great-Whangdoodles/dp/0060218053/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1273004999&sr=1-1)?

Or, any of the Moomintroll (http://www.amazon.com/Finn-Family-Moomintroll-Moomintrolls-Jansson/dp/0374350310/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1273005062&sr=1-1) books?


LOL I'm on an 80's kick. I'm being nostalgic today.

vegankitty
05-04-2010, 03:39 PM
I have the first Moomintroll book! I remember the Wolves of Willoughby Chase!

I just ordered Harriet the Spy to reread. I love kids books. They remind me of happy sick days in bed reading and eating toast.

squirrel
05-04-2010, 03:43 PM
I loved all the Moomintroll books. You should check the rest out!

bekah-chan
05-04-2010, 04:47 PM
boxcar children! i was really into those as a kid. i was super excited when i found a box set at a garage sale once :p

La Végétalienne
05-04-2010, 05:28 PM
I liked the BC books too, but it was annoying that the later authors never bothered to write in chronological order!

Miso Vegan
05-04-2010, 11:25 PM
I just finished 'The Kind Diet' by Alicia Silverstone. I enjoyed it but I am not into her whole 'Superhero' aspect. I come from a Mediterrean background so tomatoes, garlic, pastas, crusty breads are part of my background and are still my food preferences, though now with my pretty out of control insulin resistance, I no longer eat pasta, potatoes, rice and have limited fruit somewhat, at least for now, trying to get it in control. So her push towards macrobiotics did not interest me in the least. Not into seaweed, beans every day, grains 3x a day, etc.

I am wondering what the community feels about her stance on sushi ? She mentions meat, sugar, fish and dairy throughout the book as ' nasty foods ', but admitted on occasion when she goes out with her friends for sushi, she pops a piece of into her mouth off her friends plate.

Any thoughts ??

Vickie :silly:

I haven't read it, but I sure won't now! :laugh: Srsly, I hate when vegan authors admit to transgressions. I don't know if they admit to them so they seem more "human," but all it does is give omni's a way to call vegans hypocrites or poseurs.

ganymeder
05-05-2010, 10:10 AM
I just finished 'The Kind Diet' by Alicia Silverstone.---

I am wondering what the community feels about her stance on sushi ? She mentions meat, sugar, fish and dairy throughout the book as ' nasty foods ', but admitted on occasion when she goes out with her friends for sushi, she pops a piece of into her mouth off her friends plate.

Any thoughts ??

My thoughts are that its awful. It undermines her whole vegan stance. It shows she still views fish/animals as food. Either that, or that she acknowledges their ability to suffer, sentience, whatever and willingly chooses to ignore it because its 'once in awhile.' I don't rob banks, so once in awhile if I steal a candybar that's not so bad-right?

I know this sounds harsh, but it's hypocritical. (I'm assuming you mean fish sushi, not vegan sushi, and that she's vegan for ethical/humane reasons) Of course, if she's simply following a vegan diet for her health, then there's no hypocrisy involved, but I got the impression she was pro-AR.

Sorry to be a downer, but you asked.

On the book front, still reading the same ebook since I have had almost no time to read for myself. Reading to Minimeder though we've worked our way through 'Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of Nimh' and 'The White Mountains.'

Dugan
05-05-2010, 11:20 AM
'The White Mountains.'
as in the White Mountains of NH? Must find!

Emiloid
05-09-2010, 06:49 PM
I'm so sad. I'm just about to finish David Sedaris' When You Are Engulfed In Flames. *sniffle* It's not a sad book... I'll just be unhappy when there's no more of it to read.

On the other hand, I'm about to start In The Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson by Betty Bao Lord. It's about a young girl who moves to Brooklyn from China (I don't know which city). I'm looking forward to reading it. It almost makes up for finishing the Sedaris book.

Dark Link
05-09-2010, 06:57 PM
I love David Sedaris. Right now, I'm reading "For the Prevention of Cruelty" by Diane L. Beers.

gladcow
05-10-2010, 11:48 AM
I'm reading My Antonia by Willa Cather. My friend who hails from Nebraska picked it up for me at the used bookstore. I'm really enjoying it.

bekah-chan
05-10-2010, 01:38 PM
I'm reading My Antonia by Willa Cather. My friend who hails from Nebraska picked it up for me at the used bookstore. I'm really enjoying it.

i've been meaning to read that one! i got it after i read o pioneers!, i really enjoyed that book. willa cather is awesome :thumbsup:

gladcow
05-10-2010, 01:51 PM
I can pass it on to you when I'm done :heart:

bekah-chan
05-10-2010, 02:37 PM
aw, thanks! but i actually have a copy of it, i just need to finish a million other books first :p

gladcow
05-10-2010, 02:46 PM
Ha! I understand that :laugh:

quagga
05-10-2010, 03:48 PM
as in the White Mountains of NH? Must find!

Since I know that Gany is a science fiction fan, I'll bet a doughnut that she means The White Mountains (http://www.amazon.com/White-Mountains-Tripods-John-Christopher/dp/0020427115) from the Tripod series.

shananigans
05-10-2010, 09:15 PM
Does anyone remember The Boxcar Children (http://www.amazon.com/Boxcar-Children-No/dp/0807508527)?

I read The Boxcar Children! My grandmother gave them too me. I remember rather liking the books, but also seem to remember thinking the characters' notion of gender roles were out-dated. :p


Or, any of the Moomintroll (http://www.amazon.com/Finn-Family-Moomintroll-Moomintrolls-Jansson/dp/0374350310/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1273005062&sr=1-1) books?

:laugh: I've never seen Muumit in English, it seems so odd. I guess I never realized anyone read the books/watched the TV show outside of Finland. My host family had a little girl that really liked the TV show. They even took me with them to visit Muumimaailma (http://www.muumimaailma.fi/suomeksi). It's no Disney, but a fun time anyway. :)

squirrel
05-10-2010, 10:27 PM
I've never seen the show, but I loved the books. :)

vegankitty
05-13-2010, 10:52 AM
When I reread The Little Princess I was kind of horrified at the way Indians were portrayed.

Continuing my rereading of old favorites- I'm reading Harriet the Spy.

carabdle
05-13-2010, 11:17 AM
I just read The Organ Grinders. I thought it was pretty funny and well researched, but one part did annoy me. There is a scene where the two main characters go to a vegetarian meeting. The woman points out that they left off some vegetarians in a mural, mentioning Hitler and Mussolini. Now I don't know if Mussolini was veggie, but I KNOW Hitler wasn't. He often ate blood sausages and, even in the book, the woman mentions that he "occasionally ate pig's knuckles" though she discounts that by pointing out how much he loved veggies more:rolleyes: Then in the meeting it is mentioned numerous times how "weakly" the people spoke or acted because of their "lack of protein":mad: The author also went into the argument that vegetarians aren't really reducing animal cruelty because all the insects that are killed in driving a car and plant harvesting:rolleyes: I know the whole book was poking fun at lots of different groups, but I (probably for obvious reasons) thought that his humor directed at vegetarians seemed ridiculous--not even based in reality--whereas the other "picking" had at least some research behind it. I'm tempted to write the author, but I get the feeling he'd think I'm one of those "holier-than-thou" (his words in the book) veg*ns.

KaliMama
05-14-2010, 01:00 PM
Starting For The Win (http://craphound.com/ftw/), another YA novel by Cory Doctorow. (Who will be in Seattle this evening. And at Powell's in Portlandish on Saturday.) I highly recommend Little Brother for everyone, YAs and up.

Great article about Doctorow and his books in The Stranger (http://www.thestranger.com/seattle/living-in-a-sci-fi-novel/Content?oid=4039430).

gladcow
05-14-2010, 01:10 PM
My Antonia is really frakking depressing. :(

I need to get my eyes into that Jewish Mystics book Shiva got me :yes:

KaliMama
05-14-2010, 01:16 PM
I need to get my eyes into that Jewish Mystics book Shiva got me :yes:

I told you he had a crush on you.

gladcow
05-14-2010, 01:22 PM
:laugh: he's in mah filosofees faffin around

Emiloid
05-15-2010, 03:09 PM
Did I mention I read Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows? It was really interesting and well-written. I'd definitely recommend it to anyone who is interested in the cultural reasons behind using vs loving animals.

Also, I finished Dr Neal Barnard's Program for Reversing Diebetes. I want to send it to my mom, but I'm afraid it will seem like vegan propaganda and/or too hard a plan to follow. I think it might be difficult for her to implement a diet like the one in the book simply because of living situation. :umm:

So, next on my reading list: The Year of the Flood by Margaret Atwood. :)

VegeTexan
05-16-2010, 09:06 AM
Did I mention I read Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows? It was really interesting and well-written. I'd definitely recommend it to anyone who is interested in the cultural reasons behind using vs loving animals.



One of my favorite books, too, Em.
Dr. Joy is planning a sequel which is more action oriented (how to get other people to make the connection).
I'm trying to get the author to be our guest speaker in November at our vegetarian society's thanksgiving dinner.

KaliMama
05-16-2010, 05:01 PM
Excerpt of Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows (http://www.thescavenger.net/animals/why-we-love-dogs-eat-pigs-and-wear-cows-85734.html) at The Scavenger.

KaliMama
05-16-2010, 05:03 PM
Also: Excerpt of Sistah Vegan (http://www.thescavenger.net/animals/veganism-connection-to-antiracistsocial-justicework48676.html) at The Scavenger

KaliMama
05-17-2010, 04:58 PM
25% off everything at AK Press for the entire month of May (http://www.akpress.org/). :)

ganymeder
05-17-2010, 05:41 PM
Since I know that Gany is a science fiction fan, I'll bet a doughnut that she means The White Mountains (http://www.amazon.com/White-Mountains-Tripods-John-Christopher/dp/0020427115) from the Tripod series.

YUP. We read 'Door in the Wall (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Door_in_the_Wall)' and 'Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mrs._Frisby_and_the_Rats_of_NIMH)' together for his school, and now working our way through 'City of Gold and Lead (http://www.google.com/url?q=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Tripods%23The_City_of_Gold_and_Lead_.281968.29&usg=AFQjCNFYwGp-J1srP1tiPOpckIRYZ4E7IA&ei=o8XxS-q5Maa0MLmatd8P&sa=X&oi=section_link&resnum=1&ct=legacy&ved=0CCMQygQ).'

Shamefully, haven't read any of my own books in weeks, even though have new books sitting right next to my bedside. :(

gladcow
05-18-2010, 11:13 AM
finished My Antonia. it got less depressing and was enjoyable apart from all the animal use in pioneer times :umm:

Now I'm reading Cunt

bekah-chan
05-18-2010, 03:27 PM
Now I'm reading Cunt

:smitten:

Kat
05-18-2010, 04:02 PM
My reading list;

Basic & Applied Concepts of Immunohematology
Clinical Hematology & Fundamentals of Hemostasis
The Fundamentals of Clinical Chemistry

Sigh....just three more weeks...

Emiloid
05-20-2010, 10:44 PM
Sounds fascinating, Kat... :drool: Kind of like what I'm reading: The Daily Five: Fostering Literacy Independence in the Elementary Grades. It's great! If you're into that sort of thing....

I'm also reading The Year of The Flood by Margaret Atwood (a companion book to Oryx and Crake, which I read a while back). I'm also also reading Female Chauvanist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture by Ariel Levy. It's really interesting!

JasperKat
05-21-2010, 09:21 AM
Bones Would Rain from the Sky is my current bedtime reading. It's really thought-provoking but it also makes me feel like an inadequate dog guardian. :umm:

-JK

KaliMama
05-21-2010, 01:30 PM
I'm also reading The Year of The Flood by Margaret Atwood

Let me know when you're done, so we can talk about the ending.


Female Chauvanist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture by Ariel Levy. It's really interesting!

I need to read that one.


Bones Would Rain from the Sky is my current bedtime reading. It's really thought-provoking but it also makes me feel like an inadequate dog guardian. :umm:

And that one.

So far, For the Win (Cory Doctorow) is not as engaging as Little Brother. I really want to like it, because it's about labor organizing and activism, but it's just not doing it for me. Probably because I'm not a gamer. :umm: It's kind of a chore at times.

vegankitty
05-24-2010, 11:22 AM
I loved Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH.

I am reading the Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley. My mom loved it but I've never read it- I watch Merlin on BBC and want to read nontraditiinal Arthurian literature now.

gladcow
05-24-2010, 11:40 AM
finishing up Cunt and starting American Wife

Emiloid
05-24-2010, 12:08 PM
I started reading Flow: The Cultural History of Menstruation. It's quite entertaining. The ads are especially funny (and apalling) at times.

Still reading The Year of the Flood... and I've peeked into two other books: The Bully, the Bullied, and the Bystander and Odd Girl Out. Both are nonfiction books about bullying among young people.

matriarco
05-24-2010, 03:37 PM
I am reading the Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley. My mom loved it but I've never read it- I watch Merlin on BBC and want to read nontraditiinal Arthurian literature now.

I read this a few months ago. I enjoyed it but wanted someone to talk about it with after I finished it. There are some scenes that seem fairly homophobic (not quite the right word) that seemed out of place with the rest of the book. I wanted to know if I was missing something/interpreting them strangely.

Dark Link
05-24-2010, 08:01 PM
Recently I've been accused of being something of a caveman when it comes to feminism. So in the hopes of turning over a new leaf, I'm reading Simone de Beauvoir's "Second Sex."

La Végétalienne
05-25-2010, 03:55 AM
Ack! Read this first (http://www.jstor.org/pss/3175942)!!! And then the whole article if you can get your hands on it. If you can't here's a summary (http://www.feministmormonhousewives.org/?p=3019).

bluedawg
05-25-2010, 11:11 AM
we got iPads a few weeks ago, so i've been downloading samples of books again :) and also some awesome free books (the 'classics'). the one i'm reading right now is the mayor of casterbridge... which i read in high school, but i don't remember anything about it, except that i liked it. so i'm re-reading it on my iPad for free. woo!

vegankitty
05-25-2010, 11:35 AM
I am jealous of the ipad.

I have put aside my other book to read The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest-it just came out today and I preordered it on my iPhone kindle app. So excited to read it!

squirrel
05-28-2010, 08:06 AM
omigosh!


Your letter appears in today's edition of The Vine. This entitles you to a gift: TN magnets, TN stickers, or a GBC CD.

Please let me know 1) your real name, 2) which loot you'd like, and 3) where to send said loot.

Thanks for writing,
Sarah

:silly:



Which gift should I choose? :silly:

vegankitty
05-28-2010, 09:32 AM
Ack! Read this first (http://www.jstor.org/pss/3175942)!!! And then the whole article if you can get your hands on it. If you can't here's a summary (http://www.feministmormonhousewives.org/?p=3019).

I would love to read that whole article. I have The Second Sex but haven't read it yet-I didn't know the translation was so flawed. I wish my French was good enough to read it in the original language. Or that someone would do a better translation.

gladcow
05-28-2010, 11:18 AM
GBC CD!!!!! and give it to me! :heart: :silly:

squirrel
05-28-2010, 11:26 AM
Sounds like a plan! :)

gladcow
05-28-2010, 11:37 AM
zomg, ur famous! :silly:

*runs to the vine*

squirrel
05-28-2010, 11:40 AM
*giggling*

She edited out all my "lols" and smiley faces, though. hahaha

Makes me wish I'd worked harder to make the letter more professional-sounding. :laugh:

gladcow
05-28-2010, 12:22 PM
:laugh: she's an editor, so I'm guessing that's a bit like breathing for her ;)

very very exicted, I've been refreshing. I hope you get an answer! :D

squirrel
05-28-2010, 12:30 PM
:laugh: she's an editor, so I'm guessing that's a bit like breathing for her ;)

very very exicted, I've been refreshing. I hope you get an answer! :D

Me, too! I'll bring you the CD when I see you in August! :silly:

JasperKat
05-28-2010, 12:41 PM
Still reading The Year of the Flood... and I've peeked into two other books: The Bully, the Bullied, and the Bystander and Odd Girl Out. Both are nonfiction books about bullying among young people.

I read Odd Girl Out a year or so ago and really liked it. Let me know if The Bully...is good, I like those kind of books :)

-JK

La Végétalienne
05-28-2010, 02:01 PM
I would love to read that whole article. I have The Second Sex but haven't read it yet-I didn't know the translation was so flawed. I wish my French was good enough to read it in the original language. Or that someone would do a better translation.

I have a PDF copy of the article, so if you (or anyone else) wants to read it, shoot me a pm with your email address. That's legal, right? I haven't read either the original or the translation because I don't speak Philosopher well enough. I encountered the article in a translation course I took in college. The author's last name is Moi, so at first when the prof referred to "the article by Moi" I thought that she was beating around the bush about having us read something she'd written herself. :laugh:

Speaking of translation, I have no idea what you're talking about squirrel, but congrats!

KaliMama
05-28-2010, 02:21 PM
omigosh!

:blush: I don't know what The Vine...or TN...or GBC...are. But...yay squirrel! (right?)

vegankitty
05-28-2010, 10:02 PM
Yeah, me neither but yay Squirrel!

ganymeder
05-28-2010, 10:46 PM
Yay for squirrel!!! :cartwheel:

KaliMama
05-28-2010, 10:53 PM
Ha! I found it (http://tomatonation.com/vine/the-vine-may-28-2010/). :) (squirrel's thing)

squirrel
05-28-2010, 11:23 PM
:kiss:

KaliMama
05-28-2010, 11:34 PM
The Littles Go To School (http://www.amazon.com/Littles-Go-School-John-Peterson/dp/0590421298/ref=pd_sim_b_18)? (Have we ruled out The Littles (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Littles)?)

squirrel
05-29-2010, 05:53 AM
Yes, unfortunately. :( Thank you, though! :heart:

gladcow
05-30-2010, 07:49 PM
I keep trying to finish Cunt, and I keep coming upon passages that remind me of people (in the most random & coincidental way) and so I have to put it down and absorb.

vegankitty
05-31-2010, 11:02 AM
I want to read that one. I've read mixed reviews though.

I am starting The Stress of Her Regard for my vampire book club. Anyone who has read good nonseries vampire books, let me know! I have to find more. I have the next one figured out but beyond that-?

VegeTexan
05-31-2010, 02:41 PM
Anyone who has read good nonseries vampire books, let me know!

Ok, I guess this is the first of a trilogy, so it's a series, but it's still great...
and it's very funny.
Bloodsucking Fiends: a Love Story (http://www.amazon.com/Bloodsucking-Fiends-Story-Christopher-Moore/dp/1416558497/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1275334442&sr=1-3) by Christopher Moore.
The book was followed by You Suck and Bite Me.

Just thought you might like a bit of comic relief in your group.

vegankitty
05-31-2010, 03:19 PM
I love those books! Thanks VT. Humor is good. And a trilogy is okay- a lot of these series go on and on.

I also downloaded some free horror books from amazon onto my iPhone kindle.

ganymeder
05-31-2010, 05:55 PM
Been reading so much flash fiction and blogs that haven't had a chance to sit down and read an actual BOOK (other than bedtime stories) for awhile. But I just happen to be listening to Christopher Moore's 'Fool (http://www.chrismoore.com/fool.html)' on audiobook. It's quite a profane and bawdy retelling of King Lear - not kid friendly at all! But I am enjoying it (when Monsterbat is not around, of course!)

KaliMama
05-31-2010, 06:05 PM
I keep trying to finish Cunt, and I keep coming upon passages that remind me of people (in the most random & coincidental way) and so I have to put it down and absorb.

If you ever finish it, can I borrow? :)

bekah-chan
06-01-2010, 12:40 AM
If you ever finish it, can I borrow? :)

i actually have a copy too if you want to start it now :yes:

KaliMama
06-01-2010, 10:53 AM
Thank you! You know where to find me...next time you come up?

Now reading Female Chauvinist Pigs, courtesy of another awesome VRFer. :heart:

~loves sharing books~

gladcow
06-01-2010, 11:40 AM
I would let you borrow, but it's not mine. I'm reading it now because I've had it for 3 years now and it's time to give it back :p

bekah-chan
06-01-2010, 12:13 PM
Thank you! You know where to find me...next time you come up?

Now reading Female Chauvinist Pigs, courtesy of another awesome VRFer. :heart:

~loves sharing books~

will do :yes:

ditto on the :heart: book sharing :heart:

ganymeder
06-02-2010, 09:56 AM
Just bought Boneshaker (http://www.sfsignal.com/archives/2009/09/review-boneshaker-by-cherie-priest/)- a steampunk novel with vamps and zombies. I mean, what's not to love?

vegankitty
06-02-2010, 10:30 AM
Ooh- I want to read that!

Emiloid
06-07-2010, 06:41 PM
I finished The Year of the Flood by Margaret Atwood. I'm really glad I read it, too. So, KaliMama... you said you wanted to hear my thoughts about the ending? I'm not really sure what I think, but here are some of my rambling impressions, questions, and thoughts:

I'm not sure what to make of so many of the main characters miraculously surviving the outbreak. Are they supposed to be truly blessed in some way? Was it the hand of God, or is it just that they lived so differently that they were more likely to survive? With so many of them surviving, it makes it seem like there are lots of other survivors, and that the Flood wasn't nearly as devastating as Crake had hoped. Is that good or bad? Ditto for the ending of Oryx and Crake when the Children of Crake are beginning to take on more human qualities (like magical thinking)--was that intended to be as disturbing to the reader as it was to me? On the other hand, is that just inevitable, like the pigs who might be developing human-like sensibilities in The Year of the Flood?

At the very end, who are the singing people who are approaching? Is it the other God's Gardeners, who were singing in the last chapter by Adam One? Or is it Crake's creations...? Or some other group? Are they menacing or will they be helpful?

I thought it was strange that the ending of The Year of the Flood was so sudden, when the last part of the book was paradoxically a little too "neat" with all the loose ends being so nicely resolved. Then suddenly... it just stopped. It seemed interesting... weird... annoying... and appropriate!

What do you think, KM? Anyone else who has read this book and/or Oryx and Crake (quagga!!!), please feel free to chime in!

quagga
06-07-2010, 06:48 PM
I want to read Oryx and Crake...maybe this summer...

callmenuveena
06-08-2010, 07:06 AM
I'm reading Lonely Planet's Discover Japan (for review) and Perchance to Dream (Théâtre Illuminata Book II) by Lisa Mantchev (for pleasure).

bluedawg
06-08-2010, 04:08 PM
i finished the mayor of casterbridge on my little iBooks dealie, and i liked it the second time too. :silly: except for the last two paragraphs or so, which (i thought) were stupid.

anyhow, i also downloaded other free 'classics' that i liked in high school (namely, the scarlet letter and as you like it), but i think i might switch to a book i just paid for... why we love dogs, eat pigs, and wear cows by melanie joy. i keep hearing about it everywhere, and i read the free sample chapter and really liked it, so i paid the moolah and downloaded it for reals. :)

vegankitty
06-09-2010, 12:33 PM
I got a new phone- a sprint evo with android OS. I downloaded a reader because there is no kindle app yet. It has a lot of free books available including some by Cory Doctorow. I still have my iPhone and I downloadedsome free books on that too.

Emiloid
06-09-2010, 12:51 PM
I think I figured something out about the very end of The Year of the Flood:

The people approaching can't be Children of Crake because what they're doing is described as "singing" rather than the unearthly/crystaline sound that the Children of Crake produce. So... I think it might be the God's Gardeners, or maybe another similar group approaching. I still don't know who it is, but at least I think I know who it isn't!

And quagga, I'd definitely recommend Oryx and Crake. I want to go back and read it again now that I've read The Year of the Flood. The two books really fill each other out, in my opinion. :)

Now I have a personal dilemma: I had planned on donating The Year of the Flood to the local library, since they have Oryx and Crake already (and that's how I read it). I thought it would be nice for other people to be able to read both. However, now I'm tempted to buy and keep Oryx and Crake instead! I think I'll just have to get over my covetous tendencies.

bekah-chan
06-09-2010, 10:52 PM
i just ordered why we love dogs, eat pigs, and wear cows. i started reading it on my lunch break at work today and i didn't want to put it down! it's really interesting :yes:

Dugan
06-10-2010, 06:20 AM
Emiloid, that's what I thought too. I was surprised by some of the sexist dialogue in After the Flood. I'm wondering how much was Atwood's own opinion or if she included it as commentary on the society that'd developed.

Emiloid
06-10-2010, 12:38 PM
That is interesting. I guess I assume that things like that are either character-based or part of the society she's imagining. I assume that because it seems like a lot of her stories are pro-women, so I doubt she has distain for women in general, but I could be wrong. The only Atwood novels I've read are The Handmaid's Tale, Oryx and Crake, and The Year of the Flood, so I don't have a whole lot to go on.

Dugan
06-10-2010, 03:33 PM
Interestingly, I didn't notice it when reading After the Flood. It was while listening to part of it with RnR that we both noticed.

Dark Link
06-10-2010, 08:30 PM
"Beyond Chutzpah" by Norman Finklestein
"Animals as Persons" by Gary Francione
"The Broker" by John Grisham

ahimsa.chakraone
06-11-2010, 03:40 AM
MEAT MARKET by Erick Marcus
VALIS by Philip K. Dick

recently read ISHMAEL by Daniel Quinn <-- highly recommended!

KaliMama
06-11-2010, 11:02 AM
Very interesting discussion re: the end of The Year of the Flood....

...but really, I was just irritated that everyone was eating meat again. But Atwood's done that before (had veg*n characters revert to carnism.)

Have all you Atwood fans seen the hockey video? :laugh: :heart: You don't deke Margaret.

Finished Cory Doctorow's For the Win. I enjoyed it more as it progressed, but it's definitely more of a truly young adult book than Little Brother, which read well for adults also.

Dugan
06-11-2010, 12:11 PM
Should we start an After the Flood/Oryx discussion thread?

Emiloid
06-11-2010, 12:16 PM
I'll do it if anyone else is interested. Which I guess means KM and maybe quagga, if she's not worried about reading Oryx and Crake spoilers!

ganymeder
06-15-2010, 10:29 AM
Gave up on audiobook of Christopher Moore's Fool (retelling of King Lear). I don't consider myself a prude, but after awhile its no longer a book so much as one long dirty joke. Ugh.

About to start, Boneshaker (http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=boneshaker&oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&cid=7334363054501966549&ei=GJwXTL2kCM2inAfsxIW5Cg&sa=X&oi=product_catalog_result&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0CCQQ8wIwAg#).

Dark Link
06-16-2010, 07:38 AM
I'm trying to read through Judith Butler's "Gender Trouble" but it's about thirty miles over my head. Pretty sure you'd need a PHD in psychology and philosophy to decipher a few of her denser sentences. But perhaps it's just me.

Anyway, has she written anything more accessible that I should know about? I'd like to continue my feminist education and I've heard she's a must read.

EDIT. Here's a fairly typical one of her sentences: "Women are said to 'be' the Phallus in the sense that they maintain the power to reflect or represent the "reality" of the self-grounding postures of the masculine subject, a power which, if withdrawn, would break up the foundational illusions of the masculine subject position."

Miso Vegan
06-16-2010, 10:35 AM
As a feminist with a women's studies major, I've managed to never read her. :p what a ridiculous way to write that sentence!

Dark Link, forgive me if you mentioned it upthread, but what have you read so far? And are you interested in coming it at it from a historical, philosophical, or practical level?

Emiloid
06-16-2010, 11:21 AM
I'm still reading The Bully, the Bullied, and the Bystander. I put it down for a while because, although it's very well-written and obviously an excellent approach, it was making me feel anxious and overwhelmed. I know it will get better once I get to the "solutions" section, but it's hard to actually pick it up.

I need a fun book as an antidote. That really would make it easier! :p

eta: I'll try to think of some good feminist books. That sentence is atrocious! It also takes me back to my college days....

Dark Link
06-16-2010, 08:49 PM
Basically, I was justly accused of being a patriarchal prat and so I'm trying to change my ways. All I've really read so far is The Second Sex, which I enjoyed. I've got bell hooks in my Amazon shopping cart.

Ariann
06-16-2010, 09:20 PM
Missed the "Oryx and Crake"/"Year of the Flood" discussion. I've read O&C a few times, but not YotF. I've read a lot of Atwood and I wouldn't say that she exclusively comes across as pro-woman. I'd say she often comes across as a gender essentialist in her non-dystopic non-futuristic novels.

La Végétalienne
06-17-2010, 02:18 AM
Dark Link, did you see this (http://www.plantbasedpeople.com/showthread.php?p=424038&postcount=2652)?

Dark Link
06-17-2010, 09:00 AM
Dark Link, did you see this (http://www.plantbasedpeople.com/showthread.php?p=424038&postcount=2652)?

By the time I read your post I was already about halfway through the book and didn't want to start all over again. Perhaps I should have. Can a rough translation really make that MUCH of difference?

I feel like I got the major takeaway: "One is not born a woman, one becomes one."

Edit: Having read the synopsis of the link you provide, I ask: is there only one translation of the Second Sex? If so, there's not much I could have done, besides taking the text with a grain of salt, is there? I can't read French.

La Végétalienne
06-17-2010, 09:15 AM
There is only one published translation [cue KM to get on the copywrong soapbox]. Other than seeking out an "unofficial" translation (I don't know that one exists, though I bet there's one lurking online somewhere) or learning French, no, there isn't much that you can do, other than take it with a huge, whopping grain of salt. That and finding other sources that explain what she was actually saying.

And yes, yes, yes, a zillion million times yes, can translation make that MUCH of a difference.
Exhibit A
http://www.engrish.com//wp-content/uploads/2009/10/get-baboosh-off.jpg

Dark Link
06-17-2010, 09:35 AM
There is only one published translation [cue KM to get on the copywrong soapbox]. Other than seeking out an "unofficial" translation (I don't know that one exists, though I bet there's one lurking online somewhere) or learning French, no, there isn't much that you can do, other than take it with a huge, whopping grain of salt. That and finding other sources that explain what she was actually saying.

And yes, yes, yes, a zillion million times yes, can translation make that MUCH of a difference.
Exhibit A
http://www.engrish.com//wp-content/uploads/2009/10/get-baboosh-off.jpg

Haha! Fair enough!

KaliMama
06-17-2010, 03:43 PM
[cue KM to get on the copywrong soapbox].

:brood: :heart: :laugh:

Okay. I'll bite.

wikiwikiwiki sez:

Many commentators have pointed out that the 1953 English translation of The Second Sex by H.M. Parshley, frequently reissued, is poor. [4] The delicate vocabulary of philosophical concepts is frequently mistranslated, and great swaths of the text have been excised.[5] The English publication rights to the book are owned by Alfred A. Knopf, Inc and although the publishers have been made aware of the problems with the English text, they have long insisted that there was really no need for a new translation,[4] even though Simone de Beauvoir herself explicitly requested one in a 1985 interview: "I would like very much for another translation of The Second Sex to be done, one that is much more faithful, more complete and more faithful."[6] The publishers gave in to those requests, and commissioned a new translation to Constance Borde and Sheila Malovany-Chevalier.[7] The result, published in November 2009, has met with generally positive reviews from literary critics, who credit Borde and Malovany-Chevalier with having diligently restored the sections of the text missing from the Parshley edition, as well as correcting many of its mistakes. [8] [9] [10] [11] It is worth noting, however, that Toril Moi, one of the most vociferous critics of the original 1953 translation, is similarly critical of the new edition, voicing many concerns with its philosophical and syntactic integrity.[12]

Hmm.

Politics and Culture (http://www.politicsandculture.org/) sez:


The political remedy to this problem would appear to be obvious: if there was only to be one English translation, it ought to be an excellent translation, especially in light of the much-criticized status of the old one. [3] Failing to pursue the best possible translation should be considered as a repetition of the initial marginalization of Beauvoir’s text in English. This continues to misrepresent and delegitimize Beauvoir’s work, and contributes in turn to the undermining of other women’s philosophical contributions in the public sphere. Yet the flaws in the Parshley translation, pointed out repeatedly by feminist scholars over more than three decades, were not addressed with any seriousness by Knopf/Vintage until the publishing house announced a new translation to be completed for 2009. [4] In light of the questions that Moi introduces around the ‘public place’ of intellectual women, we would not be amiss in including the reception of the new translation in the personal genealogy of Beauvoir’s intellectual legacy. Unfortunately, one of the most obvious conclusions is that not much has changed. Moi’s recent review of the new translation of The Second Sex in The London Review of Books gives a comprehensive survey of the 2009 edition in relation not only to the original French, but also to the critiques that were pointed out by feminist scholars since the early part of the 1980s. She expresses her relief that previously-abridged sections have been restored, but unequivocally states her disappointment in the translation overall: “the obsessive literalism and countless errors make it no more reliable, and far less readable than Parshley” (Moi, 2009). In 2009, we echo the question that has been asked since Margaret Simons raised in 1983: why would such an influential feminist text be treated so dismissively?


Knopf/Vintage owns the exclusive rights to publish The Second Sex in English; their copyright does not expire until 2056, 70 years after Beauvoir’s death. Until then, no other publisher may produce an English translation of the work (Moi 2002: 107).
Source (http://www.politicsandculture.org/2010/05/24/simone-de-beauvoir-the-making-of-an-intellectual-woman/). Emphasis mine.

U.S. copyright law is insanely prohibitive. That is all.

KaliMama
06-17-2010, 03:48 PM
Beauvoir: “En refusant des attributs féminins, on n’acquiert pas des attributs virils; même la travestie ne réussit pas à faire d’elle-même un homme: c’est une travestie.” (DS, 2:601)

Literal translation: “One does not acquire virile attributes by rejecting female [feminine] attributes; even a transvestite doesn’t manage to turn herself into a man…she remains a transvestite.”

Knopf: “One does not acquire virile attributes by rejecting feminine attributes; even the transvestite fails to make a man of herself…she is a travesty.” (SS, 682″“83)


Beauvoir: “La légende qui prétend que les Sabines ravies ont opposé à leurs ravisseurs une stérilité obstinée, raconte ausssi qu’en les frappant de lanières de cuir les hommes ont eu magiquement raison de leur résistance.” (DS, 1:20)9

Literal translation: “The legend that claims that the ravished Sabine women opposed their ravishers with stubborn sterility, also tells us that the men magically overcame their resistance by beating them with leather straps.”

Knopf: “In the legend of the Sabine women, the latter soon abandoned their plan of remaining sterile to punish their ravishers.” (SS, xxvi)

Source (http://www.amptoons.com/blog/archives/2005/12/20/a-bit-more-on-the-second-sex/), with apologies for character encoding issues.

ejmess
06-17-2010, 03:50 PM
just started reading two new books. "the god delusion" by richard dawkins and "the virtue of selfishness" by ayn rand.

bluedawg
06-17-2010, 04:20 PM
this whole second sex business is very interesting indeed. :yes:

i'm still reading the carnism book (really liking it!) and i even found a [very good, totally on-topic] reason to quote from it directly in my class today. i was also happy to see that some of my students did the slow, thoughtful nod when i was through. :happy:

i also downloaded the sample chapters of two books today: the girl with the dragon tattoo (it was only a matter of time, with people talking about it all over the place) and something called never let me go, which looks very mysterious.

La Végétalienne
06-17-2010, 04:40 PM
with apologies for character encoding issues.
She just can't get a break anywhere, can she?

I just finished A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius and despite the fact that the author disses both peanut butter and Lake Michigan, I think I liked it.

gladcow
06-17-2010, 04:43 PM
it's so not hip anymore, but I :heart: Eggers. They Shall Know Our Velocity was fantastic. In fact, I may re-read it.

shananigans
06-18-2010, 12:13 AM
I haven't read Blink, but it's on my list. Freakonomics was really, really interesting though. I can't help but think I would have liked it more if Levitt (the economist) had written it by himself instead of with the newspaper guy.

I'm about 1/3 of the way through Freakonomics and really enjoying it. It does have a "newspapery" writing style but I don't find it off putting. I thought Fast Food Nation also read like it was written by a journalist, but that's probably because it was. :p

JasperKat
06-18-2010, 05:07 PM
it's so not hip anymore, but I :heart: Eggers. They Shall Know Our Velocity was fantastic. In fact, I may re-read it.

Oh yes! I love Eggers so much! TSKOV was so touching. He wrote my very favorite (http://hotgiraffe.msk.ru/books/Eggers-River.htm) short story ever, which I've mentioned a million times on VRF but will link again anyway :silly:

-JK

KaliMama
06-18-2010, 10:04 PM
That link isn't working for me. Is it the story the made me cry? The one about the running dogs?

La Végétalienne
06-19-2010, 04:30 AM
I don't know if it's the one that made you cry, but it is about running dogs.

JasperKat
06-19-2010, 08:47 AM
That link isn't working for me. Is it the story the made me cry? The one about the running dogs?

It makes me cry every.darn.time I read it, so probably yes :)

The title is After I Was Thrown in the River and Before I Drowned if anyone else is having problems with my link and would like to read it

Mr K and I are going camping this week (leaving today!) and went to the bookstore last night to stock up. I bought the new Eggers (Zeitoun), When you are Engulfed in Flames by Sedaris, a biography of Charles Schulz and a book of short stories by Stephen King. It's gonna be a ready week! :p

-JK

KaliMama
06-19-2010, 04:19 PM
It works for me now. :cry:

Dark Link
06-24-2010, 07:03 AM
I'm reading "Feminism is For Everybody" by bell hooks. I have to say, I'm not that impressed so far. The book, which admittedly is an introductory text, is filled with sweeping, un-sourced statements. There are no footnotes or endnotes.

Furthermore, even though I agree with her criticism, her use of the mouthful of a term "white-supremacist-capitalist-patriarchy" every other sentence makes me giggle.

Dark Link
06-26-2010, 10:55 AM
Could anyone answer a few of my questions about Judith Butler?

Is she saying that everyone, deep down, has the potential for bisexuality, in which case there is no fixed homosexuality or heterosexuality?

Does she advocate the dismantling of the incest taboo? I got to a section where it certainly appeared that's what she was suggesting.

Does Butler have anything more accessible I might read in the future?

Ariann
06-26-2010, 08:56 PM
Could anyone answer a few of my questions about Judith Butler?

Is she saying that everyone, deep down, has the potential for bisexuality, in which case there is no fixed homosexuality or heterosexuality?

Well, that seems to be a fairly well-established scientific understanding. I would find it shocking if she DIDN'T say that, considering her understanding of the mutability of gender/sexuality.


Does she advocate the dismantling of the incest taboo? I got to a section where it certainly appeared that's what she was suggesting.

I can't remember reading her saying that, but wouldn't be surprised.


Does Butler have anything more accessible I might read in the future?

This might be useful, for its editorial comments:
http://www.amazon.com/Judith-Butler-Reader-Sara-Salih/dp/0631225943/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1277603584&sr=8-8

Ariann
06-26-2010, 08:59 PM
"white-supremacist-capitalist-patriarchy"

How about the megatheocorporatocracy? (http://blog.iblamethepatriarchy.com)

Dark Link
06-26-2010, 09:00 PM
Thanks Arian. But what scientific sources are you using for the claim that everyone is secretly bisexual? The Kinsey reports? That the claim is "well established" is news to me.

matriarco
06-26-2010, 09:06 PM
something called never let me go, which looks very mysterious.

So good! I loved that book but didn't like Remains of the Day or When We Were Orphans (same author) nearly as much.

Kat
06-26-2010, 10:09 PM
Mort by Terry Pratchett. Hilarious :)

Ariann
06-26-2010, 11:29 PM
Thanks Ariann. But what scientific sources are you using for the claim that everyone is secretly bisexual? The Kinsey reports? That the claim is "well established" is news to me.

"Secretly" is kind of an odd term to use here. My claim is that most people are not 100% homosexual or heterosexual in the sense that most people have had some (or a lot of) conscious attraction to both members of the same sex/gender and another sex/gender throughout their lifetimes - more than the idea that people are attracted to "both" genders is the idea that people can be turned on by all kinds of stuff that doesn't fit into neat categories - people are omnisexual more than bisexual. Kinsey certainly did a lot of ground-breaking work, but it's an idea that has been expouded on by other researchers since (Klein and Coleman are two other big names in the field you may be familiar with). The Kinsey Institute is a good place to look for bibliographies of more recent scientific papers on the issue.

The addition that feminist theory adds to the picture is that our gender is not immutable and that gender and sexuality develop in a specific cultural context and could therefore have developed differently from the same biological building blocks. I believe this is more likely where Judith Butler is coming from.

bluedawg
06-26-2010, 11:38 PM
So good! I loved that book but didn't like Remains of the Day or When We Were Orphans (same author) nearly as much.
ooh, good to know! i just picked it up from the library yesterday and i'm really enjoying it so far.


Mort by Terry Pratchett. Hilarious :)
:heart: terry pratchett

JasperKat
06-27-2010, 02:28 PM
Mr K and I are going camping this week (leaving today!) and went to the bookstore last night to stock up. I bought the new Eggers (Zeitoun), When you are Engulfed in Flames by Sedaris, a biography of Charles Schulz and a book of short stories by Stephen King. It's gonna be a ready week! :p

I finished the Eggers (thumbs up!) the Sedaris (liked it, although I've read or heard some of the stories before), and the King (meh. I think old Steve is running out of steam), but the biography was kind of boring so I put down and picked up (and finished on the drive home!) All Creatures Great and Small by James Herriot. I liked it quite a bit and intend to look for the other books he's written.

-JK

tin can
06-27-2010, 02:40 PM
and the King (meh. I think old Steve is running out of steam)

I thought that happened about 10 years ago! :p


All Creatures Great and Small by James Herriot. I liked it quite a bit and intend to look for the other books he's written.

I loved those books as a kid. :)

JasperKat
06-27-2010, 03:10 PM
I thought that happened about 10 years ago! :p

The last few full length novels were so-so, but his short stories have always been my favorite. The last collection (Everything's Eventual) had some duds, but also some winners. This one... :no: there's maybe one I'd bother rereading. Disappointing.


I loved those books as a kid. :)

:silly:

-JK

squirrel
06-28-2010, 02:14 PM
I think I've read almost all of James Herriot's books, and I also loved them. As a kid, and now. :)
Aside from that whole farm thing. :(

Dark Link
06-30-2010, 07:38 AM
I thought that happened about 10 years ago! :p

I thought that happened about twenty years ago!

KaliMama
07-02-2010, 12:51 PM
I'm about to start Stieg Larsson's Millenium Trilogy. I'm hoping that it lives up to this:

It's all very confusing if you come to the story a bit after the event, which, like many, I have. Not being a thriller fan, I spurned the Dragon Tattoo bandwagon for a long time. When a book is as hyped as this, you have certain preconceptions: I imagined cliches and extreme violence. I was pleasantly surprised, then, to discover it is neither formulaic nor disturbingly graphic. And it was indeed Larsson's take on feminism that made it stand out as an original read.

The book promotes a very Scandinavian sort of equality. The message I took from it was that gender is irrelevant. We behave the way we do because of our individual characters and personal histories. In Larsson's world, it's the psychopaths who split the world along gender lines. And, boy, do they get their comeuppance.

Source (http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/booksblog/2010/mar/15/girl-with-the-dragon-tattoo).

gladcow
07-06-2010, 01:05 PM
I'm reading Bad Mother by Ayelet Waldman. I :heart: her so much it hurts sometimes.

rawshark
07-08-2010, 10:17 PM
I am currently reading Food Politics by Marion Nestle. I bought it ages ago and never got around to starting it (I buy too many books!) and was just recently going through my recipe/food related books to see if there was anything I might take to the thrift store and discovered it again!

Emiloid
07-08-2010, 11:43 PM
Oh, I read that! It was really interesting to find out how much control the animal industries (and sugary/junk food industries) have over what the government says... and even how it says what it says. I hope you like the book. :)

spjessop
07-10-2010, 09:36 AM
I am trying to read Anna Karenina but I am dreadful at making the time to read.

Emiloid
07-10-2010, 05:10 PM
^ That's an amazing book, once you get into it.

Wow, all I've said lately is, "I read that, too!" Guess I'm sort of in between books at the moment, so I don't have my own to talk about. I need to start a good fun book so I can finish reading the less fun ones I started a while back....

bluedawg
07-14-2010, 07:11 PM
I'm about to start Stieg Larsson's Millenium Trilogy. I'm hoping that it lives up to this:


heh, i saw this on twitter today and i lafted:


Things Twitter taught me: Anyone reading "The Girl Who" books is some kind of masochist attempting to get an honorary doctorate in patience.

KaliMama
07-14-2010, 07:42 PM
Ha! I thought it had a slow start, but I'm really enjoying it. Have the twitterer send my honorary doctorate to the secret drop box. ;)

nibbler
07-14-2010, 08:55 PM
I'm reading a book on vegetarian sport nutrition. So far it's been very interesting.

Ariann
07-15-2010, 11:00 AM
Just finished Little Bee. It was really great except for a few annoying things. Someone on the train told me she thought it was so amazing she hasn't been able to read anything since, but I can't give it such high praise.

Now I'm reading Tears of the Giraffe which is as delightful as the No.1 Ladies Detective Agency. Really good train reading.

KaliMama
07-15-2010, 03:00 PM
Someone on the train told me she thought it was so amazing she hasn't been able to read anything since...

I hope that I never read a book that good! :p

KaliMama
07-15-2010, 03:44 PM
I finally finished Female Chauvinist Pigs! (Thank you again, Em! :kiss:)

It's such a well-written narrative that it's easy to read in big chunks, or even in one sitting, as many do. I chose not to, because I was feeling overloaded with imagery and commentary about cultural phenomena from which I am normally pretty isolated. I started this book with only the vaguest idea what Girls Gone Wild actually was, and really no clue who Paris Hilton is/was. And honestly, the whole first chapter, with its detailed descriptions of these and other train wrecks of so-called post-feminism had me doubting that I could or would finish the book. I did not enjoy immersing myself in these worlds, but I kept on, because I knew that there would be no point in reading an analysis of something that I understood only vaguely.

When Levy moves on to her analysis, she really shines. Female Chauvinist Pigs is not an academic book, but it is not a shallow or reactionary diatribe against what she calls "raunch culture," either. Her explorations, as she describes them, are thorough and open-minded. She comes across as compassionate, thoughtful, concerned, and troubled about the enormous trends toward hollow, artificial expressions of women as sexual beings and women's active and enthusiastic participation in perpetuating these trends.

I read this book as a mother of a daughter. And I plan to send it on to that daughter, and hope that it helps her to understand the confusing and conflicting images and signals that surround her, and all of us.

downwithapathy
07-15-2010, 03:58 PM
I read "Female Chauvinist Pigs" as a college senior, intensely aware and critical of the "raunch" feminism surrounding me (at the time). My then boyfriend didn't technically read the book, but I think he got most of it second-hand via email from me :p

I agree that FCP is a quick and easy but valuable read. :yes:

KaliMama
07-15-2010, 05:33 PM
Get free shipping on Powells.com orders, no minimum purchase! Hurry, ends Sunday! Wahooooo (http://www.powells.com/fourdayfreeshipping.html?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=facebook_fans&utm_content=Free%20Shipping%20July)!

KaliMama
07-15-2010, 05:36 PM
Seduction, Slavery and Sex (http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/15/opinion/15kristof.html?_r=1)


Against all odds, this year’s publishing sensation is a trio of thrillers by a dead Swede relating tangentially to human trafficking and sexual abuse.

“The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” series tops the best-seller lists. More than 150 years ago, “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” helped lay the groundwork for the end of slavery. Let’s hope that these novels help build pressure on trafficking as a modern echo of slavery.

Still reading it. Still loving it.

Ariann
07-15-2010, 09:59 PM
I hope that I never read a book that good! :p

Yeah, seriously. It seemed like a weird positive review!